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Indian Navy Soon To Be The Most Formidable Submarine Force On The Planet! Here's What You Need To Kn

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by Vidyanshu, May 16, 2015.

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  1. Vidyanshu

    Vidyanshu Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The most important thing about having nuclear weapons is a second strike capability. In a nuclear conflict, one who strikes first may win the war, but one who strikes second makes sure there is no one left to celebrate the win. That’s nuclear deterrence in a nutshell. While it sounds easy in theory, building a nuclear doctrine with a working second strike capability is anything but. India, for example, has declared a no-first-use of nuclear weapons. Which means, that though India will not initiate a nuclear conflict, if attacked it will retaliate with such ferocity, that it will wipe the enemy off the face of the map. How does India intend to do this? Like any other superpower, India wants to use submarines.

    Submarines for projection of power

    [​IMG]

    thehindu

    If you think about it, submarines are the perfect weapons. Lurking in the depths of the oceans, they move around without being detected and surface to launch the attack on the unsuspecting enemy. Erstwhile superpowers USA and Russia continue to use their SSBNs (ballistic missile submarines) to great effect, projecting their might even today. These SSBNs ensure that even though the land-based missiles and airplanes may have been taken out, the enemy is guaranteed a sending off that it will never forget. And if India wants to be taken seriously on the world stage, it will have to start acting like a superpower, by being able to extend the country’s power across the globe. These submarines are therefore just what India needs.

    Current state of submarine force

    The current state of the Navy’s underwater fleet is, for lack of a better word, worrisome. India currently has 9 Sindhughosh class (Soviet Kilo class) and 4 Shishumar-class (German HDW Type 209) diesel electric subs and a single nuclear powered INS Chakra (Akula II class) sub. For a country with a coastline that measures more than 7,500 km, a fleet of 15 submarines is just not enough. And 15 isn’t the actual number of subs available for duty, because some of them are in ports for refits and maintenance. In comparison, China has a total of 67 submarines in its Navy.

    Nuclear Submarine Program

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    hisutton.com

    India started building its first nuclear submarine, the INS Arihant, under the highly secretive ATV program. In fact the project was such a secret, that it wasn’t until July 2009, when it was actually launched, that it was even officially acknowledged to exist. Work though had started back in the 80s, with Soviet help, to build a nuclear powered hunter-killer sub. India also leased a Charlie-I sub named the INS Chakra between 1987 and 1991 to gain experience in operating nuclear subs. The ATV though moved on from being an attack sub to a ballistic missile carrier as India conducted the second set of nuclear tests in Pokhran. The biggest challenge faced was in miniaturising the Pressurised Light Water Reactor which could fit in the tight confines of the sub’s hull. Based on a Russian design, a land-based version was built by BARC before the actual reactor, of a reported 83 MW capacity, was placed in the sub.

    The INS Arihant, after launch in 2009, went through an extensive set of tests including harbour acceptance trials with the on-board reactor going critical in 2013. But it was only in December 2014 that it left the harbour for its sea trials. The Navy Chief, Admiral R K Dhowan, had recently stated that the sea trials of the sub are going “very well”, but refused to give a deadline for their completion.

    [​IMG]

    wikimedia commons

    According to reports, the Arihant should be commissioned by the end of this year, after which it can be put on active patrol duty. But before that can happen, it will have to integrate its primary weapon, the K-15 SLBM (Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile). The Arihant will carry up to 12 of these nuclear capable missiles with a range of 750 km. While this reach is quite low to hit deep inland targets from the middle of the seas, another missile, the K-4 with a range of 3,500 km is also in the works. In fact, a test of the K-4 has reportedly been carried out in secret. Beyond these, the K-5 missile, with a range of 5,000 km, is also being planned. The latter will likely be deployed with MIRVs (Multiple Independently Targetable Reentry Vehicle) which give each missile the ability to target up to four or more targets.

    Although the INS Arihant can carry either 12 K-15s or 4 K-4s, the 3 boats which will follow, will be able to carry up to 8 K-4s or 24 K-15s. The next one will be christened INS Aridhaman. And since the rest of the Arihant-class boats will be bigger than the lead boat, they are also expected to have a more powerful nuclear reactor. The crews for these missile carriers are gaining experience in operating nuclear boats on the Akula II class INS Chakra that India had leased in 2012 for ten years.

    Future Nuclear Boats

    But it doesn’t stop here. A follow-on class of 6 SSBNs codenamed S5, almost twice as big as the Arihant-class, was also approved for development. These will be able to carry up to 12 K5 intercontinental ballistic missiles with MIRV warheads. And SSBNs aren’t the only nuclear submarines that the Indian Navy will field. Early this year, the government cleared a project to build six new hunter killer boats (SSN) for the Navy. A joint Navy, BARC and DRDO project, the boats will be designed by Navy’s Directorate of Naval Design and be powered by a new reactor being developed by BARC. SSNs are as important as SSBNs as they can blockade important sea routes, denying the enemy access to important resources in an event of war, and shadow enemy ships. This new SSN will be similar in size to the Arihant-class but will carry advanced torpedoes and be able to move much quicker. Also, India is likely to lease another Akula II for 10 years in 2018, most likely the Kashalot that is 60% complete and in need of funds.

