Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Indian Higher Education Reforms, A closer look

Discussion in 'Education & Research' started by Agent_47, Dec 4, 2016.

  1. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
  2. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
    AICTE approves single entrance test for engineering courses from next year
    Admission to all engineering colleges across the country will be done through a single entrance examination from next year with the AICTE approving a regulation in this regard, sources said.

    The All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) on Tuesday approved a comprehensive package, including the single national test, for improving engineering education.

    The AICTE, which is the statutory body and a national-level council for technical education, also directed institutes to go for induction courses, yearly revision of curriculum and teacher training through SWAYAM platform, said a source.

    To implement the package Rs 250 crore would be spent, the source added.

    The Study Webs of Active-Learning for Young Aspiring Minds (SWAYAM) is a programme developed by the government to take the best teaching learning resources to all, including the most disadvantaged, by bridging the digital divide.

    Once implemented, the single entrance test will do away with the practice of multiple entrance examinations conducted by central agencies, state governments and private institutions.

    “The AICTE has come up with the regulation following a directive by HRD minister Prakash Javadekar. It will now be sent to the ministry for an approval. After that a gazette notification will be issued,” said a source.

    According to officials, the single test for engineering, as well as architecture courses, will be along the lines of the National Eligibility-Cum-Entrance Test (NEET), a single, all-India test for entry to medical and dental colleges launched in 2016.

    However, students seeking admission to the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) will have to clear the JEE-Advanced after taking the engineering entrance exam.

    “The AICTE has been advised to ensure that the examination process is standardised keeping in view the linguistic diversity of the country. The test will also be conducted multiple times every year,” said a senior official.

    Regulations have been issued under the AICTE Act making it mandatory for every state to follow it.

    Sources said in case a state refuses to adhere it, it will lose the AICTE approval for the institutes.

    “The aim is to make the process more transparent, standardised, and free of corruption and commercialisation,” a government official said, referring to allegations that some private institutions charge exorbitant capitation fee from students.

    India has more than 3,300 approved engineering colleges affiliated to universities, with an annual intake of an estimated 1.6 million students. But only about half of the seats are filled.

    The current admission process at the graduation level is dependent on performance in entrance examinations conducted by various agencies.

    The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) conducts the JEE-Main for the Centre-funded institutions. More than 1.3 million students write this examination every year.

    A number of states conduct their own tests while some grant admission based on marks obtained in class 12. Several private colleges also have their individual entrance examinations.


    http://www.hindustantimes.com/educa...m-next-year/story-AybOJRVJQVCBpnUhkhYYTP.html
     
  3. Golden_Rule

    Golden_Rule Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Messages:
    759
    Likes Received:
    725
    Outcome of Research is Knowledge - the most powerful weapon.

    No foreign university will ever let India gain leadership in knowledge as these universities have billions of dollars of endowment funds mainly created by global corporations whose sole loyalty is towards global profiteering. India will have to locally create the "right culture" for research to thrive. We have already proven it in several areas - ISRO, Missiles, Thorium reactors, Ayurveda, Spirituality, Vedas, Puranas, etc. Vedic Astrology is not one of the, but the biggest marvel of the world with such precise and complex calculations done millenniums ago.

    And research is no great thing - actually it is simple if done with a focused mind - you observe/measure, analyze, theorize and then postulate - the most complex and so called sophisticated of the technologies are based on this approach - down to Bosons. Nothing great.

    The greater effort is in focus, creating the right environment and culture, mentoring, leadership, visualization, motivation, reward, sincerity and dedication ...... bereft of politics, envy, stealing credit, discouragement, arrogance, corruption of every kind ...... It is not people, but the selfish and desperate attitude that is cultivated over time, that is the problem.

    I think it is a bad idea. Like I said above, foreign universities are not in the business of charity, but are in the business of making money, they fund full scholarship to these same brightest IIT'ians and others as an investment with a focused ROI.

    To set up a true world class research center in India, it would truly require several billions of dollars, which I do not think any university would be ready to invest. No way!! They may set up their shop here only to make quick money. Nothing more. Guaranteed!!

    Very bad idea. For 1.25 billion people, we need every kind of education in big numbers as well as opportunities either as jobs or as entrepreneurs. Education is very beneficial in building one's self esteem and setting one up for transformation for the rest of life. Remember, Change is the only constant.

