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Indian Navy and The Pirates

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by Major Shaitan Singh, Oct 18, 2011.

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  1. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    Why is it not so hard to believe that terrorists from Pakistan can easily negotiate with the pirates and come through the coast?
     
  2. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    very possible,
    btw congrats on your 2000th post tarig bhai.
     
  3. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    NATO warships free Iranian, Indian
    vessels held by pirates
    NATO warships have freed Iranian and
    Indian vessels held by Somali pirates off
    the Horn of Africa, rescuing five Iranian,
    nine Pakistani and 20 Indian crew
    members, NATO said today.

    The NATO operation came days after the
    US navy saved 13 Iranian fishermen who
    were held hostage by pirates for weeks
    in the Arabian Sea, a rescue welcomed
    by Tehran amid heightened tensions with
    Washington.
    On Saturday, a Danish warship freed five
    Iranians and nine Pakistanis off the
    Somali coast after intercepting an Iranian
    dhow used by pirates as a mothership
    from which to launch attacks, the alliance
    said in a statement.
    The pirates tried to escape to the Somali
    coast but stopped when Danish navy
    snipers fired warning shots. A search
    team, backed by a helicopter, then found
    the 14 crew members and 25 suspected
    pirates.
    The crew members were not injured and
    "were given access to phone calls so they
    could give their relatives the good news
    of their release," a NATO statement said.
    The dhow was then able to continue its
    original voyage.
    The suspects have been detained aboard
    HDMS Absalon pending an investigation
    to decided if they can be prosecuted and
    a decision will be made "in the next few
    days," the statement said.
    The other rescue took place on Friday,
    when a US warship, the USS Carney,
    intercepted the Indian-flagged dhow Al-
    Qashmi off the southwestern coast of
    Oman.
    The 20 Indian crew members were freed
    and the nine pirates put on a fast boat
    carried by the dhow and given sufficient
    fuel, provisions and water to return to
    Somalia.
     
  4. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    With China watching, India & Seychelles to up anti-pirate operations

    NEW DELHI: Amid China's increased foray into the picturesque Indian Ocean archipelago nation, Seychelles has assured India that it remains its key developmental partner and sought to to intensify bilateral anti-piracy cooperation.

    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh held talks Thursday with Seychelles President James Alix Michel, who is here for the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit, that focused on security issues, piracy and ways to expand developmental cooperation between the two countries.

    "Both leaders reaffirmed their close and abiding relationship and India was acknowledged as the main development partner for the Seychelles," the external affairs ministry said here Thursday.

    "The two leaders also discussed issues relating to piracy and its consequent impact on security, tourism and fisheries," the ministry said.

    Michel expressed his gratitude for India's support for Seychelles development and in the fight against piracy.

    "Both sides agreed to continue their close cooperation and keep abreast of new developments in the region," said the ministry.

    Michel is understood to have briefed Manmohan Singh about new developments, including the context in which Seychelles last year offered China its harbour for use to refuel and stocking of Chinese warships stationed in the Gulf of Aden for anti-piracy operations.

    This set the alarm bells ringing in New Delhi, but Beijing later clarified that it will not be a military base, but just a refuelling and supply facility.

    Defence cooperation between India and Seychelles, the strategically-located island state, has been growing.

    Last year, the Indian Navy deployed a Dornier maritime surveillance aircraft in the Seychelles for conducting anti-piracy operations in the Indian Ocean Region. The aircraft, stationed at Seychelles' capital Victoria, would be operated by a Indian Navy crew on anti-piracy patrol duties in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR).

    Seychelles was one of the nations that joined the ambitious Pan African e-Network Project in its first phase, inaugurated in February 2009. The project seeks to bridge the digital divide in the 54-nation continent and bring tele-medicine and tele-education to Africans.

    With China watching, India & Seychelles to up anti-pirate operations - The Times of India
     
  5. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    http://www.indiandefence.com/forums/f8/indian-navy-pirates-12022/

    India, Germany discuss piracy in Indian Ocean, Gulf of Aden

    NEW DELHI: India today discussed with Germany piracy in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden and other issues of mutual interest during a meeting of its Navy Chief with Admiral Nirmal Verma here.

    German Naval Chief Vice Admiral Axel Schimpf is on an official visit to India during which he interacted with top Defence Ministry officials and service personnel.

    "In the meeting the two naval Chiefs explored areas of possible mutual cooperation and discussed several current issues," Defence Ministry officials said.

