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Indian Army General News

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by jagjitnatt, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  2. SpArK

    SpArK SorCeroR Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    India's next Chief of Army Staff will be one of these men.


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  3. rocky.idf

    rocky.idf BANNED BANNED

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    Why isn't the Southern Command Chief in the running? Any Artillery officer made it to the top so far?
     
  4. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Army Chief on Four days UK visit

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    Just three days after the Supreme Court rejected his plea to reconcile his birth date in official records as May 10, 1951, Indian Army Chief Gen. V. K . Singh is all set to undertake four day visit to Britain from Monday, including that he may not quit his post.

    The Indian Army officila spokeperson said in a release here Sunday that Gen. Singh will be into Britain till Feb 17 to interact with senior British Military and civilian leadership and discuss defence related bilateral relations between the two nations.

    "Gen. V. K.Singh is under taking four days tour to United Kingdom from Feb 14 to 17, 2012 during his visit, the army chief will be interacting and will the senior military and civilians hierachy and will discuss various defence related issues to strengthen existing defence ties with UK, the spokeperson said.

    The Indian Army Chief will be visiting the Land Warfare Centre in Salibury plains and the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst during his visit to Land Warfare Centre, he will witness training and preparenwss of British Army Brigade preparing for induction into Afganistan.

    The last visit by Indian Army Chief of Britain by Gen Deepak Kapoor in March 2008.

    India shows a healthy and control bilateral and strategic relations with Britain that are multi facted and have been strengthened over the years with regular exchange of visit at political, diplomatic and military levels.

    A strong bilateral relationship of priorty to both countries for economiccommercial, historical and foreign policy reasons, and the large indian diaspora in Britain.

    The visit by the chief will added the necessary impetus to the existing defence relationship and broad based it into a mutually beneficially partnership," the army spokeperson said.

    India's relations in the fiels of defence with Britain have graduated to comprehensive defence cooperations to includ courses and training for the United Nations Peacekeeping the field operation, joint training icuding exercise in the field of counter terrorism includong employment of special forces and exchange of observer on each other's army exercises
     
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  5. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Lt. Gen. Halgali is new deputy chief of Indian Army

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    Lt. Gen. Ramesh Halgali, a whistle-blower in the 2009 70-acre Sukna military station land scam in West Bengal that led to court martial of senior army officers, Monday took over as the deputy chief of army staff.

    He will be in charge of information systems and training in the army headquarters, an army release said here.

    Commissioned into the Sikh Light Infantry regiment in December 1972, Halgali has attended Defence Services Staff College, National Defence College, a Senior Fellows Course in Washington DC, and is an M.Phil. from DAV Institute of Management, Indore.

    The officer has held many important staff and instructional assignments. He commanded an infantry brigade and division in Jammu and Kashmir and a corps in Western sector. Till recently, he was director general of military training.

    He was awarded Sena Medal (Gallantry) in 1992 and the Ati Vishisht Seva Medal for distinguished service in 2012.

    His name figured among the officers involved in the Sukna military station land scam, as he had served as the chief of staff to Lt. Gen. P.K. Rath at the corps headquarters there. But later, it came to light that he was the whistle-blower and was let off.
     
  6. Nick 779

    Nick 779 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indian Army to provide better navigational aids to pilots
    Published February 24, 2012 | By admin

    SOURCE: PTI
    [​IMG]
    Three months after its Cheetah helicopter strayed across the Line of Control (LoC) into Pakistan, the Indian Army is looking to provide better navigational aids to its pilots to help them know their position while flying.

    An Army helicopter had strayed into Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK) on October 23 last year and was forced by Pakistani military to land there.

    The Cheetah helicopter with two pilots and two engineers was made to land in Olding sector near Skardu, about 20 km from the LoC, after it strayed due to inclement weather.

    The Northern Army Commander under his special financial powers has issued a tender to procure 80 GPS advanced navigation systems which will be equipped on the Cheetah and Chetak helicopters, Army officials said here.

    The two pilots and the other crew were returned safely within five hours of the incident after Pakistan ascertained that they had not strayed inside its territory deliberately.

    After the incident, the Army had ordered an inquiry to find out the reasons behind it.