    Very good idea. I understand that at IIT Gandhinagar, undergraduate students are allowed to create their own recipe for the courses to take over four years, or if one likes even more

    :biggthumpup:
     
  4. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
    Its ironic when you consider thousands of institutions are currently run for same reason "Money". But hay, foreign universities are evil !.
    Run for profit and quality education can co exist. Students will continue to go outside as long as we couldn't provide better alternative home.
    Like someone said "For god's sake, they want to give quality education to our children they are not setting up walmart". Debating for the sake of it.


    That's rather simplistic way to look at things. This same logic can be used to support foreign universities.

    Now at the quality of education, According to AICTE, More than 60% of the eight lakh engineers graduating from technical institutions across the country every year remain unemployed. India have 1.6 million engineering seats yearly which is highest in the world. Only half seats complete the course and a fifth remain in actual field they studied. Now what is the point of all this when you can't make them employable?

    Only 7 per cent engineering graduates employable
    engineering: 60% of engineering graduates unemployed


    From Yesh pal report on 'The Committee to Advise on Renovation and Rejuvenation of Higher Education’ - http://mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/document-reports/YPC-Report.pdf

     
  5. Golden_Rule

    Golden_Rule Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Messages:
    759
    Likes Received:
    725
    90% of the students who go abroad, mainly go for a better life style and money using higher studies as a conduit to achieve the desires which they cannot fulfill at home. The rest 10% who are really passionate on research, they definitely attempt to do it, and it is 50-50, half of them stay back and half of them return. I had a class fellow who was 7th AIHSC and was 47th in JEE, went to IIT Bombay, did his PhD from US, and returned to IISc Bangalore to pursue his post doctoral research. There are several like him. Most of the names of Indians who made it big in the US are the entrepreneurs. Several are in the universities and corporations too, but we know of the successful Indians in US mainly due to the success of those who succeeded in entrepreneurship.

    Read what Leslie Sthal said about IIT'ians on 60 Minutes CBS News - http://www.cbsnews.com/news/imported-from-india/

    Put Harvard, MIT and Princeton together, and you begin to get an idea of the status of IIT in India.

    Narayan Murthy's own son, who wanted to do computer science at IIT, couldn't get in. He went to Cornell, instead. Imagine a kid from India using an Ivy League university as a safety school. That's how smart these guys are. "I do know cases where students who couldn't get into computer science at IITs, they have gotten scholarship at MIT, at Princeton, at Caltech," says Murthy.

    "When I finished IIT Delhi and went to Carnegie Mellon for my
    master's, I thought I was cruising all the way through Carnegie Mellon
    because it was so easy, relative to the education I had gotten at IIT Delhi," says Khosla.

    These statements from Narayan Murthy and Vinod Khosla are a testament to high quality of India's undergraduate education. The problem arises with Grad schools and Research institutions.

    Big Indian business houses who have the capacity to invest into R&D do not have an agenda of research to create new technologies, instead they are mainly market, revenue and profit focused. Instead they use their capital to expand and grow. This is why higher studies in India are disenfranchised.

    The key to R&D done anywhere in the world is it's financial nurturing and the right environment (I mentioned in my earlier post) for it to flourish and succeed.

    My friend, you have at least a fifth who remain in the actual field they studied. In the US even that percentage is much much lower. Most recently I had in my company PhD's hired in Quantum Physics, Astronomy, Biotechnology to solve problems related to Data Science. So, let's be clear, the old fashioned trend to align education with profession is indeed changing. The question is whether the student is not employable or there are no opportunities for him/her to get employed? I think it is a mix of both. (BTW, you have to discount those percentage who get educated in madarsaas and walk into interviews with skull caps and burkhas on. And this is a huge number. Which company would want to bring this into their work culture?)

    Is it the case that there are business houses and they are not able to find a candidate with the right skill set or education and have open positions not getting filled? Nope. There are no opportunities. It is that simple. Let's not identify and blame the wrong variable. It will lead us in the wrong direction in finding solution; as it applies to research too!
     
