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Indian Army General News

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by jagjitnatt, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Members kindly post all Army related news in this thread. No need to create a new thread for every news. A new thread can be created for an important news or news that has significance. Every other news to be posted here.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. hotstud69

    hotstud69 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Slow Going As India Revamps Army

    Program delays and an urgent need for upgrades and new equipment are among the challenges confronting Lt. Gen. V.K. Singh, India’s new army chief of staff, as he begins wrestling with modernization of the 1.1-million-strong force.

    The service has issued numerous requests for information (RFI) and proposals as it moves to increase its operational capabilities. The list of needs is long. Key items include: artillery, missiles, rocket launchers, helicopters and ground strike aircraft, radar, night-vision equipment, future force gear and apparel, and network-centric and battle-management systems.

    Progress is being made, however slowly. The first step toward waging network-centric warfare at the tactical level will be through Project Sakthi, which establishes an artillery combat command-and-control system to integrate weapon operations. The signal corps, the lead agency and center for information and cyber-security in the military and at the national level, directs the project. The corps is working to make the army a network-enabled force by 2012 and a network-centric one by 2017. “This will involve consolidation of all networks to provide the army with an optimal, secure and robust infrastructure to meet operational and peacetime requirements, one that withstands technical and physical degradation,†an army spokesman says.

    The army’s plans in this area also involve the “Network for Spectrum†project, which is being implemented by the government’s telecommunications department in exchange for spectrum being released from the defense quota. The army is installing a fiber-optic cable network to meet its bandwidth needs. When complete, the service will vacate existing spectrum in use by the military, freeing it for civilian applications. Plans to upgrade the cyber-security of networks are also under consideration.

    Meanwhile, ITT Corp. expects its night-vision devices to attract interest from the army aviation corps, which issued an RFI for night-vision goggles for helicopter pilots among others. Should the project be approved, ITT will partner with government-owned Bharat Electronics Ltd. (BEL) in producing the devices. ITT will provide select components and BEL will be responsible for power optics, says David Melcher, president of ITT Defense and Information Solutions.

    ITT is confident in the performance of the critical image-intensifier tube in the night-vision goggles, which it says is rugged, combat-proven and a good match for fixed- and rotary-wing aviators as well as ground forces. The *company says its enhanced night-vision goggles are the first to provide fusion (via optical overlay) of image-intensified and infrared imagery.

    BEL has asked ITT for 33,000 of the tubes. ITT for its part has applied for a Technical Assistance Agreement from the U.S Defense Department in order to produce the technology abroad. “We’re bound by what we can transfer by [U.S. government] International Traffic in Arms Regulations,†says Melcher. “Night-vision technology is protected, which is why we are looking at other ways [of using it overseas].â€

    As the world’s largest provider of military VHF radios and advanced tactical communication systems, ITT is also promoting Spearnet, which offers simultaneous voice, data and situational awareness in a low-cost multirole radio. Having been successfully used in Iraq and Afghanistan, Melcher says the product will be valuable to Indian soldiers.

    A fast-track program for procurement of $300 million worth of weapons and equipment for special forces is under way. Under the program, 10,000 troops will receive new gear in the next 15 months. The army envisions implementing a multibillion-dollar modernization program called Futuristic Infantry Soldier (F-Insas), to broaden the capabilities of infantry by making them multimission warfighters.

    Under the program, the army will buy antitank guided missile launchers with thermal-imaging sights, armored vehicles, rifles, battle-surveillance radars, ground sensors, secured communication systems, precision-guided ammunition, laser rangefinders that provide ballistic data, light clothing and bullet-resistant jackets.

    While critics are skeptical that the 2011 date for F-Insas prototype trials will be met, the army’s plans call for equipping the entire infantry—500,000 troops—with the gear by 2020.

    General Dynamics U.K., for one, is interested in bidding on the battle-management system, a technology the company specializes in. General Dynamics delivered Bowman, the British Army’s battle-management system, as well as similar programs to the Netherlands and Romania. “We have upgraded more than 13,000 vehicles—the largest number of any company—including T72 tanks and BMP infantry fighting vehicles, both of which the Indian army uses,†says spokesman Mark Douglas.



    http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_channel.jsp?channel=defense&id=news/dti/2010/06/01/DT_06_01_2010_p30-227730.xml&headline=Slow Going As India Revamps Army
     
  3. prototype

    prototype Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indian Army Test Drives Tatra Vehicles All over India

    Latest Tatra vehicles likely to be inducted into Indian Army were found test driven here on the highway at Panambur on Friday June 18. The vehicle was moving down south the state from Bangalore as part of the vehicles’ all-terrain test drive all over the country.

