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Indian Army General News

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by jagjitnatt, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    It's not like Dhruv is a fully indigenous product. Even the design was made in collaboration with Germany's MBB and
    most of the components are imported according to our own CAG.

    However, it's not a matter of what's indigenous or not. It's a matter of age & maintenance procedure. Also pilot skill. The
    Cheetahs/Chetaks are simply too old - but make no mistake in the prime of their time they served us really well.
     
  2. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  3. kpmailit

    kpmailit 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    RIP, gradually army losing headcounts that is unwanted, unexpected.
     
  4. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Sad part is 3 brave souls have lost their life . Whether it is built in HAL or designed in HAL etc does not matter . Chetak and Cheetah have served a long way just like Mig-21 and these old work horse have proved their metal ,hence they have to replaced now without any further delays

    HAL should make dhruv more safer with stringent quality test , since it has been exported and also serves indian armed force the potential is huge but it should become more safe chopper
     
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  5. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    RIP to the fallen!!
     
  6. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    NEW DELHI — The Indian Defence Ministry — faced with a shortage of ammunition for its Russian-made T-90 tanks, coupled with an inability to produce ammunition at home — has no choice but to give in to Russian terms and purchase marked-up ammo from Moscow, an MoD source said.
    The MoD reluctantly agreed to the deal last month, despite the fact that Russia hiked the price by 20 percent and refused to accept offset obligations.
    Russia will receive a $197 million contract for the fin-stabilized armor-piercing discarding sabot. In 2011, the asking price for the same order was $163 million.
    Besides jacking up the price, the Russians also refused to transfer technology for making the rounds to the state-owned Ordnance Factory Board (OFB), a demand India has been making for the past five years, the MoD source added. A diplomat from the Russian Embassy merely said the sale of T-90 ammunition was on agreed-upon terms, and refused to give details.
    India was forced to agree to the terms because OFB’s efforts at making the ammunition failed, an Indian Army official said.
    “India bought T-90 tanks from Russia without transfer of technology for ammunition, which has resulted in perpetual shortages for the ammunition,” the official said.
    “There were reportedly multiple problems in procurement of T-90 tank ammunition,” said Rahul Bhonsle, retired Indian Army brigadier general and defense analyst. “The ammunition produced in India was not compatible with the fire-control system of the tanks, thus these have to be modified. The Defence Research and Development Organisation [DRDO] has not been able to resolve the problem, hence there is a challenge. Meanwhile, there was apparently no fallback plan, thus orders had to be made to the single supplier, which hiked the prices thus compounding the problems.”
    A DRDO official said technology for the ammunition actually has been developed and transferred to OFB.
    The Indian Army official, however, said the ammunition developed by DRDO is only for the T-72 tanks. The ammunition failed when it was used in the T-90 tanks.
    “The OFB has failed to produce ammunition for T-90 tanks because it is far more sophisticated than ammunition for Russian made T-72 tanks,” Bhonsle said. “Because in the case of T-90 ammunition, there are intricate linkages with the fire-control computer.”
    “The way out of the ammunition crisis is the need to tie up with overseas original equipment manufactures [OEMs],” said defense analyst Nitin Mehta. The rise in demand for T-90 ammunition as the fleet strength increases will be an attraction for OEMs to come forward to partner with Indian companies in producing the required ammunition, Mehta said.
    The Indian Army operates more than 500 T-90 tanks, and plans to increase the strength to more than 1,300 by 2020 through license-production at Indian facilities.
    An executive at a domestic private company said OFB has a monopoly on ammunition.
    “The private companies [focus on] propellant and explosives, and not in the filling of the shell or rocket motor,” the executive said

    India Gives In to Russia's Terms For High-Priced Tank Ammunition | Defense News | defensenews.com

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Sree

    Sree Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    :agree::agree::agree::agree::agree:
     
  8. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  9. Megatroll

    Megatroll FULL MEMBER

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    Good. No reliance on foreign weapons no matter how high tech they are. A waste of tax payer's money
     
  10. tusharm

    tusharm Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Good Decision by Indian Army
     
  11. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Sensible move TOT for spike and use those tech in developing future version of nag and CLAM
     
  12. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    Garhwal team after winning the gold medal


    As Major Lalit Mohan Joshi and his team of seven jawans from 8th Battalion, The Garhwal Rifles (called 8 Garhwal) lined up on October 23, in the biting cold of the Cambrian Mountains in Wales, UK, they were prepared for a gruelling test of their endurance and battlefield skills.

    Over the next 50 hours, British Army evaluators would judge how the team navigated non-stop across the marshy terrain, and dealt with battlefield situations thrown at them, including enemy minefields, giving first aid to their casualties, bringing down artillery fire, and attacking an enemy bunker. They would swim across an icy river in their 30-kilo backpacks, keeping their rifles dry. Finally, they would reconnoitre an enemy position and bring back information just like a patrol in battle.