    Germany has also deployed its Naval force in and around the piracy-hit areas of Gulf of Aden in the Indian Ocean under the NATO flag.

    Admiral Schimpf also called on Defence Minister A K Antony and Army Chief General V K Singh.

    Indian and German Navy share a good military relation and have been involved in joint exercises and trainings.

    In 2008, the two Navies conducted joint exercises for the first time, following a Defence Cooperation Agreement between the two nations.

    India also operates German-origin HDW submarines which are scheduled to undergo upgrades with additional capabilities.

    The two countries also shares strong commercial, cultural and strategic ties.

    India, Germany discuss piracy in Indian Ocean, Gulf of Aden - The Economic Times
     
  6. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    China wants to partner India in piracy fight!!!

    China has said it wants to work with India and other countries to boost maritime cooperation, particularly with regard to coordinating naval escorts in the Indian Ocean to fight piracy.

    Chinese officials said they were particularly keen to increase coordination with the Indian navy, as naval officials from 20 countries met in the eastern port city of Nanjing on Thursday at the start of a first-of-its-kind two-day international initiative on ocean escorts, hosted by the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN).

    Geng Yangsheng, spokesperson for the Ministry of Defence, singled out India and Japan as two countries with which China wanted to increase exchanges and strengthen coordination of escort missions.

    The workshop in Nanjing, he told reporters at a briefing on Thursday, was convened with “a positive attitude” to improve the efficiency of international escort missions deployed in the fight against piracy, through greater exchange of intelligence, commander visits and joint escorts and exercises.

    He said the countries had agreed to follow an integrated escort schedule, arranged on a quarterly basis, with the schedule-making being led by “a reference country” chosen every quarter. China, as the first reference country, had already proposed a schedule, and other countries involved in the operation would formulate their schedules accordingly, the official Xinhua news agency quoted him as saying.

    This message of cooperation from China comes against the backdrop of its navy, which once limited its reach to protecting China's frontiers, spreading its presence with plans in place for the development of a blue water navy, even as the country's first aircraft carrier undergoes sea-trials.

    The PLAN has become increasingly active in escort missions in the Gulf of Aden, protecting Chinese vessels on a crucial shipping route on which China's energy imports depend. The PLAN also carried out a first of its kind operation last year in evacuating Chinese citizens out of Libya, underscoring its increasing willingness, and capability, to engage in operations beyond China's frontiers, although the country has a long-standing policy of not sending its military overseas.

    Since December 2008, the PLAN had deployed 10 navy flotillas, including 25 warships, 22 helicopters and over 8,400 officers and soldiers to the Gulf of Aden on escort missions. “It is in the common interests, as well as the common responsibility and duty, for us all to ensure the safety of ocean shipping,” Ding Yiping, PLAN deputy commander, told Xinhua.

    China's plans to rapidly modernise its navy have, however, stirred concerns, particularly in the wake of renewed tensions seen last year over disputes that flared between China and 10 of its neighbours over the South China Sea.

    The PLAN's increasing participating in escort missions in the Indian Ocean has also brought its ships closer to India's maritime boundaries, even as Indian ships are beginning to sail eastward more frequently amid the renewing of defence ties with India's East Asian neighbours.

    Last year, India stressed its strong support for the “freedom of navigation in international waters, including in the South China Sea”, after the INS Airavat, returning from a goodwill visit to Vietnam, was told over radio by an unidentified caller, claiming to represent Chinese authorities, to leave “Chinese waters”. Analysts here have stressed the need for greater communication, with the navies of both countries increasingly likely to encounter each other on the high seas. Defence exchanges between both countries only recently resumed, following almost a year of suspension over the stapled visa issue, and naval cooperation remains limited.

    Chinese analysts have pointed to joint anti-piracy escort missions as a possible platform to increase communication and build trust.

    Shen Dingli, a leading strategic expert and director of the Centre for American Studies at Fudan University, told The Hindu in a recent interview he did not see any frictions at present between the Indian and Chinese navies, and that it was natural that “both China and India would move around in the high sea area, in Pacific or Indian Oceans, for commercial interests and for protecting sea lanes of communications.”

    “If India still has concerns, invite China to [have] access to India's ports,” he suggested. “And India could have access to China's ports as well.”
     
  7. jamesvaikom

    jamesvaikom FULL MEMBER

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    China has an eye on Somalian oil fields. We should also do that so that we can compensate loss due to money spend to fight piracy.
     