    Speaking to Daijiworld army official Basavaraj, who was behind the wheels said it is a special vehicle which is being taken on a test drive on the roads all over India. We are testing its ability in terrains like sea, deserts, plains and hills so that they can soon be introduced into the Indian Army.

    Tatra T815 is available in three configurations, namely heavy recovery vehicle, medium recovery vehicle and light recovery vehicle. This is an all-terrain vehicle developed by Tatra a.s., a vehicle manufacturer based in Czech Republic. It is used for various purposes such as transporting soldiers, tanks and missiles.

    Tatra vehicles are supplied in India by Bharat Earth Movers Limited (BEML), an Indian company based in Bangalore. A major public sector company which is in joint collaboration with Tatra Vectra Motors Limited supplies defence material in India. Tatra Vectra Motors is a joint venture between Tatra a.s. and UK based Vectra Group.

    “The vehicle will be tested all over India and its features will be made known to the public only on the Republic Day Parade next moving along Rajpat at Red fort, New Delhi on January 26.
     
  4. Desi Jatt

    Desi Jatt Captain ELITE MEMBER

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    what about AXE ??? do we have the jeep already or still under tests ?? and also rakshak and striker ?? these were supposed to be inducted.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2010
  5. hotstud69

    hotstud69 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    No-privates-on-parade-in-India

    ARMY chiefs have hired a band of soldiers but are still lacking some privates — because they are all EUNUCHS.
    High-ranking army officers wanted a regiment solely made up of castrated men to guard India's borders.

    The reason is they won't be "chasing women" all the time — as they are just not interested.

    Minister Tako Dabi, from the northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh which borders China, said: "Eunuchs are healthy, they are strong and they were not always neglecting their duties chasing women."

    The Indian arrangement comes after China set up outposts along its huge border manned by husband and wife soldier teams who live together hundreds of kilometres from the nearest town.

    They have to survive without electricity and water supplies but at least they have each other.

    Meanwhile India has decided to TACKLE its defence problems in a different way — stripping its soldiers of all desire.

    There are plenty of candidates too — India is estimated to have nearly a million eunuchs, or hijras, and most survive by begging or working in the sex trade.

    Others work by blessing newborn babies, weddings and housewarmings.

    Minister Dabi added: "There are so many of them and most of them have lived very healthy lifestyles and look after themselves.

    "Currently, most of are sex workers or beg on the streets so it would be much better to deploy them in this kind of work where they would not miss the company of the opposite sex."

    No privates on parade in India | The Sun |News
     
  6. hotstud69

    hotstud69 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Army orders 1 million pieces of grenade developed by DRDO’s Chandigarh lab

    About a decade after being designed, the Army has approved bulk production of lightweight modular hand grenades developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) for induction.

    An order has been placed with the Ordnance Factory Board for supplying one million hand grenades to the Army. Known as Shivalik, these would replace the existing M-36 HE grenades, the original version of which dates back to the Second World War. Developed by DRDO’s Chandigarh-based Terminal Ballistics Research Laboratory, the new grenade overcomes the safety hazards posed by the existing grenades. The M-36, according to the DRDO, has a severe reliability problem due to its flawed fusing system and uneven fragmenting pattern, making it unsafe even for the thrower.

    Shivalik uses a modular plastic body and pre-formed cylindrical mild steel fragments for uniform distribution of fragments to overcome these deficiencies. Additional features have been incorporated into the fuse’s arming mechanism to ensure greater safety during storage, transportation and airdropping. Fragmentation distribution can also be controlled for use in offensive or defensive roles by attachment of a fragmentation sleeve. The use of plastic has also resulted in reduction of the grenade’s overall weight. Unlike earlier grenades, it can be para-dropped if urgent re-supplies are needed and can function in temperatures ranging from minus 20 to 55°C.

    Besides the Shivalik, the Army has also approved bulk production of the add-on 40 mm under-barrel grenade launcher (UBGL) that is attached to rifles for increasing their firepower. The UBGL, which can be mounted on the INSAS as well as AK-47 rifles, was developed keeping in view the global trend in technology for small arms from the concept of point-target capability to area-target capability. Capable of night-firing, it fills the gap between the maximum range achieved by a hand grenade and the minimum range of a mortar while giving better accuracy than both.

    Another unique weapon under development by the DRDO is the “chill grenade”, which uses extract of Bhut Jolokia, certified as the world’s hottest chilli and is native to the northeast. Part of a range of equipment being developed by the DRDO for counter-insurgency and internal security operations, the chilli-grenade is non-toxic and non-lethal and functions like tear-gas used by the security forces. Its pungent fumes can smoke out terrorists or hostile elements from hideouts

    Army orders 1 million pieces of grenade developed by DRDO?s Chandigarh lab
     
  7. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    ^^ 1 million??

