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Indian Army to Equip T-90 Tanks for Night Fighting

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by Bregs, Dec 5, 2016.

  1. Bregs

    Bregs 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    https://sputniknews.com/asia/201612051048193626-indian-army-t-90/


    India is trying to play catch up with China and Pakistan in 24X7 armoured warfare. Only half of India’s tanks are configured for night warfare as against Pakistan’s 80 per cent and China’s 100 per cent.

    New Delhi (Sputnik) – Night-blindness for Indian armoured formations will become a thing of the past as the army has revived the process to equip its main battle tank T-90 with high tech night visiion.

    The Army wants to procure 1,400 uncooled thermal imager-based driver’s night sight (DNS) with fusion technology for T-90 tank to assist the driver in tank operations at night. Indian Army plans to replace the existing image intensifier sights used in T-90 tanks in the next five years.

    “The proposed DNS will be a form-fit replacement for the existing Image Intensifier Sights currently used in T-90 tanks. It should facilitate driving during pitch dark nights with no ambient light. The T-90 tank driver should be able to clearly view the area in-front with adequate depth perception while driving over undulating terrain with the help of an uncooled thermal imaging sight,” reads the request for proposal document.

    The uncooled imager is less expensive and relatively maintenance free and are used for instant operations.

    “At present there is no Indian company which has the potential of manufacturing even in collaboration a DNS of the type that the Indian Army wishes to purchase. While Defence of Research and Development Organization has developed an uncooled DNS it is not clear if the technology has been shared with any Indian company,” says defense analyst Brigadier Rahul Bhonsle (retired).

    DRDO has developed uncooled thermal imagers based DNS for tanks of range up to 150 meters with field of view 45ᵒx34ᵒ.

    “This will considerably improve the night fighting capability by providing the ability to maneuver on the battle field under pitch dark conditions,” says Bhonsle.

    In November, the Indian Defense Acquisition Council (DAC) headed by Defense Minister Manohar Parrikar had cleared a proposal to procure 464 T-90 tanks from Russia at cost of approximately $2.1 billion. Almost 2,500 T-72 tanks currently serving the Indian Army need to be replaced by year 2020 but the delay in development of indigenous main battle tank Arjun MK II has forced Indian Army to increase its dependence on T-90s. Now, India plans to induct more than 1,600 T-90 tanks by 2020 that to be deployed in western front bordering Pakistan.
     
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  2. Skull and Bones

    Skull and Bones Doctor Death Staff Member MODERATOR

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    I thought T-90s are already equipped with Night/Thermal vision cameras.
     
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  3. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    People who have no knowledge of things write such stupid articles. T-90 has night sights already. It is the driver sight which is being upgraded.
     
  4. neil_diablos

    neil_diablos Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    I wonder why the article writer has equated requirement of night vision systems for the driver with the night vision system already available to the WSO. All modern MBTs come equipped with night vision.
     
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  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Is Russia's 'Deadliest Tank’ Using Western Technology?
    A new report highlights how Russia is circumventing sanctions to buy Western military equipment.

    [​IMG]
    By Franz-Stefan Gady for The Diplomat
    June 06, 2015
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    As I noted a while back, the T-14 main battle tank (MBT) is the crown jewel of Moscow’s future tank force. Its new design constitutes in many ways a clear break with old Soviet-era military hardware “and represent the biggest change in Russia’s armored fighting vehicle families since the 1960s and 1970s,” according to IHS Jane’s Defense Weekly.

    The T-14 Armata’s key feature is its unmanned remotely controlled turret (see:“Putin’s New ‘Wunderwaffe’: The World’s Deadliest Tank?”), and the location of the crew in an armored capsule in the forward portion of the hull. It also boasts a new automated ammunition feed system, and “high-resolution video cameras that offer its three-man crew 360-degree awareness around the body of the vehicle,” the Business Insider states.

    The T-14 is is the pride of Russian defense industry. However, if the recently published analysis of the U.S. cybersecurity firm Taia Global is correct, a crucial piece of the tank’s equipment – the night vision cameras – might not even be Russian-made!