  8. Steel

    Steel Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indian Navy succeeds in pushing back pirates



    The Indian Navy's action against the Somalian pirates off the Gulf of Aden has resulted in the seas on the Indian side being declared a safe area for merchant ships. "Many ships have been taking the route off the Indian coast after the Indian Navy's strong action against the Somalian pirates," said Captain Pottengal Mukundan, Director, International Maritime Bureau Piracy Reporting Centre (PRC).

    Speaking to TOI, Captain Mukundan said that there have not been any incidents of Somali type hijacking in Indian territorial waters though in the last year (2011), 450 crew members have been taken hostage in Somali hijackings of 28 vessels. The IMB's Piracy Reporting Centre has been monitoring piracy worldwide since 1991.

    While refusing to comment on the recent killing of two fishermen off the Indian waters by two Italian navy men abroad the merchant ship, Enrica Lexie, Captain Mukundan said that the law of the flag state prevails on the vessel. It is also subject to the laws of the coastal state in whose territorial waters the vessel is in. These laws determine the carriage of armed teams and the rules under which they operate.

    He said that the issue of armed guards to protect ships from piracy attacks is being debated at the UN's International Maritime Organisation (IMO). Further discussions are likely to come up next month as the several countries remain apprehensive on the issue of armed men aboard a merchant ship.

    The IMO had issued interim guidelines on the employment of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships transiting the high-risk piracy area off the coast of Somalia and in the Gulf of Aden and the wider Indian Ocean was approved by IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC).

    According to a recent global piracy report by the IMB, piracy on the world seas has risen to record levels, with Somali pirates behind 56 percent of the 352 attacks reported this year. But there has been a fall in the number of hijacking which IMB credits to policing and interventions by international naval forces. "Somali pirates are finding it harder to hijack ships and get the ransom they ask for. The navies deserve to be complimented on their excellent

    Indian Navy succeeds in pushing back pirates - The Times of India
     
  9. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Global agencies cool to India’s proposal on piracy

    India’s proposal that seas close to its western coast be removed from the list of High Risk Areas (HRA) for piracy has not been met with warmth by global agencies.

    After the piracy menace spread to near Lakshadweep, the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard had embarked on a sustained anti-piracy campaign in the East Arabian Sea. A top Coast Guard officer is categorical in pointing out that false piracy alarms received at the Mumbai-based Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) at the rate of one every fortnight not counting, there has been no incident of piracy in the region over several months in the past.

    Buoyed by the let-up in piracy, India unsuccessfully demanded a revision of HRA delimitation (return to west of 65 degree east longitude) at the Maritime Safety Committee of the IMO. But, BMP4 is an industry document, “not a matter for IMO per se,†said Natasha Brown, IMO’s External Relations Officer, in an e-mail to The Hindu .

    A key official at India’s Directorate General of Shipping rues that notwithstanding an advisory it issued cautioning ships against mistaking frenetic fishing activity up to 50 nautical miles from the country’s coastline for acts of piracy, cargo ships continue to transgress fishing zones, raising concerns. At least two recent incidents — the first, some 17 nautical miles off Vizhinjam in Kerala in November last when a cargo vessel resorted to firing to force a fishing boat alter course and the second, at the mouth of the Cochin Port in December when flares were shot in the air to distract a boat— point to the fact that conflict between fishermen and merchant vessels has sadly become the order of the day.

    The reason: the region is still designated a ‘High Risk Area’ as per BMP4.

    Jiyoung Kim, Foreign Affairs official of South Korea that chairs the CGPCS’ WG3, which worked closely with the industry in completing the BMP4 guideline, maintained that the appeal of India and Egypt for a revision of the scope of HRA would be discussed on an objective and transparent basis at Tuesday’s meeting.

    “It is industries, as editors of the BMPs, that define and revise the scope of the HRA… At the latest WG3 meeting, industries expressed that they do not consider the revision of the BMP4 including the scope of the HRA, in spite of the proposal of India and Egypt. WG3 chair suggested holding a meeting on the HRA within parties interested in order to continue the discussions on the scope of HRA,†he replied in an email communication.

    Separately, the Indian National Shipowners’ Association’s plea to the Joint War Committee, a forum of insurance undertakers based in London, for a review of the ‘Listed Areas’ for insurance set by Lloyd’s and the Joint War Risk Committee has not received a positive response. “The situation is being monitored but the area is unchanged for now,†Neil Roberts, senior executive-underwriting of Lloyd’s Market Association, confirmed in an email.