    That's a lot.
    Majority of it would need to be destroyed when they would be replaced by their successors 10-12 years from now.

    It would be nice if they can be exported to friendly countries.
     
  8. terminator

    terminator FULL MEMBER

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    Children of the tehreek



    When columns of the Indian Army drove through Srinagar on 7 July, rifles pointed out at the city, it was meant as a show of force; to tell its ‘mutinous’ population – and those watching elsewhere – just who was really in charge. Disconcertingly for the Indian government, it has had the opposite effect. Alarm bells have been sounding off: the situation in Kashmir is again explosive; the lid looks ready to blow off.

    Although the army has for years virtually controlled rural Kashmir, images of grim-faced soldiers on a ‘flag-march’ in Srinagar carried a different symbolism. For Srinagar has been the exception – the showpiece of ‘normalcy’, of a possible return to the bosom of India’s accommodating heart. Typically, the well-publicised entry of the soldiers was followed by a flurry of obtuse clarifications: the army was not taking over Srinagar; this was not a flag-march, only a ‘movement of a convoy’; yes, it was a flag-march, but only in the city’s ‘periphery’. The contradictions seemed to stem from a reluctance to deal with the elephant in the room: after more than 15 years, the army had once again been called out to stem civil unrest in Srinagar.

    When the Indian Army was deployed in Kashmir during the 1990s, the rebellion seemed to be fast spinning out of India’s control. Twenty years later, what has changed? There is now a massive investment in a ‘security grid’, built with more than 500,000 security personnel and shored up by a formidable intelligence network, said to involve some 100,000 people. The armed militancy, too, has officially been contained. Meanwhile, the exercise of ‘free and fair’ elections has been carried out to persuade the world that democracy has indeed returned to Kashmir. (Elections certainly delivered the young and telegenic Omar Abdullah as Chief Minister; but about democracy, Kashmiris will be less sanguine. They will recognise it the day the military columns and camps are gone from the valley.)

    Yet July was haunted by echoes of the early years of the tehreek, the movement for self-determination. As a brutally imposed lockdown curfew entered its fourth day, there was no safe passage past the paramilitary checkpoints – not for ambulances, not for journalists. For those four days, Srinagar’s newspapers were not published; local cable channels were restricted to just 10 minutes a day, and still had to make time for official views. SMS services remained blocked the entire month; in some troubled towns, cell-phone services were completely discontinued. But Srinagar still reverberated with slogans every night, amplified from neighbourhood mosques: ‘Hum kya chahte? Azadi!’ (What do we want? Freedom!) and ‘Go back, India! Go back!’

    War of perception
    The real barometer of the panic in the Indian establishment, though, was not the army’s flag march. It was the frantic speed (and dismal quality) of the attempts to obscure the crisis. In place of politics, it was once again left to disinformation to staunch the haemorrhage. At first, the Home Ministry began with the improbable charge that the Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Toiba was organising and funding stone-throwing on the streets of Srinagar. This was a rather tame accusation for a militant group whose real signature is the ferocity of its attacks, as displayed clearly in the Mumbai strikes of November 2008. The only people who appeared to swallow this line were the loyal television anchors on the ‘national’ media; but with no real evidence to go on, even they let the mess quietly slide off the table.

    Evidence arrived soon enough, when the Home Ministry made available a taped phone conversation between two men described as ‘hardliner’ separatists. As the audio crackled and hissed, television channels provided translations: ‘There must be some more deaths’; ‘10-15 people must be martyred’; ‘You are getting money but not doing enough’. Despite the comic-book directness, it sounded like serious business. In the context of such ‘evidence’, mainstream television channels began parachuting their star power into Srinagar, and the empty, silent city became the backdrop against which they could stage their own spectacle.

    The CNN-IBN correspondent, happily embedded inside an army truck as it made its way through Srinagar, was extolling the impact of the flag march (even as an official was busy denying that there had been any such thing). NDTV provided its usual high-wire balancing act, with Barkha Dutt dredging up the ‘pain on both sides’. The grief of the mourning father of 17-year-old Tufail Mattoo, killed when his skull was taken apart by a teargas shell, was weighed against a Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) commandant ruing the damage to his truck’s bulletproof windscreen. But such expedient journalism paled before far more damaging hubris. While these ‘national’ reporters had the run of curfew-bound Srinagar, they omitted to mention that their Srinagar-based colleagues – local, national and even international journalists – had been locked in their homes and offices for three days.