  6. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
    In the context, When i talk about the engineering education (To some extend various committees). Im taking about the majority not the top cream of students who get in to Institutions of National Importance. I have no problems with IIT/IIS they only need right atonomy and funding to get in to top 200 institutions in the worlds. I have never heard IITans complaining about lack of job.When you quote Narayan Murthy and Vinod Khosla you ignoring the remainging ~1 million students who gets degree from some la-la university. Majority is the problem, they enter job market with no skills.

    About going outside, That is not the actual problem is it? Quality of eduction and opportunities are what matters and remaining 10% leaving is the problem.

    Not talking about specialization. Its about BE ECE graduate choosing TCS and CSE graduate sales.

    Yes exactly ! Ask anyone doing business in india or any entrepreneur. Lots of opportunities and no suitable candidates. Companies like TCS and infy build separate campuses just to make selected candidates employable !. Same goes with Bosch,accenture,dell or IBM. Modi opened an entire ministry to address the skiling of indian youth :fuu:

    http://www.rediff.com/getahead/slid...re-indian-graduates-unemployable/20140725.htm

    http://www.firstpost.com/business/b...raduates-unemployable-says-study-2753940.html

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...e-Education-minister/articleshow/53232738.cms

    Those india without opportunities are long gone friend now the problem is skill gap.

    I can imagine an NRI sipping beer and writing this :pleasantry:




     
  7. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
  8. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
    Modi government to replace UGC, AICTE with one higher education regulator

    NEW DELHI: Big-bang education reform is on its way – the Modi government is all set to scrap the University Grants Commission (UGC) and the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) and replace them with one higher education regulator, tentatively christened Higher Education Empowerment Regulation Agency (HEERA).

    The decision to go ahead with this radical change, long advocated by experts but never implemented, was taken after a meeting on education chaired by the prime minister in early March. If required, and since setting up a new regulator may take some time, amendments to existing rules will be considered as an interim reform measure.

    Senior officials who spoke off record told ET that work is on at a rapid pace to frame the HEERA legislation. The human resource development (HRD) ministry and the Niti Aayog are working on the new law. A committee that has, among others, Niti Aayog CEO Amitabh Kant and higher education secretary KK Sharma as members, is working on the detailed blueprint.

    Greater Synergy Among Institutions


    One senior official said replacing UGC and AICTE by a single regulator will be the “cleanest, most sweeping reform” that will “eliminate all overlaps in jurisdiction and also do away with regulatory provisions that may no longer be relevant”.
    While the idea of replacing multiple regulatory authorities with a single and streamlined one is not new – several committees including the Yashpal Committee and the National Knowledge Commission of the UPA era and the Hari Gautam Committee set up by this government have recommended the same – the reform never happened.

    Officials told ET that the new regulatory legislation is likely to be short and clean and will outline minimum standards focused on outcomes. They also said separation of technical and nontechnical education is outmoded and out of sync with global practices, and that a single regulator will bring in greater synergy among institutions and in framing curricula.

    HEERA is aimed at putting an end to the inspector raj and harassment that the UGC regime is associated with, another official said, but the new body will also be empowered to take strong penal action when necessary.

    Since bringing in new legislation and repealing AICTE and UGC Acts may be a time-consuming process, interim measures are likely and amendments to these Acts and modification of UGC regulations are among options being considered.

    http://m.economictimes.com/industry...-education-regulator/articleshow/59008312.cms

    Yaaay :cheers:
     
  9. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
    No top NIRF ranking, NAAC score? PhD admissions to get tougher

    NEW DELHI: If a university or higher educational institution does not figure among the top 50 in the national ranking or has a poor NAAC grading, admissions in PhD courses offered by it may get tougher as UGC has proposed making NET mandatory for the same.

    According to the new draft regulations by University Grants Commission (UGC), institutions which come under "Category III", would enroll only those candidates who have qualified the NET or SLET or SET examinations for their PhD courses only.

    As per the draft rules, a "Category I" university will be that which has been accredited by National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) with score of 3.5 or above or if it has achieved a ranking in the top 50 institutions of the government's National Institutional Ranking Framework (NIRF) for two years continuously.

    A varsity will be put under "Category II" if it has been accredited by NAAC with a score between 3.01 and 3.49 or if it has achieved a ranking from 51 to 100 in the NIRF ranking for two years continuously.