    Enjoying this article? Click here to subscribe for full access. Just $5 a month.
    According to emails obtained by Taia Global (Russian hackers sympathetic to Ukraine hacked the email account of an Russian individual with apparent close ties to the FSB and provided the cybersecurity firm with more than 9,000 emails), the Russian defense industry is having difficulties producing thermal imaging systems like night vision cameras.

    The reason? Russia’s inability “to produce a critical component — microbolometer arrays — which can capture images without requiring cooling, reducing the size and complexity of thermal imaging systems,” The Intercept, an online publication that analyzed the Taia Global report, explains.

    The report quotes a 2013 letter written by Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister in charge of Russia’s defense industry (see: “Meet the Russian Politician Who Thinks ‘Tanks Don’t Need Visas’”) who stated that “at present, the Russian Army only has a few hundred individual imagers and no sighting systems and machine vision systems with advanced performance. On the other hand, our potential enemy troops — NATO, are equipped with hundreds of thousands of thermal imaging sights, sighting and vision systems.”

    Consequently, in April 2014, Viktor Tarasov, the senior manager of a subsidiary of Ruselectronics, a state-owned hodling company, wrote a letter to its CEO in which he asked to press the Russian minister of defense for money to buy 500 microbolometer arrays from a French company.

    The French company has denied selling Russia such equipment, although The Intercept notes that such actions are not without precedent: “Last year, Russian national Dmitry Ustinov was charged by the U.S. Department of Justice with using a front company, also based in Cyprus, to buy a variety of night-vision scopes and related equipment from the United States.”

    A number of other Russian military vehicles are using foreign technology. For example, the upgraded T-72 M1 is equipped with the French Thales Optronique Catherine thermal imager.

    Yet, according to Taia Global, the emails obtained from pro-Ukraine hackers uncovered a similar sophisticated operation aimed at acquiring “foreign technology critical to Russian defense industries by bypassing foreign sanctions.”

    So, if the Taia Global report proves to be true, the odds that the T-14s night vision camera, proudly displayed during this year’s May 9 Victory Day Parade, contains Western components are moderately high.

    As Jeffrey Carr, CEO of Taia Global, told The Diplomat in an interview: “We regularly see Russian research institutes conducting reconnaissance against U.S. companies who work on high value technologies such as lasers and other optical systems.”

    Of course, this does not mean that the T-14 will be less deadly on the field of battle. It, however, does illustrate that despite reports to the contrary, Western sanctions are slowly beginning to hurt the Russian military and Russia’s defense industry.
     
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  6. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Hacked Emails Reveal Russian Plans to Obtain Sensitive Western Tech


    Sharon Weinberger

    May 28 2015, 10:32 a.m.

    In April 2014, Viktor Tarasov wrote to the head of Ruselectronics, a Russian state-owned holding company, about a critical shortage of military equipment. The Russian military lacked thermal imaging systems — devices commonly used to detect people and vehicles — and Tarasov believed that technology might be needed soon because of the “increasingly complex situation in the southeast of Ukraine and the possible participation of Russian forces” to stabilize the region.

    Tarasov, in charge of Ruselectronics’ optical tech subsidiary, was hoping that the head of Ruselectronics would write to the minister of defense for armaments to advance his company 150 million rubles, then about $4 million, to buy 500 microbolometer arrays, a critical component of thermal imaging devices. The money, Tarasov wrote, would allow the company to buy the equipment under a current contract from a French company without the need for signing a new “end-use certificate,” which requires the buyer to disclose the final recipient.

    Time was of the essence, he warned, because the West was preparing another round of sanctions against Russia that would slow the purchases and increase costs. Tarasov also claimed that the United States was already providing similar equipment to Ukrainian forces. (Pentagon spokesperson Eileen Lainez confirmed that the Department of Defense had provided thermal imaging devices and night-vision goggles to Ukraine in 2014, along with a variety of other military equipment).

    [​IMG]


    From the “Business plan for commercialization of infrared photodetectors,” whose goal it is to supply vision systems for “the Ministry of Defense and other security agencies of the Russian Federation.”