    While the spin generated by New Delhi probably has an impact on the middle-class viewer of the mainstream Indian media, it has little effect on people in Kashmir. On the ground, they continue to make sense of their own reality. The inability, or refusal, to comprehend this has become endemic to all arms of the Indian state. An exaggerated, even fluid, notion of reality takes its place, in which perception is everything. This was underlined forcefully in June when the chiefs of the army, navy and air force announced the new ‘Doctrine on Military Psychological Operations’, a policy document that aims to create a ‘conducive environment’ for the armed forces operating in ‘sub-conventional’ operations such as Kashmir and the Northeast. The doctrine reportedly provides guidelines for ‘activities related to perception management’. Manipulating the output of a few dozen newspapers and television channels is certainly hard work, but nothing compared with the much harder task of understanding – perhaps even accommodating – the aspirations of Kashmiris.

    Out of touch
    The intensity of the crisis did help in one way, though: it forced some candour out of the familiar faces of Kashmiri politics. (These are the visible ones, called up in times of crisis to represent Kashmir on television. The invisible ones were, as usual, already in detention.) Mehbooba Mufti of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP) admitted on television that mainstream (or pro-India) political parties have lost all credibility, and now have no role to play in stemming the anger in the streets. When asked why politicians were not taking out ‘peace marches’, former separatist and now ‘mainstream’ leader Sajjad Lone bluntly said that all of them ran the risk of being lynched by the people. Meanwhile, all the oxygen was taken up by discussion of the survival of Omar Abdullah’s government, something that mattered little to protestors.

    Amidst the baying chorus of TV panellists outraged by the gall of ‘stone-pelters’, many have forgotten that in 1991 it was precisely such public demonstrations – and civilian casualties at the hands of the CRPF – that finally triggered a full-fledged armed militancy. In recent weeks, Chief Minister Omar Abdullah’s language has shown how out of touch he is, joining the talk of ‘miscreants’ with his comments about ‘frayed tempers’ and waiting for ‘tempers to cool down’. Across the board, this disconnect with the structures of electoral politics helped to put the elections of two years ago in some perspective.

    In 2007, I finished a documentary film on Kashmir, which had tried to pull back from the quagmire of everyday events to understand the inchoate ‘sentiment’ for azadi. Quite by coincidence, the film arrived at the very moment that the constructed ‘normalcy’ of Kashmir was about ready to be shown off: tourists were flowing in, more than 400,000 people had taken part in the pilgrimage to the Amarnath shrine, and elections were being discussed. Screenings of the documentary in India were often met with raised eyebrows, with people incredulous that such sentiments could survive the weight of the cast-iron security grid – and, of course, the passage of 20 years. Yet things can change in a day, and so they did.

    In early summer 2008, isolated protests broke out over the acquisition of land for the Amarnath Shrine Board. This eventually turned into the most formidable upsurge of the past decade, with peaceful demonstrations of up to 20,000 people at a time. The cascading protests carried on for several months before being curbed, but not before more than 60 people lost their lives to the bullets of the security forces. In the summer of 2009, Shopian district was shaken by the rape and murder of two young women; once again, mostly peaceful protests paralysed the valley, and Shopian town was shut down for an unprecedented 47 days. The cycle of street violence in 2010 too began several months ago, with the uncovering of the Machil killings, where soldiers of the Indian Army (including a colonel and a major) were charged with the murder of three civilians, presenting them as militants for the reward money (see accompanying story by Dilnaz Boga). Protests led to the killing of protesters, which has led to more protests, and more killings.

    New front
    What do Kashmiris want? Most of all, even before azadi, they want justice. As they watched the Indian Army columns moving through Srinagar last month, Kashmiris would have been reminded that the protests this summer started with the Army in the killing fields of Machil. But like the Shopian incident, Machil too has begun to be edged off the burner, and forgotten, as have the hundreds of such killings that civil-society groups have painstakingly tried to resurrect. So, just as elections cannot be confused with democracy in Kashmir, an elected government is no substitute for a working justice system. Meanwhile, the prolonged use of the Public Safety Act, and the dangerous license of the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, is slowly wearing thin for the young. This July, as the numbing news of young Kashmiris being shot in street protests started pouring in, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq, the chairman of the All Parties Hurriyat Conference, told the press that ‘the baton of the freedom struggle has now been passed on to the next generation’. He could have added that, over twenty years, the baton might also have moved from the armed militancy and the ‘separatists’, straight onto the street.