    One of the suggestions given by the inquiry committee was to upgrade and improve the navigational aids provided to the pilots to avoid such incidents in the future, officials said.

    The Indian Army operates the largest fleet of helicopters in the country which mainly consists the light weight Cheetah and Chetak choppers.

    Its tender to procure 197 light utility choppers is also at an advanced stage.
    Posted in India
     
  7. Steel

    Steel Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indo-US joint exercise from March


    An Indo-US military exercise Yudh Abhyas involving mechanized forces is scheduled to be conducted in Mahajan field firing range in the state from March first week. The latest in the series of exercises between the two countries is designed to improve bilateral cooperation between the two armies and enhance their ability to operate side by side at the tactical level, within the framework of UN peacekeeping operations.

    Defence sources said this exercise will see troops of US 25th Infantry Division, US Army Pacific, Hawaii train with Indian soldiers from the South Western Command in a well-designed setting for peace support operations. The participants will engage in a number of defined operational missions that include security of lines of communication, intelligence-based peace enforcement operations and extrication/rescue operations.

    A US military delegation comprising around 200 men accompanied by armoured personnel carriers will take part in the exercise, army sources said. American tanks will also take part in Yudh Abhyas which is a company-level military training exercise, the sources added.

    Indian Army will have its Russian-origin BMPs along with armoured tanks for the joint exercise.

    After the 'Yudh Abhyas, 130 Indian infantry troops will join their American counterparts in the exercise Shatrujeet to be held in April in California.

    Later, in the series of joint training exercises, special forces of the two countries will also test their skills in a mountain exercise codenamed 'Vajra Prahar'. Sixty troops from American special forces and an equal number from the Indian Army's 3 Para (Special Forces) will take part in the wargame in Chaubatia in Uttarakhand in August, the sources said.

    Indo-US joint exercise from March - The Times of India
     
  8. Steel

    Steel Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indian Army to conduct war exercise in March

    The Indian Army will be conducting an exercise in Rajasthan from March to May 2012. All formations and units under the Jaipur-based South Western Command will participate to validate doctrines in a Joint Service Environment.

    The exercise will be based on the Integrated Theatre Battle Concept and will be one of the largest manoeuvres conducted so far. The joint synergy will be enhanced by the active participation of the IAF with the air assets of the Air Force being employed in an integrated manner.

    Battlefield transparency and operational plans based on real-time situational awareness will be enhanced using intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) inputs from unmanned aerial vehicles, radars and satellites.

    Defence spokesperson SD Goswami said the exercise will start with the mobilisation and build up of units in the months of February and March. This will be followed by training at unit and formation level and finally culminate into large scale manoeuvres.

    Indian Army to conduct war exercise in March - www.daily.bhaskar.com
     
  9. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    HAL making 159 Dhruvs for Indian Army

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    The defence public sector undertaking, Hindustan Aeronautics Limited’s (HAL) helicopter division on Tuesday said that the company’s order book position is strong. The HAL is working on producing 159 Advanced Light Helicopters (ALH) to be handed over to the Indian Army.

    The company also said that it is focusing on producing Weapon System Integrated (WSI) ALH to be handed over to the services and work on this was in the different stages.

    M S Srinath, General Manager, Helicopter Division, said here, “HAL had handed over seven ALHs to Border Security Force (BSF), which is being used for the anti-naxalite operations.”

    Srinath added that HAL has 19 production units and nine R &D centres spread across India. HAL has expertise on a diverse range of military and civil aircraft, providing self reliance to India’s aerospace capabilities.

    HAL, Helicopter Division, was established in the year 1974 and has produced more than 600 Cheetah, Chetak helicopters. The division is also credited with manufacturing more than 100 Advance Light Helicopters (ALH) which has been christened Dhruv.

    Srinath also said that the division has also produced ALHs which have been exported to Ecuador, Mauritius and Maldives.
     
  10. Wolf 9

    Wolf 9 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Lt Gen Bikram Singh is next Army Chief

    New Delhi, March 3, 2012 , K.V. Prasad .

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    Eastern Army Commander Lieutenant General Bikram Singh will be the next Chief of Staff of the 1.3 million-strong Indian Army. He will succeed General Vijay Kumar Singh, who retires on May 31.