    The fallout of the classification was an exorbitant hike in insurance premiums of vessels bound for zones with enhanced risk. The premiums came down following deployment of armed guards on their ships, as most providers of security collaborated with insurance groups. “It is paradoxical that the short-term expedient, which has helped thwart pirate attacks, is posing other challenges, including legal issues,†said an industry observer.






    The Hindu : Today's Paper / NATIONAL : Global agencies cool to India
     
  10. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    ‘Piracy down, but naval presence vital’

    Piracy on the seas has dropped to a five-year low, according to the International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) annual report on ‘piracy and armed robbery against ships’ released on Wednesday. Only 297 merchant vessels came under attack during the last year as against the 439 vessels in 2011.

    The IMB, an arm of the International Chamber of Commerce, keeps track of maritime crimes.

    While the report attributes the welcome fall to a ‘huge reduction in Somali piracy’, it highlights the fact that East and West Africa continue to be dangerous for seafarers. Both these regions together witnessed 150 attacks last year.

    As many as 28 ships were hijacked by pirates last year the world over. While 174 merchant ships were boarded, 28 came under gunfire. The IMB’s Piracy Reporting Centre also recorded 67 attempted attacks during the year, said a media release issued by the agency.

    “The number of people taken hostage onboard fell to 585 from 802 in 2011, while a further 26 were kidnapped for ransom in Nigeria. Six crewmembers were killed and 32 were injured or assaulted,†the release noted.

    The let-up in piracy notwithstanding, crew of merchant ships must remain vigilant, particularly in the waters off East and West Africa, said IMB Director Captain Pottengal Mukundan.

    Somalia and the Gulf of Aden, which account for nearly a quarter of the world’s piracy incidents, reported attacks on 75 ships last year as against 237 such incidents during 2011.

    According to the IMB, formidable naval patrol, pre-emptive strikes against mother ships, deployment of private armed guards and the application of ‘Best Management Practices’ worked against pirates off Africa’s east coast.

    But the threat of Somali pirates remains strong. “The continued presence of the navies is vital to ensuring that Somali piracy remains low,†said Captain Mukundan.

    As on December 31, Somali pirates held 104 mariners hostage on eight ships, while 23 more were detained on land, pending negotiations for their release.

    Link
     
  11. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Re: ‘Piracy down, but naval presence vital’

    Agreed
     
  12. karan2

    karan2 FULL MEMBER

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    Pirates offer to free 46 Indians for 120 Somalis

    MUMBAI: As the trial of 120 Somali pirates begins in Mumbai, the Indian government has received a communication from sea brigands in the north-east African nation offering the release of 46 Indian sailors held hostage in return for the captured pirates' freedom.

    The message proffering a swap was sent mid-January to the Union ministry of shipping, said security establishment sources. It came days before the trial of 120 pirates started in a Sewri fast-track court on January 21. Worried by the bargain proposal, the additional chief secretary (home ministry) recently held a meeting in Maharashtra with officials of the directorate-general of shipping and two senior police officers, a source said.

    "The Somali pirates are blackmailing the Indian government. They have declared that they will release the Indian sailors—most of whom hail from Gujarat and Kerala—if their 120 associates are released by the government," said the source. The Indian seafarers, it is believed, were taken prisoner in various attacks.

    "It will be the decision of the court looking at the pirates' crimes," said the source. "They are facing charges of waging war against the nation, kidnapping, murder, smuggling arms and ammunition, attempt to murder, apart from several charges under sections of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act."

    The 120 pirates being tried in Mumbai were captured by the Indian Navy in numerous raids. Around 60 of them were caught in March 2011 when naval ships intercepted the pirate mother vessel, Vega 5, in the Arabian Sea about 600 nautical miles west of India. Some others were netted when the Navy launched an assault to free the fishing trawler Al Murtaza that was captured by Somali pirates. In these and other raids about 70 hostages belonging to Thailand, Philippines, Bangladesh, Iran, Turkey, Myanmar and Pakistan were rescued and 11 AK-47 rifles with magazines, 10 AK-47s without magazines and two rocket-launchers were seized.