    The letter is a rare direct acknowledgment of Russia’s military involvement in Ukraine, yet even more uniquely, it’s a window into Russia’s evasion of Western sanctions, at least according to the U.S. cybersecurity firm Taia Global, which acquired a copy of the text. The correspondence is part of a larger cache of more than 9,000 emails obtained from the account of Alexey Beseda, a key figure involved in the plan and the son of a prominent official in the FSB, Russia’s security service and successor to the Soviet-era KGB.

    In an email, Beseda insisted that his emails showed no wrongdoing. He declined to comment further on the record.

    Russians sympathetic to Ukraine hacked Beseda’s email, according to Jeffrey Carr, the founder and president of Taia Global, a four-year-old consulting firm. Taia has provided advice to multinational corporations and to the U.S. government, which has been critical of Russia’s actions in Ukraine.

    Carr, a longtime author and lecturer on cybersecurity and cyberwarfare, said he was given the emails by the hackers.

    The emails cover the years 2006 to 2014 and include a number of messages among key Russian business people that detail their plans to obtain the thermal imaging production equipment from foreign sources. Taia’s report based on those emails was provided to The Intercept — along with the emails themselves. The report says the messages show the Russian government is able to obtain “foreign technology critical to Russian defense industries by bypassing foreign sanctions.”

    Taia believes that efforts by Tarasov’s optical tech operation, Central Research Institute Cyclone, date back to 2013, when Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister in charge of Russia’s defense industry, warned of a critical lack of thermal imaging devices. “At present, the Russian Army only has a few hundred individual imagers and no sighting systems and machine vision systems with advanced performance,” Rogozin wrote to the chairman of the Russian Bank for Development and Foreign Affairs in a communication obtained through Beseda’s email account. “On the other hand, our potential enemy troops — NATO, are equipped with hundreds of thousands of thermal imaging sights, sighting and vision systems.”

    The reason for the shortfall was Russia’s inability to produce a critical component — microbolometer arrays — which can capture images without requiring cooling, reducing the size and complexity of thermal imaging systems.

    Shortly after Rogozin’s letter, the email correspondence shows that Cyclone established a new company, called Cyclone-IR, whose job was to acquire the technology needed for domestic production of thermal imaging systems. The company was set up as a joint venture of Cyclone and a new company called Rayfast, which was registered in Cyprus. Rayfast, in turn, was owned by three other companies.

    Taia alleges that Cyclone-IR then tried to hide its military links — since Cyclone is known as a military supplier — by changing its name to Photoelectric Devices LLC, whose website prominently features civilian applications for thermal sights, like firefighting.

    Several Western companies listed in the email cache as potential suppliers of sensitive technology to Russia denied doing any business with Cyclone or the companies believed to be associated with it. Ulis, the French maker of microbolometer arrays mentioned in Tarasov’s 2014 letter, said that it had not made any sales to Cyclone or associated companies. A spokesperson for Ulis said that Cyclone “is not a customer. On top of that, it’s not the type of company they wish to be associated with either.”

    Oxford Instruments, another company mentioned in the documents and correspondence as a potential supplier of photodetector equipment also denied doing business with Cyclone. “Oxford Instruments’ Plasma Technology business is aware of Cyclone and to the best of its knowledge, it has not sold any products or services to Cyclone or any of the subsidiaries you mention, and definitely not since the imposition of sanctions,” Rachel Hirst, a company spokesperson, wrote in an email. (One email to Tarasov from a Russian supplier refers to ways to deal with customs descriptions for Oxford Instruments’ equipment that is “for Cyclone.” The email is from 2013, prior to the imposition of sanctions.)

    Santa Barbara Infrared, an American company listed in the documents as a potential supplier, did not return email or phone messages.

    If Taia’s claims are accurate, it wouldn’t be the first time that Russia has been implicated in efforts to obtain sensitive imaging equipment from Western suppliers. Last year, Russian national Dmitry Ustinov was charged by the U.S. Department of Justice with using a front company, also based in Cyprus, to buy a variety of night-vision scopes and related equipment from the United States. (In one email with the subject line “related,” Tarasov sent Beseda a link to the article about Ustinov’s indictment.)