    The announcement by the Defence Ministry on Saturday came 90 days ahead of the scheduled day of assumption of charge — as against the 60-day norm the government has been following. The move removes uncertainty over the successor following a rash of speculative reports that Gen. Singh could put in his papers early which could alter the succession plan of the senior-most Army Commander taking over as the next Chief.

    The appointment came a day after the incumbent Army Chief said he was not going to resign, effectively countering speculative reports by some television channels and dailies that Gen. Singh would resign after the Supreme Court disposed of his petition last month on the controversy over his year of birth.

    Lt. Gen. Bikram Singh was commissioned into the Sikh Light Infantry Regiment on March 31, 1972 and during the last four decades, he has served in a variety of Command and Staff appointments.

    Besides having commanded a Corps in the Northern Command, he served as Deputy Force Commander of the multination U.N. Peace Keeping Mission in Congo. He also served as U.N. observer in Nicaragua and El Salvador during early 1990s.

    Lt. Gen. Bikram Singh has studied with distinction at the Defence Services Staff College, the Army War College and the U.S. Army War College, Pennsylvania. He also has an M. Phil in Defence Management from Indore University. He is a recipient of the PVSM, the UYSM, the AVSM, the Sena Medal and the VSM and was one of the Honorary ADCs to the President of India.

    The Hindu : News / National : Lt Gen Bikram Singh is next Army Chief
     
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  11. Steel

    Steel Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Staff suicide weighs Indian Army down


    The number of Army personnel who took their own lives far exceeds those who succumbed to enemy bullets last year.

    “As many as 99 Army personnel committed suicide last year, while 65 were killed in security operations. Of the 99, 23 cases were registered in field areas and 76 in peace areas,” Army officials said, adding that the number of personnel committing suicide has gone down over the years.

    In 2010, 115 personnel committed suicide while the figure stands at 110 for the year 2009. Number of suicide deaths for 2007 and 2008 are 142 and 150 respectively.

    In a few cases, families of the personnel had alleged murder, following which inquiries were conducted to probe into the complaints.

    Staff suicide weighs Indian Army down
     
  12. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    No combat role for women in armed forces: Antony


    New Delhi: The government on Monday made it clear that it has no proposal to induct women in combat roles in the defence forces, including as fighter pilots in the Indian Air Force.

    Parliament was also informed that there has been a 67 per cent increase in the recruitment of women officers into the army, navy and air force in the last three years.

    "There is no proposal to induct women into combat duties in the defence forces including as fighter pilots in the Indian Air Force," Defence Minister AK Antony said in a written reply during question hour.
    No combat role for women in armed forces: Antony

    "Induction of women in combat duties has not been recommended by the studies carried out by the headquarters Integrated Defence Staff (HQ IDS) in 2006 and high level tri-services committee in 2011" he added.

    He also gave figures to buttress the point that there has been an increase in the women officers recruited since 2009.

    In 2009, the three services had recruited 219 women, of whom 70 were for the army, 24 for the navy and 125 for the air force.

    In 2010, the services recruited a total of 277 women officers. Of these, 93 were for the army, 39 for the navy and 145 for the air force.

    In 2011, the figures showed a 67 per cent increase since 2009. The defence forces had recruited 366 women that year, of whom 164 were for the army, 68 for the navy and 134 for the air force.

    In 2011, the total number of women officers in the three services stood at 1055 for the army, 288 for the navy and 936 for the air force.

    The number of women officers the previous year (2010) was 999 for army, 191 for navy and 889 for air force. In 2009, there were 1030 women officers in the army, 176 in the navy and 915 in the air force.

    Antony noted that there is no separate fixed sanctioned strength for recruitment of women officers in the armed forces and they are recruited within the overall sanctioned strength of the respective service.

