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Indian Navy in talks to get underwater rescue ship from Russian shipyard

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by Agent_47, Jun 28, 2017.

  1. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    St Petersburg: The Admiralty Shipyards in Russia has produced most of the submarines that are in the Indian Navy – from the Foxtrot class that has been retired, to the Kilos that still form the bulk of the fleet. The Russian shipyard is now in advanced talks with the Indian Navy for an underwater rescue vessel that can be the difference between life and death for the crew of a crippled submarine.

    The top executive of the Admiralty shipyard told The Print that price negotiations are currently on with the Indian Navy for a new rescue vessel with the two sides having overcome all other technical issues. The Igor Belousov class rescue vessel will be designed for rescue operations on conventional and nuclear-powered submarines – a fleet that is set to grow exponentially over the next decade in the Indian Navy.

    “There were some technical issues that we have discussed and overcome. Now we are discussing the pricing. We are hopeful that we will soon win the contract,” Alexander Buzakov, Director General of the Admiralty shipyard, said.

    The Russian ship is designed to carry out rescue operations – providing air and supplies to a crippled submarine as well as operating vessels close to it – up to a depth of 1000 meters. Designed to operate in rough seas up to sea state 7, the Russian Navy has one such rescue ship operational and is likely to order four more for its fleet.

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    A file image of the Igor Belousov class vessel that the Indian Navy is in talks to obtain.
    India has a dire need for a submarine rescue vessel and for years has operated without adequate rescue gear in case of an accident at sea. After two major accidents on-board submarines in the preceding years raised eyebrows, the Navy last year finally ordered two British-made submersibles that can be used for rescue operations. The James Fisher Defence submersibles can rescue 16 sailors at a time from a depth of 16 meters, but need a vessel to be operated from.

    The Russian shipyard said that the concerns India had about housing the British submersible with the Igor Belousov class rescue ship have been resolved.

    “The Indian side wanted to know if additional rescue equipment could be added to the ship. We have now confirmed that the British submersible vessel can be integrated,” Buzakov said.

    The vessel is important for India given its plans to operate a fleet of at least 6 nuclear-powered attack submarines and an equal number of nuclear-armed submarines in the coming years. The lack of a rescue vessel has been sorely felt. During the extensive sea trials last year of the INS Arihant – India’s first nuclear missile-armed submarine – a Russian naval vessel had to be engaged as backup in case of any emergency.

    (The correspondent is in Russia on the invitation of the state owned United Shipbuilding Corporation)

    https://theprintbeta.in/2017/06/28/...n-shipyard-that-built-most-of-its-submarines/
     
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  2. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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  3. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Major Technical Analyst

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    Hmm, surely a number of Indian shipyards could have built such vessels with designs from NDB?

    British DSRV on a Russian rescue ship is a sad story for the supposedly self-reliant IN.

    + at least 2 of these should be procured, can't risk having the entire sub fleet dependant on just 1 of these.
     
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  4. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Major Technical Analyst

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    DSAR 500
     
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  5. Fox

    Fox Supreme Overlord FULL MEMBER

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    Fancy stuff there. We co-own the NSRS DSRV alongside France and the UK. It's certified to work with any NATO submarine and even Russian ones. In 2012 Norway deployed "Nemo" - that's the DSRV's name - to the Mediterranean where it received Russian VIPs including General Nikolai Makarov, Chief of Defence Staff of the Russian Armed Forces from a Russian Navy Kilo class submarine (B-871 Alrosa) taking part in the exercise.

    I was kind of hoping we were using the same model.

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    S303 would be this submarine.

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    The NSRS is a development of the British LR5, which is why I was thinking it could be the same or a similar British make.

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    Last edited: Jun 28, 2017
  6. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    These are specialised vessels which we never operated in the first place. It's better to go for best in the world for matters like this.
    Is it two per ship?
     
  7. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Major Technical Analyst

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    Yes that's very true, this is speclialist stuff and you would want to have a dependable design from the outset, can't take risks with these sorts of vessels.

    Hopefully the NDB will take some notes and when the rescue fleet is expanded the follow on vessels are Indian designed and made.

    Just one, so I guess one of the DSAR 500s will be with the rescue ship and the other could be at Hindon AFB co-located with the 81 SQN (C-17s)?
     
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  8. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    "The ships displacement is about 6,000 ton and it includes a deep divers complex, two unmanned submersibles and rescue equipment. We would of course have no objections if the Indian side wants to equip the ship with submersibles of a different company," Buzakov said.

    The top executive confirmed that the ship can perform rescue missions on both nuclear and conventional submarines. Russian engineers have also solved the tricky rescue problem that occurred when the Kursk submarine sank with 118 hands in 2000.