    All varsities which do not fall under Category I and II, will find place in the Category III.

    "An institution which is under Category III, only those candidates would be eligible for enrolling to a PhD course who have qualified the NET/SLET/SET examinations," the draft reads.

    The National Eligibility Test (NET) is an examination to determine eligibility for college and university-level lectureship and for award of Junior Research Fellowship (JRF) while States Eligibility Test (SET) is a state-level test accredited by UGC for eligibility of assistant professors.

    The UGC has sought feedback from all stakeholders to the proposed regulations by end of this month.

    Linking autonomy with ranking, norms on hiring foreign faculty and opening new campuses are among the key regulations highlighted in the draft

    http://m.economictimes.com/industry...sions-to-get-tougher/articleshow/59003315.cms
     
    Levina likes this.
  10. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
  11. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
    Can India build 20 Harvards in 20 years?

    Higher education in India is in deep crisis. Most Indian graduates are unemployable. Research in both the sciences and the humanities is generally below par. And even elite Indian universities do not make it to the very top of global listings.

    The Narendra Modi government is seeking to change the situation by establishing 20 world-class “institutions of eminence” around the country. The government wants these institutions to be free of regulatory shackles and requires them to be globally competitive. If these institutions develop and deliver on these lines, eventually driving innovation and economic growth, they could potentially mark the beginning of a new chapter in India’s nation-building exercise. If not, they will be the missed opportunity that sets back India’s aspirations to be a great power.

    Global leadership has been linked historically to leadership in ideas, especially in science and technology. Think of 19th century England or of the US in the 20th century. Indeed, one may go so far as to say that establishing leadership in education is an important turning point for emerging nations moving towards great-power status.

    China makes for a good example. Since the late 1990s, it has made a concerted effort to revamp its tertiary education sector and link it to state power, as detailed in its 10th and 11th five-year plans. China reorganized the sector by merging small institutions into larger universities, marking out elite institutions for generous state funding (the top 11 universities received more than $2.56 billion from the government in the first phase alone), and changed its focus from quantity-oriented deliverables such as enrolment numbers to quality-oriented deliverables such as citations in respected peer-reviewed journals.

    The results began to show in less than a decade. By 2003, China’s share of Asian science and engineering articles had increased from 14.54% in 1998 to 22.43%; its number of undergraduate and graduate students had been growing at approximately 30% per year since 1999; and by 2008, it was already churning out the largest number of PhDs in the world, as scholars Yao Li, John Whalley, Shunming Zhang and Xiliang Zhao note in their 2008 working paper for the National Bureau of Economic Research, The Higher Educational Transformation Of China And Its Global Implications.

    To be fair, there has been growth in India’s education sector too. Between 1950 and 2014, the number of universities has increased 34 times, from 20 to 677, while the number of colleges has increased 74 times, from 500 to 37,204, in about the same time, according to the Union ministry of human resource development. Unfortunately, a vast majority of these institutions are little more than rubber stamps on degree certificates that aren’t worth the paper they are printed on. There are many reasons for this but essentially they can be summed up as: an excess of regulation in the name of good governance. As the government sets up this new bunch of institutions, it will be interesting to see whether it addresses these fundamental structural problems that continue to hobble the Indian education sector.

    Take, for instance, the manner in which scientific study has evolved in post-independence India—primarily in research institutions not linked to a university. This was because in the early years after independence, the government of the day made a conscious decision to keep research institutes separate from universities which were meant to focus only on teaching.

    Indeed, there was a robust debate on this issue between Homi Bhabha and Meghnad Saha. The former pushed for stand-alone research institutes to which scarce resources could be directed in a targeted manner while the latter argued that scientific research centres should be housed within universities. Bhabha won the debate at the time, but today Saha seems to have been vindicated.

    Even though a handful of India’s scientific research centres, such as the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, and the Indian Institute of Science have done good work, the universities have suffered considerably. As Priyamvada Natarajan of Yale University notes, “the separation of research from teaching... has robbed the undergraduate curriculum of its richness...and it has impoverished universities by offering very little incentive to its faculty for becoming scholars, producing a disenchanted generation of academics”.