    As the taped phone conversation provided by the Home Ministry was being celebrated on TV, in only a few hours a more accurate translation of what was actually an innocuous conversation was burning through the Internet. This phone ‘evidence’ evaporated under the heat of scrutiny, its effects felt even in Delhi newsrooms. Such a speedy deconstruction of a suspect claim is only the latest in the deeply political use of the Internet by young Kashmiris. These are children of the tehreek, born and brought up in the turmoil of the last two decades. They have not, and probably will not, become armed mujahideen. But thousands are out on the streets, throwing stones, occasionally drawing blood, often taking hits, but in any case successfully paralysing the increasingly bewildered security forces. What armed militant could achieve more?

    So will the Internet be the next threat for the Home Ministry? Will they accuse the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen of supporting the Facebook chatter about the ‘intifada’ in Kashmir? And after that? Already, young Kashmiris on social-networking sites are reporting phone calls from belligerent police officers, threatening them with serious charges including ‘waging war against the state’. Reports said that Qazi Rashid, the young mirwaiz of south Kashmir, has been accused of ‘instigating violence and justifying stone-pelting’ – through Facebook.



    Himal Southasian/Children of the tehreek
    :india:
     
  9. terminator

    terminator FULL MEMBER

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    Indian Army Chief’s confession



    Kashmir is the core issue of conflict between Pakistan and India and has lead to war between them on more than one occasion. After the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971, there had been a long period with relatively few direct armed conflicts involving the military forces of the two neighbors - notwithstanding the efforts of both nations to control the Siachen Glacier by establishing military outposts on the surrounding mountains ridges and the resulting military skirmishes in the 1980s and also fought a Kargil conflict in 1998. In an attempt to defuse the situation, many times both countries agreed for dialogues for Kashmir issue but there was no implementation of these agreements but till now this tension remains the same between Pakistan and India.

    But now there is some ambiguity about the status of Kashmir as Indian Army Chief General VK Singh has confessed of failures of the Indian Army in occupied Kashmir. In the first such narration over the years, he said the ‘basic reason’ behind the flare-up in the Kashmir valley was the failure to build on the gains that had been made by the Indian security forces in the occupied state, this statement is given on 13 July, 2010. On one hand this statement shows that India accepted her wrong head ness over Kashmir but on the other hand this statement degrade the Indian image at international level because India for many decades are trying to annex Kashmir with itself but now all of the sudden India concedes its mistakes regarding Kashmir issue. This change shows that there must be some rationale or strategy of India behind this statement by their army chief. Now its time to analyze that why India is doing so and what will be the implication of this Indian army chief’s statement for Pakistan.

    Pakistan and India both have their interests in Kashmir e.g. flow of water from Kashmir which comes in India and Pakistan as well, that’s why both countries want to annex Kashmir with themselves. But now India talks about the Kashmir as an independent state perhaps for few reasons. Firstly India is emerging as a regional power but there is some negative image in the world about India due to its wrong head ness over Kashmir, so now perhaps India wants to improve its image in the world by talking about the independency of Kashmir. Secondly India by separating Kashmir will be capable to counter the cross border terrorism and will get rid off from unwanted activities by the infiltrators and freedom fighters in India. Thirdly India also has some interest in Kashmir but at some extent because water flow form Kashmir to India is a major interest for India but India already made dams and stored water for future use, similarly Indian influence will be remained the same on Kashmir even Kashmir becomes independent state so India can afford to loose Kashmir. Fourthly India is emerging power and now its focus on the prosperity and wants to become hegemonic rather than engage in territorial disputes with Kashmir. Similarly the statement of Indian army chief has some implications for Pakistan as well. Firstly Pakistan has more interests in Kashmir as compare to India and secondly Pakistan will never be agree with the independent status of Kashmir because if Pakistan accepts the Kashmir as an independent state then Pakistan will also have to loose its northern part which will be annexed with Kashmir and after loosing the Northern part Pakistan will deprive of trade root because northern part is the major trade root of Pakistan. Secondly Pakistan for water depends on Kashmir because water flows from Kashmir to Pakistan. Thirdly, due to these interests Pakistan will wish to annex Kashmir with herself, in this way India will be free from blame that India don’t want to separate Kashmir but all blames will come on Pakistan in the world and its a Indian strategy to put Pakistan at the front because India always try to destabilize Pakistan by some how. Fourthly if Kashmir will become independent then there is a chance that Kashmir would like to make its strong alliances with India as compare to Pakistan because India is a emerging and strong power while Pakistan is a weaker state so threat perceptions for Pakistan is more as compare to India if Kashmir become independent. It’s an Indian strategy to destabilize and demoralize Pakistan while talking about the independent status of Kashmir.