    "It is no secret that in the Kursk incident, the conning tower had got twister and there was no chance to mate the rescue vessel with the tilted structure. Now, this problem has been solved with new technology on the P 21300," Buzakov says.

    How do you deploy the DSAR after transportation using C17? Still need a ship rite? How about sea plane like US-2?
     
  9. Fox

    Fox Supreme Overlord FULL MEMBER

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    I don't think that's accurate, Mr Buzakov. The recovered vessel doesn't show major damage or twisting to the tower.



    Capture.JPG

    Kursk was listing, but that wouldn't have prevented LR5 from mating with the vessel.

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    Not only that, but Norwegian rescue crews, once they were finally given clearance to approach the vessel, were able to pop open hatches on the submarine and survey it from within. The problem? The escape hatch, so called rescue trunk (9th camber - closest to the propeller), was flooded (during a rescue internal and external pressure need to be equalized). Entering via the tower wouldn't have been viable as a rescue measure because of flooding and damage in the bow section, not because of damage to the tower itself.

    http://www.nrpa.no/dav/3b3a226c34.pdf

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    That doesn't mean attempts were made to go through the bow or tower though. Norwegian rescue crews initially had asked for permission to attempt a breach through the exposed bow, but the Russians placed restrictions on them, such as they couldn't enter the submarine during any body recovery operation, they only had access during the initial sweep for survivors in the 9th compartment.

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    Kursk turned into the tragedy it did largely because it took 5 day for Putin to authorize a rescue attempt by Norway and the UK, who were equipped to attempt a rescue where as Russia wasn't. It wasn't because of damage to the tower preventing a DSRV from docking. No such issue was reported.

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    TL;DR - when Norway asks "let us help", let them help.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2017
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  10. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Navy Sailors Train On 1,900-Crore Rescue Submarines That India Is Buying

    Twenty four officers and sailors from the navy are now training on the world's most advanced rescue submarines in Scotland with systems that India has sought for decades - state-of-the-art technology and equipment that can be used to save sailors trapped underwater in submarine catastrophes.
    Last year, the government signed a 1,900-crore deal with a British firm for the supply of two complete submarine rescue systems and navy personnel have now begun training on the system in Fort William, Scotland before they are delivered to India next year. The submarine rescue kits which include two Deep Search and Rescue Vehicles (DSRV) or mini-submarines will be positioned in Mumbai and Visakhapatnam where the Indian Navy bases its 14 conventional and 2 nuclear powered submarines.

    So far, the navy has relied on a 1997 contract with the US for help in case an Indian submarine has an accident underwater. In the event of such a crisis, the US Navy would fly out its own DSRVs on massive transport aircraft before they are transferred to a ship which would need to sail out to the site of the submarine accident, a time-consuming affair that could cost lives. Now, with its dedicated kit, the Indian Navy will be self-reliant and able to quickly deploy its submarine rescue systems on board ships or fly them out on the Indian Air Force's own C-17 heavy transport jets. According to James Fisher, the manufacturer of the UK submarines that India is buying, "The innovative design and tightly integrated components [of the system being sold to India] will ensure Time-to-First-Rescue - the time measured between deployment of the system and commencement of the rescue itself - is minimised. The systems are heavily optimised for ease of transport and speed of mobilisation to a Vessel of Opportunity."

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    Indian Navy submariners training at Fort William in Scotland.

    The two rescue submarines are designed to dock with the hatches of a submarine in distress at depths upto 650 metres, more than three times the operating depth of the rudimentary rescue "bells" which are containers that can be lowered to the submarine in distress and which the navy can operate from its diving support ship, the INS Nireekshak. This ship was originally meant for offshore oil exploration work but was commissioned in 1989 by the cash-strapped navy for SOS operations.
    Each "bell" can rescue only a handful of sailors in each rescue attempt. The new rescue submarines being acquired by the navy function independent of the mothership, can locate and engage in a rescue mission more effectively, and rescue a greater number of sailors in each operation.


    In August 2013, the INS Sindhurakshak, a Russian built "Kilo" class submarine, sank at the Naval dockyard after an explosion on-board in which 18 sailors were killed. In February 2014, a pair of Lt. Commanders of the Indian Navy were killed after smoke engulfed a compartment of another Indian Navy "Kilo'' class submarine, the INS Sindhuratna, during a training mission off the coast of Mumbai. This prompted the then Navy Chief Admiral DK Joshi to resign while taking responsibility for other accidents in the navy during his watch.

    https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/nav...766859?type=news&id=1766859&category=AllIndia

    @Abingdonboy @PARIKRAMA @Gessler @GSLV Mk III
     
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  11. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    [​IMG]
    INS Nireekshak
     

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