Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Indian army set sight on loitering missile for its soldiers

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by Bang Galore, Apr 18, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bang Galore

    Bang Galore Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    603
    Likes Received:
    341
    New Delhi: The Indian Army is arming its infantry soldiers with a medium range loitering missile that can strike at a target after hovering over it for 30 minutes and sending in critical data on the enemy installation.

    The army has issued an open Request for Information (RFI) to major global defence companies seeking to know if they can supply a missile system with such operational characteristics.

    "The RFI has been issued earlier this month. The loitering missile is basically an unmanned aerial vehicle which can transmit data after hovering over a target undetected for about half-an-hour and later self-destruct on the target, inflicting damage to the enemy installations," an army officer said here today.

    Since India does not have an indigenous product in this range of armed UAVs, the RFI sought details on the product's cruising speed, maximum range at which it can engage a target, its loitering time, data link's range, capabilities to hit and accuracy, attack from the top, abort an attack after locking on to target and re-designating a target during a mission.

    Apart from seeking information on the radar cross section, the army has listed day and night camera payload, launcher, ground control station, data link system, and an inbuilt simulator as requirements for the missile system.

    The army would also like the loitering missile to have a conventional warhead, apart from anti-tank and anti-material
    warheads with deep penetration against armour capability.

    Globally, Israel Aerospace Industries and US' Lockheed Martin are the two major loitering missile developers and manufacturers.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  2. SpArK

    SpArK SorCeroR Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    4,159
    Likes Received:
    2,111
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  3. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,301
    Likes Received:
    192
    Now this Is What I call a Missile.... Stunning, truly Mind Blowing, When Is it getting bought and tested??
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010
  4. Dark Angel

    Dark Angel FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    1

    New Delhi: The Indian Air Force will induct killer drones within two years, providing itself the capability to hit high value targets such as enemy missile and radar sites, and even terrorist hideouts.

    A senior IAF officer said on Wednesday that Israeli-made Harop unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) would join the IAF by 2011 and it will enhance the war-fighting capabilities of the IAF, both conventional and low intensity conflict.

    Harop will be IAF’s first unmanned aerial vehicle for offensive strikes, though it already possesses a fleet of Searcher and Heron UAVs to perform surveillance and reconnaissance roles.

    The Harop will provide IAF the capability to take down enemy positions without having to send its manned fighter aircraft to hit ground targets.

    Developed by Malat, the UAV division of the Israel Aerospace Industries, the Harop UCAVs were bought by India recently through a reported $100 million deal for up to 10 drones.

    Harop, which is usually launched from ground- or sea-based canisters, can be adapted for air-launch too.

    Harop is an upgraded and larger version of the Israeli Harpy UAVs, an anti-radiation seeker designed to loiter, detect and home in on enemy radar positions which India had bought and inducted into its armed forces in the past.

    Unlike the fully-autonomous Harpy, the Harop is controlled in flight by a remote operator. Rather than holding a separate high-explosive warhead, the Harop drone itself is the main munition and is designed to loiter the battlefield and attack targets.

    The UCAV cannot only hit enemy radars by locking on to their radio emissions, but also has an electro-optical sensor that allows the remote operator to select static or moving targets in a battlefield.

    Harop, a 23-kg warhead, is 2.5 metre long with a 3-metre wingspan and has a six-hour endurance.

    Moreover, unlike the Predator drones being used by the US against the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan that can fire missles and return after a mission, the Harop is self-destruct, making them a more expensive option.

    The IAF officer said while efforts were on to develop indigenous UCAVs, India is “not very close” to have them in its fleet.

    “There are plans for UCAVs. But it will take time, as nobody is willing to give us the technology,” he added.

    The IAF’s procurement plans for UCAVs actually start in the 12th five-year plan that begins in 2012.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010
  5. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am not well informed on the drone technology. So pardon me if I sound stupid. When I read this thread few questions came to my mind. I am listing those questions here. Appreciate if anyone shed some light on this.

    Seems like this drone is designed to self-destruct on the target. Is there any variant available that delivers a high-explosive warhead to demolish the target and then returns to the base? Just like American Predator and Reaper.

    IAF is acquiring 10 HAROP systems for US$100 Million. What is the rationale behind this expensive purchase as they can be used only once, as it self-destructs?

    How destructive is HAROP? Is it capable of carrying convention war heads and detonate them on self-distruction? Say, if we use this against a terror camp will it suceed in wiping out the whole camp?
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010
  6. Skyler

    Skyler FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    4
    Buddy the problem with systems like predator or its advanced version reaper is that its too large and can be engaged by the enemy. The Harop is comparitively smaller in size. Yea the point tat U said about the UCAV returning to base is worth considering as there ain't much different in the cost of a Harop and a reaper. Harop must be worth roughly $10 mil. a piece( Calulated on basis of 100 mil. for 10 pieces) Reaper is worth $ 10.5 mil. a piece. But then i guess the cruz lies in harop's use to engage the enemy radar as pointed out by Dark angel. Please correct me if i am wrong ... but i dont think the Reaper currently has the capacity to carry out such a mission, which can turn out to be a force multiplier in case of a limited war scenario. More over India as such aint conducting any cross border raids which is exactly where the reaper would have been useful. We don't pursue enemies of our nation into other countries and blow them up:flame: ...(wish we could do tat thou ....:india:)
     
  7. SpArK

    SpArK SorCeroR Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    4,159
    Likes Received:
    2,111
    Do we have a UAV with missile capabilities like predator??
     
  8. Skyler

    Skyler FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    4
    No buddy we dont. Harop will be the first UCAV as and when we get its delivery. All our unmanned aerial programs revolve around surveillance and recon.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page