    About Kashmir issue there is also some role of extra regional powers. US have good alliances with India and in case of Pakistan US are just using Pakistan as a front line for war on terror. USA and India security cooperation is flourishing. US wants India as a hegemonic power over the Muslim world so US support India in every aspects, even US gave India an assistance in the development of nuclear power industry even though India has refused to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Similarly US promised to provide security umbrella to India. It is also said that due to US, UN did not resolve Kashmir dispute. So US while preserving its own national interests using India as a tool. In Kashmir issue US yet did not play a positive role but now US wants Kashmir as independent state just to put Pakistan under more pressure and for this purpose US is using India as a tool and assured to preserve India’s interests while providing security umbrella to India. So it can be said that the statement by Indian army chief is a strategy which includes the Indo-US interests to destabilize Pakistan further.

    It is concluded that the statement by Indian army chief and his acceptance of mistakes regarding Kashmir issue shows that India has some new strategy against Pakistan while keeping her own interests remains the same. Similarly US also has its role in the formulation of this strategy at some extent perhaps because of the same interests of Indo-US that is to put Pakistan in more problems and to destabilize Pakistan by making Pakistan vulnerable regarding Kashmir dispute. Although Kashmir problem can be resolved through by diplomatic channels and US and UN both can resolve Kashmir dispute or Kashmir issue can be presented in International Court of Justice. But behind every crisis US factor always present. US don’t want Pakistan to come out from crises and using India as a tool especially in Kashmir dispute. So it can be said that the statement by Indian army chief is a new strategy by Indo-US against Pakistan.



    Indian Army Chief’s confession



    :india:
     
  10. brain_dead

    brain_dead Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Improving the Quality of Rations Supplied to Army Personnel

    Recent media reports on the quality of rations being supplied to the Indian Army are quite revealing and disturbing, given that the quality of rations has been found to be inferior and substandard particularly in insurgency prone and high altitude areas. It is difficult to imagine what army personnel feel when they receive rations that are not fit for human consumption. The recent CAG report about the quality of rations supplied to army soldiers is a pointer to the pathetic state of affairs in the procurement, inspection and distribution of both fresh and dry rations by the Army Service Corps and Army Purchase Organization, which are under the control of Army Headquarters. Introspection is certainly called for in view of the widespread ramifications on the fighting forces particularly which may arise because of sub-standard ration provisioning.

    The service corps incurs an annual expenditure of about Rs. 1,440 crore. The procurement procedures are well established through periodic amendment, depending upon the requirements of time. The procuring agencies are well known and form part of various formations to ensure timely procurement of quality rations, inspection and distribution. Therefore it is quite baffling to find such sub-substandard rations being given to troops. The CAG report has indicated that items like atta, rice, dal and edible oil supplied were 28 months past their expiry date. A similar situation prevails in the case of vegetables, fruit, meat and milk. Therefore the satisfaction levels of troops about quantity, quality and taste of rations is bound to be low.

    The cause for such deterioration needs to be looked into. As far as procurement procedures are concerned, perhaps there is a requirement to review the existing system of procurement of dry rations to ensure quality, speed and cost. A decentralized system for some of the items can always be considered if it would result in better quality. As far as fresh rations are concerned, the procedures are already well defined. However, the procuring agencies need to guard against several pitfalls. Some of these pitfalls, which have been broadly brought out in the CAG report, are lack of competition, 36 per cent of purchases being undertaken from a single vendor, 82 per cent of procurement in case of fresh rations being based on less than three quotes, existence of cartels, etc.

    Media reports have not ruled out the existence of rampant corruption in matters of procurement. There are instances where courts of enquiry have been held against even senior ASC officers. But this is really not the solution. At the least they can only act as a deterrent. The main issues are the improvement of the quality of ration items supplied, the removal of irregularities in quantity supplied and consumed, the acceptance only of quality rations with prescribed specifications, rigorous inspection procedures at the time of acceptance of items offered by the contractor to ensure quality and the right quantity.

    As far as the ASC’s role in procurement is concerned, it is imperative that it resorts to competitive ways to demolish cartels and the monopoly of contractors who have not only monopolized the business but adopted exploitative practices to keep genuine competitors away. If these practices are controlled in some of the major areas, it will be a breakthrough. However, to do this, a strong will and effort on the part of the procuring organization is needed.

    As already stated, better quality control and checks at the level of the contract operating officer and improvement in the process of distribution of ration items can also help to a large extent in the improvement of the supply chain up to the ultimate consumer in various nooks and corners of the country. The possibility of outsourcing ration distribution can also be considered as an option on an experimental basis.

