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Indian Infrastructure

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by Naren1987, Jul 10, 2010.

  1. bharathp

    bharathp Developers Guild Developers -IT and R&D

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    wonder how this stacks up to the previous govt's investments in the same region.
     
  2. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Major Technical Analyst

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    Whoa, what a difference such small measures make! How rampant are these kind of efforts? Is this something that is beinf pursued across cities?
     
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  3. ranadd

    ranadd 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Think there are some projects like Jnnurm, Smart city projects tie into this.

    Mostly central government has put the ball in state government courts. You do it, We reimburse. All Government policies should be like that.
     
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  4. ranadd

    ranadd 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Lots of issues related to this. In most states there are local goons/politicians(All kinds) who depend on local business in busy areas. NHs mean new bypasses and flyover that might take the traffic from them. Already reading lots of push backs in few states.
     
  5. Zer0reZ

    Zer0reZ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Of 4,862 large dams, only 349 have emergency disaster action plans: CAG

    NEW DELHI: only 349 of 4,862 India's large dams have emergency disaster action plans in place, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India's performance report on flood control and management schemes of the Water Resources Ministry has revealed.

    "Out of 4,862 large dams, emergency action plans or disaster management plans of only 349 dams, which is seven per cent, were prepared (March 2016). Mock drill in respect of only one dam was conducted as of March 2016," a CAG report, tabled in parliament on Friday, said.

    The country's top auditor also revealed that out of 17 states or union territories selected for audit, only Himachal Pradesh and Tamil Nadu had carried out the pre and post monsoon inspection of dams while three states carried out partial inspections.

    On the safety of dams, the CAG said that Dam Safety Legislation initiated in 2010 had not been enacted till August 2016.

    Programmes for maintenance of dams were not prepared and adequate funds were not provided to carry out structural/repair works, the report said.

    "We found that in five large dams (two in Bihar, two in Uttar Pradesh and one in West Bengal) certain defects and deficiencies were pointed out during the safety review by expert committee but no remedial measures were taken due to non-availability of funds," it said.

    India has high vulnerability for floods as out of total geographical area of 329 million hectares, about 45.64 million hectare is flood-prone, said the CAG, adding that every year an average of 7.55 million hectares of land is affected, 1,560 lives are lost, and the damage caused to crops, houses, and public utilities due to floods is estimated at Rs 1,805 crore.

    Read more at:
    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...ofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
     
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  6. Zer0reZ

    Zer0reZ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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  7. Ankit Kumar 001

    Ankit Kumar 001 Major Technical Analyst

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    Ministry of Road Transport & Highways31-July, 2017 16:05 IST
    Highway Projects in North Karnataka

    Total 13 works amounting to Rs. 7216 crore are presently in progress in North Karnataka. These are scheduled to be completed between December, 2017 to March 2019. 8 works at an estimated cost of Rs. 1090 crore are proposed to be sanctioned during the current year.

    This information was given by Minister of State for Road Transport and Highways, Shipping and Chemical & Fertilizers Shri Mansukh L. Mandaviya in a written reply to a question in the Rajya Sabha today.

    *****


    NP/MS
    (Release ID :169294)
     
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  8. Ankit Kumar 001

    Ankit Kumar 001 Major Technical Analyst

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    Ministry of Road Transport & Highways31-July, 2017 16:07 IST
    Proposal for Conversion of Bengaluru-Mysuru Highway as NH
    The proposal for conversion of Bengaluru – Mysuru Highway in Karnataka as National Highway has been cleared by PPPAC Committee on 31st May, 2017 and the draft CCEA note is submitted to Ministry of Finance for approval. An amount of Rs. 16.74 crore has been sanctioned for carrying out maintenance work for improvement of the road. The estimated capital cost of this project is Rs. 6420.80 crore. Bids have been invited for procurement of executing agency. Construction work will take about 30 months to complete from the appointed date after completion of tendering process and finalization of agency.

    This information was given by Minister of State for Road Transport and Highways, Shipping and Chemical & Fertilizers Shri Mansukh L. Mandaviya in a written reply to a question in the Rajya Sabha today.

    *****


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    (Release ID :169299)
     
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  9. Ankit Kumar 001

    Ankit Kumar 001 Major Technical Analyst

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    Ministry of Road Transport & Highways31-July, 2017 16:06 IST
    Widening of NH 24 from Delhi to Hapur

    The widening work of NH-24 from Delhi to Hapur has been awarded in three packages; namely

    (i) Package-I: Nizamuddin Bridge to UP Border,

    (ii) Package-II: UP Border to Dasna, and

    (iii) Package-III: Dasna to Hapur.