    Also, there is no proposal to launch any special drive for recruiting rural women into the armed forces, he added.

    http://ibnlive.in.com/news/no-combat-role-for-women-in-armed-forces-antony/240755-3.html
     
  13. anuanoop0

    anuanoop0 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
    As Asia’s two rising powers boost defence capabilities, we ask who stands to benefit and what it means for the region.
    On Saturday, the Indian armed forces ended a major military exercise near the Chinese border, while China has announced that it will increase its military spending by 11.2 per cent in 2012.
    “For India, it’s the continental China that is the primary threat and challenge, rather than the maritime China, which is what most western analysts see because they are more concerned with oceanic sea lanes connecting western economies with Asia. This is a secondary priority for India.â€
    - Zorowar Daulet Singh, a research fellow at the Center for Policy Alternatives

    The four-day exercise, codenamed “Pralay†or devastation, tested a wide range of defence capabilities.
    Almost all major aircraft types operating within the Indian air force were involved in the drill, most of which took place in the disputed state of Arunachal Pradesh.
    For years, Sino-Indian bilateral relati ons have been affected by the dispute over Arunachal Pradesh, a territory bordered
    and cleocin t
    on the north by the Tibet region of China. While it has been administered by India as a state since 1987, China still claims most of it as part of the Tibet Autonomous Region.
    The exercise also coincided with an official visit by Yang Jeichi, the Chinese foreign minister, to India.
    Both the Chinese and Indian governments have recently increased their defence spending.
    “I don’t think China is trying to be provocative. Its relationship with Pakistan has existed for several decades, since World War II.â€
    - Richard Hu Weixing, an associate professor at the University of Hong Kong

    The two countries share a border that is approximately 4,000 kilometres long.
    About 40 per cent of the world’s population live in India and China, and with expanding economies the military stakes are high.
    Can an arms race between India and China be in the best interest of either one? Who stands to benefit from it? And, what are the likely ramifications for the Asia-Pacific region?
    Joining Inside Story with presenter Adrian Finighan are: Jonathan Holslag, the author of China + India: Prospects for Peace and the head of research at the Brussels Institute of Contemporary China Studies; Zorowar Daulet Singh, a research fellow at the Center for Policy Alternatives; and Richard Hu Weixing, an associate professor at the University of Hong Kong.
    “China increasingly … feels like a trapped giant with its diplomatic manoeuvrability being squeezed from all sides. The key question is, to which degree China will adjust its posturing and scale back its robust military manoeuvring offshore in the South China Sea and along the border with India.â€
    Jonathan Holslag, the head of research at the Brussels Institute of Contemporary China Studies

    Is an India-China arms race brewing? - Inside Story - Al Jazeera English

    read much more on:WORLD DEFENSE REVIEW
     
  14. rocky.idf

    rocky.idf BANNED BANNED

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    Brewing? Hasn't it been going on for some time?
     
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  15. Nick 779

    Nick 779 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Combat ready: Bikram Singh
    Published April 16, 2012 | By admin