    Another important aspect in ration procurement happens to be the cost of various items. The CAG in their report have touched upon cost differentials in many items with the same specifications. The report has mentioned the payment of exorbitant rates for various items of hospital supply at Delhi like lime, apples, oranges, etc. as against the contracted rates for normal supply of the same items with the same specifications at Delhi. Thus the report reveals considerable variations in the rates of fruits and vegetables for different units within a city. This is again a serious financial anomaly, which reflects on the procurement agency. This situation only indicates that either substandard items were supplied to units other than hospitals or the rates quoted were unrealistic or the contractor quoted these rates just to bag the contract for a big station like Delhi. To minimize such contingencies, on-line data sharing within various procuring CFAs can be considered. The purpose is to procure the various items at the most economical rates without compromising on quality.

    The government is stated to have made suitable provisions to supply special rations to jawans deployed in high altitude and insurgency prone areas. However this may not be the end of the problem unless concrete steps are initiated to improve the quality of already authorized and scaled ration items. A decentralized dry ration procurement system can be considered in order to tap better suppliers in a phased manner.

    As far as fresh rations are concerned, the need of the hour is to generate and infuse competition to break the monopolies and cartels in the entire process of procurement. The existing ASC procedures of procurement can also be reviewed, particularly the prevailing system of registration of contractors where the credibility of the contractor for supply of quality items in the past can be considered as an overriding factor. Media reports have pointed out the violation of norms in many cases. It is reported that several transport and tour companies were registered as vendors for supply of items like eggs, meat, vegetables, etc. Similarly a poultry farm was registered for the provision of transportation. Though all these issues are extremely crucial to deal with, however among all these issues the most crucial is inspection of the ration offered by a contractor under the contract and acceptance of the same by the contract operating officer with due care and with reference to quantity as well as quality. If these aspects are dealt with effectively, the possibility of at least some improvement in the quality of food supplied to the troops would come about.
     
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  11. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indigenous anti-mine, snow footwear for soldiers

    Troops deployed in high-altitude and naxal-affected areas are set to get designer footwear to protect them from 'anti-personnel' mines and frost bite.

    Indigenous anti-mine and snow boots designed by Footwear Design and Development Institute are on user trial by the Indian Army.

    "The shoes made by FDDI along with other contenders are on user trial by the Army and a decision in this regard is expected to be taken soon," said an Army official requesting anonymity.

    "The present anti-mine shoe used by the army comes from the Czech Republic. It weighs around 4 kilograms and is uncomfortable. The shoe made by us is lighter at 2.9 kgs and is on trial," says V B Parvatikar, Director (Technical) and the main architect of the shoes.
    "The pressure in a mine blast is 45000kg/cm square. The anti-mine shoe's shock absorption brings it down to 160kg/cm square. So, now, a soldier's bones will get fractured in the worst cases where as earlier, they used to get powdered," he says.

    The anti-mine boot has passed the blast test and is a contribution to human welfare with the objective to reduce soft-tissue, bone and vascular injuries to the foot and leg of victims involved in antipersonnel mine explosions.

    Anti-mine boots are combat design boot for troops with direct moulded polyether PU sole with chrome tanned leather upper lined with foam and vegetable tanned nappa leather.
    Army's MGO (Master General Ordnance) is looking for snow shoes for defence personnel at snow hound areas, high altitudes with snow cladded mountains, varying and difficult terrains.

    "Frost bite is a major worry at higher altitudes. The present shoes being used now come from Italy and Russia. The snow shoe made by us has longer life," says Parvatikar.
    The outer shell of the snow boot is made of special plastic to withstand temperature from -60°C to 100°C. Its surface is highly scratch resistant and has high tear strength.

    The outer sole is made of natural rubber for high skid resistance even at difficult terrains and in snow whereas the outer shell has been provided with special metallic (corrosion resistant) trims and flat laces for quick donning and doffing.

    The inner shoe is made of leather, synthetic, textile and sample lining to provide snug fitting, warmth and comfort in higher altitudes.

    While the life of the snow boot is longer, anti-mine shoe becomes useless after a mine blast.

    "There are problems of supply as these shoes are imported at the moment and cost around 12,000 to 13,000 per pair. We have brought down the cost to 2,000 to 3,000," says Parvatikar.

    http://www.deccanherald.com/content/98284/indigenous-anti-mine-snow-footwear.html
     
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  12. siegecrossbow

    siegecrossbow 2nd Lieutant ELITE MEMBER

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    Any pictures? I want to see how big these things are.
     
  13. brain_dead

    brain_dead Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    i think its already an integral part of INSAS system.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2010
  14. brain_dead

    brain_dead Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    A tribute to Indian soldiers on Haifa Day

    A moving ceremony to remember some 900 Indian soldiers who laid down their lives in liberating the Israeli port city Haifa during World War I was held for the first time at the Haifa Cemetery on September 22. (Read: Battle of Haifa - 23 Sep 1918)

    This is the first time such a ceremony was held to commemorate the memory of fallen Indian soldiers.