    The scheduled date of completion for package –I and Package-III is June, 2019.The contract agreement for Package-II has been signed on 17th April, 2017. The completion date is 910 days from date of start/appointed date. For UP border to Dasna stretch, diversion of forest land has been approved.

    This information was given by Minister of State for Road Transport and Highways, Shipping and Chemical & Fertilizers Shri Mansukh L. Mandaviya in a written reply to a question in the Rajya Sabha today.

    *****


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    (Release ID :169298)
     
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  10. Ankit Kumar 001

    Ankit Kumar 001 Major Technical Analyst

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    Ministry of Road Transport & Highways31-July, 2017 16:06 IST
    Public Investment Board Clears the Phase-1 of Bharatmala Pariyojana

    The Public Investment Board has cleared the proposal for BHARATMALA Pariyojana Phase-I in its meeting held on 16 June 2017. CCEA proposal on the same is currently under inter-ministerial consultation. The total length of road to be constructed under BHARATMALA Pariyojana Phase-I is 24,800 Km with the following details:

    Economic Corridors - 9,000 Km

    Inter-corridor & feeder Routes -6,000 Km

    National Corridors Efficiency Programme - 5,000 Km

    Border & International connectivity roads - 2,000 Km

    Coastal & port connectivity roads- 2,000 Km

    Expressways - 800 Km

    Remaining National Highways under National
    Highways Development Project (NHDP) - 10,000 Km
    This information was given by Minister of State for Road Transport and Highways, Shipping and Chemical & Fertilizers Shri Mansukh L. Mandaviya in a written reply to a question in the Rajya Sabha today.
    *****
    NP/MS

    (Release ID :169295)
     
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  11. Zer0reZ

    Zer0reZ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Government to invest Rs 15,000 crore in 'strategically important' Andaman and Nicobar Islands

    Port Blair, Acknowledging the strategic importance of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, the central government plans to invest Rs 15,000 crore for various developmental projects here, it was announced on Saturday.
    Road Transport and Highways Minister Nitin Gadkari announced that out of this, projects worth Rs 10,000 crore have already commenced.
    The announcement came after Gadkari and Home Minister Rajnath Singh on Friday laid the foundation stones for a series of projects in the islands, a statement from the Shipping Ministry said.
    During the event, Rajnath Singh said the government was developing the islands while acknowledging their "strategic importance".
    He added that India was emerging as a powerful nation in terms of economy and security, and that no nation could destabilize it "as the government was strengthening the security on all fronts".
    The Home Minister added that out of the 1,382 islands in the country, 10 have been selected for infrastructure development, out of which five were located in the A&N Islands.
    Singh added that an Island Development Agency (IDA) has been created for taking care of the development and security of these islands.
    "A&N Islands may be far from New Delhi geographically, but are close to New Delhi emotionally," the statement quoted him as saying.
    Gadkari added that tourism sector had good prospects in the islands and that better roads, round the clock power and good hotels were needed to boost tourism, which will also generate employment for the youth.
    Among the projects for which the foundation stones were laid included rehabilitation and upgradation of NH-4 to two-lanes from Austin Creek to Kalara at Diglipur, and Beodnabad-Ferrargunj section of the NH-4 at Baratang.
    The Ministers also laid the foundation stone of major bridges over Humphrey Strait Creek and Middle Strait Creek at Baratang, the statement added.
     
  12. Som Thomas

    Som Thomas 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Why India is dredging rivers in Bangladesh
    Shantanu Nandan SharmaOct 08, 2017, 12.37 AM IST
    DHUBRI (INDIA-BANGLADESH BORDER): Pronab Payeng from Majuli is a navigator of SL Lohit, one of the five survey vessels stationed in the Brahmaputra. For the last 27 years — since he has been associated with Inland Waterways Authority of India (IWAI) — Payeng has spent more nights on the river than on its bank. He understands the pulse of the river, which singer Bhupen Hazarika once termed Mahabahu (the mighty); the Assam stretch of the river from Sadiya to Dhubri, for example, is 891 km long and 15 km wide near Dhubri, according to satellite images procured by the state’s water resources department. For hydrographic surveyors measuring the depth of the river through the thalweg survey, Payeng is an asset beyond his navigational skills. He can tell them with precision the locations where the river has turned shallow — Subansiri Mukh (Subansiri is the largest tributary of the Brahmaputra), Borgang Mukh, Bhekeli in Majuli, Orang et al. The thalweg survey duly confirmed what Payeng’s intuitive intelligence would only reinstate — a thalweg is the line of lowest elevation in a watercourse — necessitating interventions like dredging.
    [​IMG]
    The government of India in July sanctioned Rs 400 crore to dredge the Brahmaputra. Four dredgers have already been deployed and two more are being procured. Each dredger — including a cutter suction dredger (CSD), a tug (which pushes or tows the CSD) and houseboat (for night accommodation) — costs between Rs 35 and 40 crore.