    SOURCE : INDIA TODAY

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    Mid-November 2002. Brigadier Bikram Singh, commander of the 1 Sector Rashtriya Rifles, was overseeing counter insurgency operations from his small office in Anantnag, Kashmir. He was aggressively pushing his troops deeper into villages in south Kashmir to hunt down militants, mostly Afghans and Pakistanis, who had hideouts in the district.Insurgency was at its decisive point in Kashmir. Though the Army and the police had managed to secure the district headquarters, the villages were entrenched with militants and ambushes were common. In an attack on March 1, 2001, Bikram was seriously wounded, and a colonel and a rifleman were killed on the spot. Two civilians and a foreign militant were also killed in the encounter. As soon as the wounds healed, Bikram was back in action. When this reporter called on him at his Anantnag office, the brigadier looked calm and was welcoming. The situation, he said, was a “very tough one”.
    Ten years and many more tough battles later, Lt-General Bikram Singh is all set to become the Army chief. On May 31, when he takes over from General V.K. Singh, it will mark a generational shift, as he will be the first post-1971 war officer to lead the Army.
    Commissioned into the Sikh Light Infantry Regiment on March 31, 1972, Bikram commanded an infantry battalion in the northeast and one on the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir. He was a colonel when the Kargil war happened, and was the face of the Army as he briefed the media on the battle. Later, he commanded the troops at RR Sector in south Kashmir.
    He earned a steady stream of plum assignments, and became the commander of the Eastern Command in 2010. “He has an excellent ability to look at complex situations and go from planning to implementation,” said Brigadier (retd) Gurmeet Kawal, a colleague who served with him in the Northern Command. Gurmeet was Bikram’s classmate in Punjab Public School in Patiala and in the Indian Military Academy.
    Youngest and the only male among five siblings, Bikram is a bookworm, and holds two postgraduate degrees. He earned the reputation of an innovator in combat situations in his early days and excelled in irregular warfare and counter insurgency operations. His colleagues know little about his private life, other than that he likes ghazals, played cricket and hates spotlight. An officer who served under him in the northeast said he had always kept a low profile.
    Major-General (retd) G.D. Bakshi, who commanded a brigade in Kishtwar, Jammu, when Bikram was in Anantnag, said Bikram’s strength was his long combat experience. “He has worked extensively in the field, held important assignments at the headquarters and has served abroad under the UN flag. He has been in active military zone for a long time,” said Bakshi. “The nature of warfare is changing and it is good for the Army to have someone as the leader who is an expert in irregular warfare.”
    Bikram has served under officers like Generals V.P. Malik, N.C. Vij and J.J. Singh. “There are a lot of young colonels who never get noticed,” said Vij, under whom Bikram served at the headquarters during the Kargil war. “But he was hard to ignore. He was meticulous and always ready with details.”
    Bikram will inherit a deeply divided Army, which is hit by a number of controversies and troubles brewing within the ranks. General V.K. Singh’s fight over his date of birth, his shocking allegation that people within the Army plotted against him and the public spat that followed have made him lose the trust of a section of the government. Perhaps, that is why the government announced the name of the next Army chief three months before the incumbent’s retirement, instead of the usual two months.
    That, however, did not save the Army any trouble. As soon Bikram emerged as a frontrunner for the post, stories started popping up about his daughter-in-law being a Pakistani and a little-known NGO in Kashmir accused him of being involved in a fake encounter in Anantnag in 2001. It has sought a reinvestigation and exhumation of the body for a DNA test. A court has issued notices to the state government and the defence ministry to file their objections to the writ petition, which could be heard later this month.
    The timing and the relentlessness of the attack are stunning. A group of retired defence officers and bureaucrats, led by Admiral (retd) Laxminarayan Ramdas, has challenged Bikram Singh’s appointment. In a public interest litigation before the Supreme Court, it alleged that he was not fit to hold the office as there were allegations of him being involved in a fake encounter and his alleged low level of command over his troops who committed molestation and rape while he was posted in Congo on a UN peace-keeping mission. A more serious charge in the PIL is that, in 2005, General J.J. Singh prepared a succession list in such a way as to facilitate Bikram Singh’s rise to the top post in 2012.
    “It is unfortunate that some people have started a campaign against the new Army chief,” said Bakshi, who had staunchly defended V.K. Singh’s move to take on the government. “We supported V.K. Singh because we believed that he was right. We fought for the integrity of the institution. Now we should not make the whole issue a personal one. It will only harm the institution.”
    Bikram has his job cut out. Modernisation and operational preparedness of the Army will be his biggest challenges. “Our state of unpreparedness is stretched across the chain of command. Sadly, this is the same as Kargil operation when General V.P. Malik said the Army would fight with what it had. He should focus on these two issues,” said Vij.
    The arms lobby will pose another challenge to the new Army chief. Many in the defence ministry believe that the lobby has been behind the controversies that tarnished the Army and the ministry. General V.K. Singh’s actions against the land scams and Defence Minister A.K. Antony’s tough anti-corruption stand have apparently antagonised the middlemen, foreign governments and arms manufacturers.
    The problem is that it is former military officers or those who have contacts with them or the defence ministry who constitute the arms lobby. Almost all weapon vendors are represented in India by a local agent or consultant. Given their influence and clout, it will be a challenge for the new chief to procure modern and sophisticated weapons for the Army, keeping the deals clean.
    Bikram Singh these days travels frequently from Kolkata to Delhi, where he familiarises himself with the working of the Army chief’s office. He has met Antony and V.K. Singh, and has been briefed on the weapons procurement and the ongoing military engagements with different countries. In his characteristic style, he avoids attention and the spotlight. When a colleague called to congratulate him on his being designated as the Army chief, he said: “It is too early. Congratulate when I become the chief.”
     

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