    Ustinov, a Russian national, was arrested in Lithuania and then extradited to the United States to face charges of violating U.S. arms-export laws. According to the indictment, Ustinov arranged to purchase night-vision equipment using the e-commerce hub eBay. Although it is not necessarily against the law to buy or sell night-vision equipment on websites like eBay, many of the items are illegal to export without a license. (The U.S. military also has been investigating some of the online sales, as The Intercept has previously reported.)

    Ustinov pled guilty, and was immediately deported back to Russia. The Russian government criticized what it called the U.S. government’s “hunt” for Russian citizens abroad.

    In the case of Cyclone, Taia’s analysis concludes the company was working with the FSB and that the “Alexey Sergeyvich Beseda is almost certainly an FSB officer.” That charge, Taia’s Carr concedes, is difficult to prove, and there is nothing in the emails that identifies Alexey Beseda as an FSB officer.

    Alexey Beseda’s father, Sergey Beseda is an acknowledged senior FSB officer, and has been accused by the current Ukrainian government of being involved in the deadly crackdown during last year’s Euromaidan protests. The elder Beseda is currently on the list of persons sanctioned by the U.S. government.

    It was Sergey Beseda’s involvement in Ukraine that motivated the hackers to target his son Alexey Besedov, according to Carr.

    Tarasov, the head of Cyclone, did not return an email seeking comment, and a spokesperson for the Russian embassy in Washington, D.C. declined to comment on Taia’s report.

    Karen Dawisha, a professor of political science at the University of Miami, said she wasn’t surprised by Taia’s report, or its findings. “We’re talking about shell companies — shells within shells of shells,” she said. “You can’t unravel that ball of yarn, and you can’t figure it out, because it’s all connected.”

    The type of front operation that Taia alleges is typical of how the KGB operated in the 1980s, when spies based in East Germany would use shell companies to obtain military technology from the West, says Dawisha, whose recent book, Putin’s Kleptocracy, details the close links between Russian power brokers and private industry.

    “It was Germany before, it’s Cyprus now,” she said.
     
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  7. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    The finest tanks are produced by USA only like the famous Patton Tank which were destroyed in large numbers by Indian RCL guns in 1965 & 1971 war.
     
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  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    If the Russians cant produce a night sight, one has to wonder what else they cant do.
     
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  9. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    They can't produce extremely costly precision weapons like USA but can create SVD-24 kind of computer which converts ww-2 dumb bombs into precision weapons.
     
  10. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    US has about a 20 year lead in technology over the Russians, . Plus the U.S. enjoys real-world battle experience and has an industrial, research complex that can build more advanced technology and sensors other wise Russia would not be having to buy obsolete French sights.
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Any one should be able to do that by now.. We were doing it long before the Gulf War.
     
  12. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Joint Direct Attack Munition
    (JDAM)

    [​IMG]
    GBU-31: A Mk 84 bomb fitted with JDAM kit
    Type Fixed target, precision strike, moving vehicle
    Place of origin United States of America
    Service history
    In service
    1997–present
    Used by See operators
    Production history
    Unit cost
    Approx. US$25,000 (Depends on acquisition lot. Foreign sales have considerably higher prices.)
    Variants See variants
    Specifications
    Length
    9.9–12.75 feet (3.02–3.89 m)
    Maximum firing range Up to 15 nautical miles (28 km)
    Wingspan 19.6 to 25 inches (500 to 640 mm)
    Accuracy Specified 13 meters; Realized around 7 meters
     
  13. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    How good US forces are has been proven in battle against ISIS. You are no where close to retaking Mosul while Russia will have Aleppo anyday now. That too with full support of CIA and NATO allies to FSA and other rebels. An Air force with third rate aircraft and junk bombs is flying a higher sortie rate compared to your outstanding marvels of technology and also winning the war. Time you changed your reading glasses.
     
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  14. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    You are wrong again. This bomb has pin point accuracy when fired as it somehow always locates friendly forces and strike them but it is way off the mark against enemies.
     
  15. T-123456

    T-123456 2nd Lieutant THINKER

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    The same system is and was used for Iran by German defence companies,it just proves that sanctions dont work when some parties find ways to ''work around it''.
     
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