    [​IMG]
    Then, New Delhi has tied up with the Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (Biwta) to dredge two river stretches — from Sirajganj to Daikhawa (175 km) in the Jamuna in Bangladesh (which is the Brahmaputra in India) and from Ashuganj to Zakiganj (295 km) in the Kushiyara, a distributary river across Bangladesh and Assam and a branch of the Barak river of south Assam. India has committed 80% of Rs 305 crore required for these two stretches; the remaining will come from Bangladesh. The contracts are likely to be awarded by the end of this year; Indian and Bangladesh dredging companies or their consortia will be eligible to bid, according to a senior IWAI official privy to the matter. The dredging in the Bangladesh stretches will begin by February-March 2018, with the contractors getting two years to dredge 2.5 to 3 metres of LAD (least available depth) in a 45-m-wide channel, with a binding clause of five years of maintenance.

    The Alternate Route
    If the two neighbours have their way, by mid-2020 India will cease to depend only on the Chicken’s Neck, the 22-km corridor near Siliguri in West Bengal that connects the Northeast with the rest of the country. Once the dredging in Bangladesh is complete, large vessels can move from Varanasi in National Waterway 1 (NW-1, the Ganga) to NW-2 (Brahmaputra) and NW-16 (Barak) via Bangladesh river channels, thereby reducing the over-dependence on the narrow stretch.

    “Dredging in Bangladesh will help reducing congestion in the Northeast,” said Nitin Gadkari, minister of road transport, highways and shipping in a detailed written reply to ET Magazine’s questions on the rationale behind India’s largesse to dredge channels in Bangladesh. The minister may not be mandated to talk in detail about the strategic importance of the alternative route, but India’s quest to build an alternative route, that too expeditiously, is only logical considering the recent Chinese military buildup at Doklam, to the north of the strategically-vulnerable Chicken’s Neck, on the pretext of expanding its road connectivity.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]Though there was an official “disengagement” in the area since August 28, recent reports suggest that about 1,000 personnel belonging to People’s Liberation Army are still stationed in Chumbi Valley near the Siliguri corridor.

    The river route will have economic spinoffs as well. “Britishers used cargo steamers for carrying petroleum, timber and coal products from Assam to the seaports through the rivers. But that route became redundant. Now, dredging in Bangladesh will once again make the river channels navigable throughout the year. Landlocked Northeast will then have access to the seaports,” says Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal. Siliguri corridor and will also provide an alternative route to the There will be dividends in terms of fuel and environmental costs, as one vessel with a capacity of 2,000 metric tonnes of cargo will keep as many as 200 trucks off the road. According to IWAI estimates, cost of water transport is the cheapest compared to road and rail (see How Waterways are the Most Economical). What is more, the luxury tourist vessels currently cruising from Varanasi to Haldia in the Ganga and from Pandu (Guwahati) to Neemati Ghat (near Jorhat) in the Brahmaputra could find new routes to sail.

    The existing Indo-Bangladesh Protocol route (1,647 km) connects Kolkata with Silghat (near Nagaon in Assam) and then Kolkata with Karimganj (south Assam). Under this protocol, the dos and don’ts of inland water transit and trade including customs checks, documentation, opening of branch offices, appointments of agents by vessel operators, transactions in the port of calls and the like are clearly defined. Under this route, ships are allowed to stop on a voyage only in key ports — Narayaganj, Khulna, Mongla, Sirajganj and Ashuganj in Bangladesh; and Kolkata, Haldia, Karimganj, Pandu (Guwahati) and Silghat in India.

    And it’s not that cargo vessels cannot pass through Bangladesh waters. Only four months ago, a vessel carrying iron rods from Kolkata sailed via Bangladesh to Tripura. There was plenty of excitement at Ashuganj port in Bangladesh, with none other than the shipping minister receiving the vessel.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    The Annual Deluge
    The problem, though, arises when water levels recede after the monsoons, making the river unsuitable for large vessels to navigate. That’s where the dredging is expected to play a pivotal role. The companies involved in dredging and building of river ports may find a new lease of life, as the NDA government is clearly betting on developing waterways as an alternative and cost-effective way of transporting cargo. The National Waterways Act declared as many as 111 national waterways encompassing 24 states in India, up from mere five waterways prior to April 2016 when the legislation came into effect.