    The Yellow Gate police have filed four chargesheets, each about 500-pages long against the 120 pirates, 16 of whom face murder charges.
    Pirates offer to free 46 Indians for 120 Somalis - The Times of India
     
  13. karan2

    karan2 FULL MEMBER

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    At mercy of Somali pirates, Indian sailors recall agony

    Six Indian sailors onboard MV Iceberg I, which was in captivity of the Somalian pirates for two years and nine months — the longest hijack on Somalian waters — on Sunday, narrated horrifying experiences of the tortures they faced at the hands of the hijackers.
    Apart from being driven to starvation, the sailors faced betrayal from their management and also witnessed the death of a co-worker.
    MV Iceberg 1 was hijacked by 24 crew members on March 29, 2010. It had sailors from six countries — eight from Yemen, six from India, five from Ghana, two each from Sudan and Pakistan and a Filipino.
    Unable to bear the physical and mental torture Wagdi Akramm their fellow sailor jumped overboard on October 27, 2010. “A group of pirates, who were approaching the vessel spotted Akram jumping; they brought him back aboard, but he had died by then,” said Ganesh Mohite, one of the sailors.
    The crew requested the pirates to send the body to his family, but their pleas were turned down. As diesel was in stock, the pirates restarted the freezer meant to store meat and preserved his body. Four months later, after they ran out of diesel, they decided to dispose Akram’s body.
    Recalling the dark days, Swapnil Jadhav said, “Later, news came in that the shipping company was unwilling to pay the ransom and that they did not care if the ship was destroyed or if the crew died.”
    “The pirates showed us the news of a group of 60-80 pirates being arrested by the Indian Navy and asked us to inform the Indian government to free the arrested or else threatened us with dire consequences,” said Santosh Kumar Yadav, an oiler on the ship.
    The chief officer Dhiraj Kumar Tiwari too was physically tortured repeatedly by the pirates; one day, he suddenly disappeared from the vessel. The sailor is still reportedly missing.
    On another occasion, the pirates held the crew at gun-point so that they could hijack another merchant vessel.
    The situation worsened when Puntland Maritime Forces intervened to free the 22 sailors. While the pirates were counter firing, the sailors were forced to lie on the floor; the bullets were passing just inches above them, the sailors claimed.
    During the 13 days of crossfiring, Mr Jadhav was hit once, and had to do without any medical help for four days. Finally on December 23, 2012, the pirates gave up and Mr Jadhav got the much needed medical aid.
    Dr Harish Shetty, psychiatrist, who is counselling the sailors and their families, said, “These sailors do not know whether they should continue with their profession.”
    Chirag Bahri, regional director, Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme, added, “We had a meeting with authorities who are ready to provide jobs either onboard or at shore depending on what the sailors want to do.”

    At mercy of Somali pirates, Indian sailors recall agony | The Asian Age
     
  14. indochina

    indochina IDF NewBie

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    And we will have the Indian Ocean pirates?
     
  15. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Seeking assurance, kin of abducted Indian crew begins protest



    Beginning their indefinite protest in front of Transport Bhavan here on Monday, parents and family members of the 17 Indian crew members on board chemical tanker MT Royal Grace — which was hijacked on March 2 near Oman by Somali pirates last year – have said that this is a “do or die situation for them now.” “We have been practically begging the government to help us for over a year now and we have not even got a definite assurance about the safety of our boys. This time if the government does not relent we will start a hunger strike here. If the government is okay about allowing our children to die on the hijacked ship we will be forced to do the same here in Delhi,’’ said Sushil Kumar, whose 23-year-old brother Saurav Kumar is among the kidnapped crew.

    Stating that it was the “we don’t care” attitude of the government that had forced them to take to the streets, Mr. Kumar added: “In fact last December, government officials met us and told us to go back home and pray for our loved ones. They even sanctioned money to each family. We don’t want the money we just want an assurance from the government that our loved ones are safe and that the government is working actively to bring them back.’’ Ainul Haque from Allahabad, whose 26-year-old brother Shahid Babu is also among those kidnapped, said: “The last contact that we had with Shahid and the others who are being held hostage was in November-December when the Somalian threatened to kill all the Indian hostages unless we paid them the ransom.’’ “We now left with no choice but to gather here and demand that the government wake up to our plight and give us some positive news about our family members,’’ added Haque. “The owner of the ship has abandoned us and the pirates are asking for a ransom of over Rs. 1.5 million which we don’t have.”

    Mundresh, who is also protesting for the release of her brother, said: “We feel helpless now and when we get news about our loved ones having no food, water and sanitation facilities and being forced to endure extreme heat we fear the worst for them. We yet again appeal to the government to take a sympathetic view and help us.’’



    Seeking assurance, kin of abducted Indian crew begins protest - The Hindu
     
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