    In contrast, in the US today, research is integral to every university which serves as a hub of innovation and development. A commonly cited example of how research universities have incubated innovative ecosystems around them is that of Stanford University and Silicon Valley. Similarly, across the world in Israel, Technion University was the catalyst that sparked the start-up nation.

    In the long run though, it is important to mention that for any development in higher education to bear fruit, it will have to be supported by the strengthening of primary education. In fact, as Devesh Kapur at the University of Pennsylvania notes, “An important reason why Chinese higher education has galloped ahead of India is that it strengthened its primary and secondary education systems first, which India is only now attempting to achieve. Consequently, Indian higher education became a victim of distributional politics which China appears so far to have by and large avoided.”

    http://www.livemint.com/Opinion/Dxa4jkEotgOzlMYntSEI6N/Can-India-build-20-Harvards-in-20-years.html
     
    zebra7 likes this.
  12. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
  13. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
  14. NOODLER

    NOODLER FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    59
    Country Flag:
    India
    The HRD and Environment ministry are the MOST neglected portfolios in the government. Why cant we have someone like Dr Kalam in these important posts ? Even previous NDA had Dr Joshi as HRD minister. Who the phuck is smriti irani ?
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  15. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Country Flag:
    India
    Cabinet nod to special fund for secondary and higher education


    New Delhi:
    The Union cabinet on Wednesday approved the creation of a non-lapsible corpus fund for secondary and higher education, to help fund select education schemes for which demand exceeds budgetary allocations.

    The corpus—Madhyamik and Uchchtar Shiksha Kosh (MUSK)—will have all the proceeds from the 1% cess the government collects under the ‘secondary and higher education cess’ which has been in place since 2007, a cabinet statement said on Wednesday.

    To begin with, the fund may have a corpus between Rs3,000 crore and Rs5,000 crore, according to human resource development (HRD) ministry estimates.

    The fund will be akin to the Prarambhik Shiksha Kosh (PSK) already in place since 2005 to fund elementary education schemes such as Sarva Shikha Abhiyan (education for all). The government collects a separate 2% cess for PSK.

    The fund will cater to schemes such as interest subsidy on education loans, education credit guarantee fund, scholarship schemes, girls’ education schemes and a scheme that funds higher education in states.

    Money from the MUSK corpus will be an extra budgetary provision, meaning it would be utilized at times when demand for these educational schemes goes up and all budgetary allocations available with the HRD ministry have been exhausted.

    “In any financial year, the expenditure on ongoing schemes of the department of school education & literacy and department of higher education would be initially incurred from the gross budgetary support (GBS) and the expenditure would be financed from the MUSK only after the GBS is exhausted,” according to the cabinet statement.

    It will be a non-lapsable reserved fund, meaning if the amount collected in a year is not utilized, it would be carried forward. So far, there has been no such provision and cess collections are deemed utilized as part of the budgetary provisions.

    There is, however, some confusion over cess collection as most of the cesses have been merged with the goods and services tax (GST).

    “There are two possibilities—one, they may be talking about pulling in the old collections via that secondary and higher education cess, and second, the education cess is still prevalent in customs even after GST came in,” said R. Muralidharan, senior director (indirect taxes) at consulting firm Deloitte India.



    To be sure, MUSK was planned by the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government in 2010 but it could not muster inter-ministerial support, especially from the finance ministry.

    In July 2010, a draft cabinet note was circulated by the HRD ministry, proposing to create a non-lapsable fund in the public account called MUSK which would be a receptacle for the proceeds from the secondary and higher education cess. The views of concerned ministries viz the then Planning Commission, ministry of development of north eastern region, and department of economic affairs (DEA), ministry of finance were sought in this regard, the cabinet statement said.

    “The DEA did not agree to the proposal (in 2010) on the grounds that the budget allocations for the schemes of secondary and higher education have been far more than the amount of 1% cess collected. Therefore, the amount of the cess collected is deemed to have been fully allocated for the schemes of secondary and higher education in the respective financial years. Hence, funds on account of 1% cess for the past period are not available now for allocation,” the statement said.

    The cabinet’s approval for creating the corpus comes after the human resources ministry moved afresh on the scheme which had been on hold since 2010.

    http://www.livemint.com/Education/r...al-fund-for-secondary-and-higher-educati.html
     

Share This Page