    A Rs 5,369 crore-project to develop NW-1 from Haldia to Varanasi is currently underway in a 50:50 partnership between the Centre and the World Bank. The project, which will enable the movement of large vessels of 1,500-2,000 tonnes capacity, is scheduled to be completed by 2022-23. Similar projects are on the drawing board to develop the Cumberjua canal, and Mandovi and Zuari rivers in Goa (Rs 23 crore), canals in Kerala (Rs 1.6 crore), Gandak river in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar (Rs 12.91 crore), and the Rupnarayan river (Rs 24 crore) and Sunderbans Waterways (Rs 18.1 crore) in West Bengal; dredging will be a major component of all these projects.

    Harshvardhan Bhatnagar, president of Ardeshir B Cursetjee and Sons Ltd, a company established way back in 1810 that specialises in maritime activities including dredging, says that the company has been in talks with European and US dredger manufacturers to buy new-age machines. The company currently owns five dredgers. “We foresee opportunities for large and longterm contracts for dredging. They will offer a high occupancy rate of dredgers.” Bhatnagar adds that the company will compete for the work in Bangladesh only after understanding the terms and conditions.

    Can the dredging be a flood mitigating mechanism too, considering that an unstable Brahmaputra is one of the reasons for annual floods in Assam? Bhatnagar isn’t too upbeat. “Dredging in general is not a tool to control floods. The merits of dredging for flood mitigation will, however, depend on case to case.”

    Assam has witnessed four rounds of floods this year that killed over 150 people, and the CM is counting on dredging to alleviate flooding woes. “Dredging will reduce floods as the water-carrying capacity of the Brahmaputra will increase,” reckons Sonowal, echoing what he had said to this writer in an interview in July when the Assam flood was at its peak, and the towns like North Lakhimpur were almost submerged.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    The Sed ment Element
    In Dhubri where the Brahmaputra is currently the widest at 15 km, before it enters Bangladesh and changes its name to Jamuna, dredging was undertaken for a month last winter to facilitate a RO-RO (roll on, roll off ) service to ferry goods and passengers between Dhubri and Hatsingmari (the southern path of the Brahmaputra), a distance of 32 km; this made a circuitous road route of 220-km via Jogighopa redundant. The key part of the dredger — CSD-Mandovi — excavated sand and deposited it on a nearby existing sand shore with 200-m-long pipeline. But a 45-m channel being dug in a river that’s as wide as 15 km may be a totally different ballgame. Gadkari has talked about using the sand to build highways, but how feasible is that?

    Experts who ET Magazine spoke in Dhubri clearly say that there’s no way that the excavated sand could be thrown onto the side of the river. Also, while throwing away the sand, the pipeline contains 30% water along with 70% sand. This means that if the pipes are directed at the riverbank, they’re likely to create havoc for those living by the riverside. Chandan Mahanta, professor of civil engineering department at IIT-Guwahati, suggests that there should first be a pilot to judge efficiency of dredging before more dredgers are deployed. “To quantitatively measure the efficiency of dredging in the Brahmaputra, carrying out a pilot project in and around dynamic places like Majuli may be useful, if it’s accompanied by bank stabilisation. However, considering the enormous and continuous inflow of non-cohesive sediments, a comprehensive approach will be essential to make even localised dredging somewhat effective,” says Mahanta.

    The highways — and the sand for them — can clearly wait. The first priority is a waterway that connects the northeast to the rest of the country.

    Three men in a boat
    ET Magazine travels 1.5 km on a survey vessel down the river Brahmaputra

    SL Lohit is one of the five survey vessels presently stationed in the river Brahmaputra. The others are SL Subansiri, SL Barak, SL Dibang and SL Burhidihing, all named after Assam’s rivers or tributaries. Early this week, it began a seven-day-long journey upstream from Pandu port (near Guwahati) to Neemati Ghat (near Jorhat). It has two mandates. One, the hydrographic surveyors undertake a thalweg survey mainly to measure the depth of the river and spot the areas where the LAD (least available depth) is below the permissible level of 2.5 metres. Two, it escorts a two-storied river cruise vessel MV Mahabaahu that ferries foreign tourists from Guwahati to Jorhat, which touches the Kaziranga National Park, a sanctuary known for its one-horned rhinoceros.

    As Sandeep Kumar and Sonu Singhal, both hydrographic surveyors with a civil engineering background, switch on the machine in the airconditioned cabin of SL Lohit, they can read and record the depth of the river, the vessel’s location and speed, and also the route it’s taking. Near Guwahati, they find the depth of the river as high as 29 feet (8.8 metres). “The riverbed near rocky hills gets eroded over time, which explains the fabulous depth here”, the surveyors discuss.

    But the Brahmaputra has many locations with shallow depth, something that forces the government to contemplate the deployment of dredgers — six to begin with. For example, the surveyors of SL Lohit found many shallow areas in a survey undertaken only last month. Here are five locations with the least depth:
    http://m.economictimes.com/news/pol...rivers-in-bangladesh/articleshow/60987695.cms
     
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