    [​IMG]

    The event was marked by a wreath laying ceremony by Ambassador of India to Israel, H E Navtej Sarna and other dignitaries. Speaking at the ceremony, Sarna underlined the important role played by the Indian soldiers during World War I and the valour shown by them in this theatre of operations.
    Captain Bahadur Aman Singh Jodha and Dafadar Jor Singh were awarded the Indian Order of Merit (IOM) and Captain Anop Singh and 2 Lt Sagat Singh were awarded the Military Cross (MC) as recognition for their bravery in this battle.

    Major Thakur Dalpat Singh MC is known in the annals of history as the Hero of Haifa for his critical role in the battle for Haifa.

    The action of the Indian troops has been vividly recorded in the Official History of the War- Military operation Egypt and Palestine (volume 2): "No more remarkable cavalry action of its scale was fought in the whole course of the campaign. Machine gun bullets over and over again failed to stop the galloping horses even though many of them succumbed afterwards to their injuries". This remains the only known incident in military history when a fortified town was captured by cavalry on the gallop.

    A two-member Indian Army delegation led by Col. M.S. Jodha, grandson of Captain Aman Singh Bahadur, had especially come here to attend the ceremony.


    Read more at: A tribute to Indian soldiers on Haifa Day

    Every year on September 23, the Indian Army commemorates "Haifa Day" on which two brave Indian cavalry regiments helped liberate the city in 1918 following dashing cavalry action by the 15th Imperial Service Cavalry Brigade.

    In the autumn of 1918, the Brigade was a part of the Allied Forces sweeping northwards through Palestine in the last great cavalry campaign in history.

    During the battle for Haifa in September 1918, the Indian troops exhibited exemplary cavalry skills and bravery in a successful cavalry charge which finally culminated in the liberation of Haifa.

    :: Bharat-Rakshak.com - Indian Military News Headlines ::
     
  15. RoYaN

    RoYaN Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    On 'Haifa Day,' India salutes WWI troops

    Along Haifa's Jaffa Street, just south of the row of fast-food and shawarma restaurants for which the city is famous, lie two cemeteries widely known as the final burial places of British soldiers who were killed in the pre-state Mandate during both world wars.

    Historically, Haifa became the most important city during British rule in Palestine after World War I. Its main seats of power in the country were located in the northern coastal city.


    But few know that one of the cemeteries on Jaffa Street is actually a memorial site to honor Indian fighters whose ashes were scattered in a river back in their homeland. Even fewer are aware that those who liberated Haifa from the yoke of Ottoman rule in September 1918 were Indian horsemen who overran Turkish positions armed with spears and swords.

    In contrast to Haifans, the Indian military annually marks "Haifa Day," the day in which the Ottomans were ousted from the city. This year, however, the state made amends. On Wednesday, ceremonies were held to recognize the anniversary of the battle that put an end to 400 years of Turkish suzerainty over the city with an impressive memorial attended by Indian diplomats, Haifa municipal officials, the defense minister's adviser Amos Gilad and foreign military attaches.

    Yigal Greiber, a member of the Haifa Historical Society, told how the British Empire recruited Indians, who were subjects of colonialism, to the armed forces to fight in World War I. These warriors were dedicated and courageous on the battlefield.

    "Haifa was a secondary target for the British army," Greiber said. "The main target was Nazareth, and from there, Damascus. But on September 22, the British received an errant reconnaissance report which indicated that the Turks were quitting Haifa. The British then made preparations to enter the city. In the Balad al-Sheikh region [today known as Nesher] the British came under heavy fire."

    After the British regrouped, the commander of its forces decided to send an elite unit comprising Indian horsemen. The three platoons were tasked with attacking the Turkish positions on the flanks and overrunning their artillery guns placed in the center of Mount Carmel.

    One of the commanders of the force was Colonel Takur Dalpat Singh, who was killed at the start of the battle and has been recognized by the Indian armed forces as "hero of Haifa." His deputy, Bahadur Aman Singh Jodha, took control and defeated the Turks.

    The ceremony on Wednesday was attended by Colonel M.S. Jodha, the grandson of the man who went on to lead the horsemen. Jodha and the remainder of the Indian delegation toured the city and visited areas in which his grandfather fought.

    The Indian ambassador to Israel, Navtej Sarna, noted in his speech that the soldiers fought valiantly for the British while they were engaged in a struggle against the British for independence.

    Shlomo Gilboa, a member of the Haifa city council, said that few in the city are aware of the history and the municipality would officially mark the occasion annually.

    http://www.haaretz.com/print-editio...s-wwi-troops-1.315380?localLinksEnabled=false
     

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