    This was the Cambrian Patrol, the world’s toughest test of infantry skills, which is described as “the Olympics of patrolling”. This year 119 teams participated, including soldiers from Australia, Canada, France, Italy and Norway. The Pakistan Army sent a specially selected team.

    At a ceremony on October 25, five teams were awarded gold medals for meeting cruel time lines and displaying tactical skills of an exceptional order. Four were British Army units; 8 Garhwal was the only overseas winner.

    "It was cold and foggy, which made map reading difficult. The marshes, which were everywhere, sucked you in. Even so, we retained our focus. Initially, all the other competitors appeared 8 feet tall. But when we finished with the gold, we were feeling 8 feet tall ourselves," says Lance Naik Gajpal Singh, whose lean frame only hints at the steel inside.

    Lance Naik Dimple Gusain describes a deciding factor in the team’s gold medal: when the patrol sneaked up on their recce objective — an anti-aircraft gun position manned by British soldiers — they found a British identity card lying on the ground. "When we returned it at the finish point, the organisers realised how close our patrol had reached", laughs Gusain.

    Over years of formidable Indian performances in the Cambrian Patrol, an expectation has grown that an Indian team would do well. Last year, a team from 3/9 Gurkha Rifles won silver; in 2010, the 4/9 Gurkha Rifles team won gold.

    Major Joshi warmly recounts the encouragement of 1 Grenadier Guards, the British Army “host battalion”, which accommodated his team in Aldershot and familiarised them with the British radios and weapons they would use during competition. "They were so pleased at our gold," says Joshi.

    The Indian Army carefully selects the team it enters for the Cambrian Patrol, holding competitions at unit and formation levels to identify the best battalion team. Joshi and his men then trained at the Infantry School, Mhow and spent a month in the mountains at Lansdowne, acclimatising for the Welsh highlands.

    "We are incredibly fit, but they pushed us to the limit. At one point, they stopped us at the base of a hill and said, 'your men are fighting on top, and you need to take them ammunition.' They loaded 20 kilos of ammunition onto the 30-kilo backpacks we were already carrying. Then they made us run up the hill", recounts Havaldar Dilwar Singh.

    "On one occasion, I slipped and fell face-down into the marsh. My face was in the water, but I was so exhausted that I just lay there. It was an effort to lift myself up and continue", says Lance Naik Mahipal Singh.

    "But this was the most enjoyable thing that any of us have ever done", chips in Joshi. Every man in the team nods assent.

    Says chief organiser of the Cambrian Patrol, Brigadier Martyn Gamble: "About a third of teams failed to finish and is again a testament to how much of a challenge this is. I'm entirely comfortable that only about four per cent of all teams achieved gold. Those people who have achieved a finish or a medal should be applauded."

    Joshi and his men had flown out of India on Diwali, and returned on October 27 --- commemorated as Infantry Day after Indian infantrymen were airlifted to Srinagar that day in 1948, as Pakistani tribal militias closed in on the J&K capital.

    "We may not yet have a technological edge, which will be built up over time. But in grit, guts and endurance, the Indian infantryman is second to nobody in the world," says Lt Gen Ata Hasnain, who is from the Garhwal Rifles.
    Moment of glory for Indian Army | Business Standard News
     
  13. AKIIN

    AKIIN 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Israel says it’s “ready and willing” to share with India its technology for border protection
    By Aman Sharma, ET Bureau | 8 Nov, 2014, 04.55AM IST

    [​IMG]

    NEW DELHI: Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh, accompanied by Israel National Security Advisor Joseph Cohen, had a first-hand look on Thursday how Israel guards its border with Palestine on the Gaza strip and officials said India plans to implement some of these technologies to guard its sensitive border with Pakistan.

    Singh visited one of the border out-posts in Gaza before meeting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for an hour-long meeting on Thursday where Netanyahu said Israel was "ready and willing" to share with India its technology for border protection.

    An official said Singh was "greatly impressed" by the technology used in the highly-sophisticated border security system of Israel which includes high-quality long-range day cameras along with night observation systems employing third generation thermal imagers. This is backed up by land surveillance through patrols and detection radars, with the latter able to detect any movement across the border for several kilometers, Singh was told.

    The Fence is also fitted with electronic touch and motion sensors as well as underground sensors which use seismic systems to detect any tunneling attempts below the fence for intrusion, the Indian Home Minister was briefed by the Israeli NSA.

    Singh was told that in certain "dark areas" where fencing was not possible, like on India-Pakistan border as well, Israel had used small UAV's for the security coverage. Plus, every border post on the Israel border is a self-sufficient unit.
     
  14. Sree

    Sree Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    :cheers::cheers::cheers:
     
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  15. m2monty

    m2monty Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    :cheers::cheers::cheers:
     
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