    Conventional Submarines

    [​IMG]

    Things are looking up for India’s conventional submarine fleet too. Under the Project-75, six French-Spanish Scorpene submarines are being constructed at Mazagon Dock Ltd. The first of these, named INS Kalvari, has recently been ‘undocked’ and will undergo sea trials next year and is expected to be commissioned into the Navy by September 2016. Incidentally, Indian Navy’s first ever submarine, which was a Soviet Foxtrot-class sub, was also called the INS Kalvari. The name Kalvari means Tiger Shark, and in naval tradition, the line of subs will be called the Kalvari-class. Although late by nearly four years, the Kalvari-class will add a punch to the dwindling underwater arm of the Navy. The nearly 1600-tonne subs have a complement of 31 men and can stay out to sea for 50 days. Its two diesel generation sets give it a submerged top speed of 20 knots (37 km/h). Its weapons suite includes Black Shark heavy weight torpedoes that can sink a ship 50 kms away and Exocet anti-ship missile that travels a few feet from the surface of the sea and hits the hull of a target that’s 180 km away. It’s also one of the stealthiest diesel electric submarines in operation with emphasis on reducing hydrodynamic noise, which makes it invisible to enemy sonar. The last two boats of the class will also feature a DRDO designed Air Independent Propulsion (AIP) system which will give it longer endurance and make it stealthier because they won’t need to surface for air to charge the batteries.

    Alongside the Kalvari-class will be six of the next generation P75(I) diesel electric submarines, all of which will be built in India. Apart from the ability to fire long range heavy weight wire guided torpedoes and an AIP system, this new line of subs can also feature land attack capability. For this, the submarines will have to integrate a Vertical Launching System in the hull. The VLS will allows subs (and surface ships) to carry the world’s fastest cruise missile, the Brahmos, with a range of 290 km and the under development Nirbhaya cruise missile which has a range of 1,000 km. The Brahmos has already demonstrated the underwater launch capability and Nirbhaya too is being designed for launch from multiple platforms. But it remains to be seen if this capability can be integrated into the boats that are likely in contention. DCNS is expected to offer the Scorpene, while Russia is pitching the Amur 1650 which is the export version of the Lada class, which itself is an advance variant of the Kilo-class already in service with the Indian Navy. Other contenders include the S-80 by Navantia of Spain and the German HDW Type 214. India has also asked Japan to participate in the competition with its Soryu-class subs.

    [​IMG]

    So India is likely to field nearly 28 submarines including Arihant class subs, Follow-on SSBNs, New SSNs, 6 Kalvari class SSKs and 6 more P 75(I) boats, making it the most formidable submarine force in the Indian Ocean region.


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  2. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    it will take atleast 15 -25 years
     
  3. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    By 2022, IN will have minimum of two ACBG, 4 Arihant class, 2 Akula class, 6 Kilo class, 6 scorpene class subs.
     
  4. arulcharles

    arulcharles Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    In your dreams
     
  5. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    what is the composition of ACBGs besides the carriers ?
    how many AAW ships ASW ships destroyers, Subs ?

    after accounting for the ACBGs ships how many ships will be available at independent battle groups ?

    2By 2022

    2 akula ok - ned to lease one more
    6 kilo class ok - reduced to 6 from 9 current
    6 scorpene - maybe if no furthur delays
    4 arihant - lets see -

    even that makes it only 16-18 max best possible scenario
     
  6. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    One ACBG normally will have, one carrier, one fleet tanker, one nuke attack sub, 2-3 destroyers and 3-4 frigates/corvettes.
     
  7. lookieloo

    lookieloo 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Uh... define "soon."
     
  8. VinodKumar

    VinodKumar 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Well topic is hypothetical in itself ? Indian Navy is getting very strong but submarine's fleet of IN in troubled waters . subarimne manufacturing is complex and time consuming . that number can be reached only if India buy few old off the shelf and modernise them .or buy brand new.the submarine fleet will go from critical to stable ,for being powerful IN needs at least 40+ sub's :)
     
  9. jonas

    jonas Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    So if in your opinion IN needs at least 40+ subs, then given the current state of procurement you have re-defined the meaning of 'soon'. It is also not a case of how many submarines a nation has, but the expertise and it's competency in how to use them, and believe me that takes a lot of years to accrue.
    During the cold war it was said that whilst the Soviet Union was very wary of Nato submarines, the only ones they actually feared were the Royal Navy's. This was due to the years of experience,training and skills of the officers and men of the RN submarine service. We may have had, and in fact still do have a fraction of the numbers of larger powers, but we can still hold our own against anyone who has hostile intentions against us in this respect.
     
  10. VinodKumar

    VinodKumar 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    i agree to that point. but with few submarines you cant project sub merged naval power in IOR . yes quality is must still the quantity should be supported with quality . a single high end submarine can't be compared with 10 diesel submarine
     
  11. kaku

    kaku BANNED BANNED

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    Yup US Navy and Soviet Navy were playing mario during cold war era, while RN submarine fleet become formidable. :rofl:
     
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  12. TickTickIndian

    TickTickIndian BANNED BANNED

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    If the British are good at anything it is these three: Lying, being a pirate and shameless pomp.
     
  13. jonas

    jonas Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    So that is your idea of an educated reply is it, I really do feel sorry for socially maladjusted people like yourself, going through life carrying so much baggage around. In your case it is obviously due to an inferiority complex. I can only sympathize with you, but perhaps you need to get some counselling from a trained mental health professional. They seem to be the only ones that can help you fight this illness.
    Best of luck.
     
  14. TickTickIndian

    TickTickIndian BANNED BANNED

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    You don't deserve anything better. Hear it from one of our former PM itself:

    During a state visit to Cairo, Mr Gujral said during a private interaction with Egyptian intellectuals: "Britain is a third-rate power nursing delusions of grandeur of its colonial past. It created Kashmir when it divided India. And now it wants to give us a solution."

    I think it is better if you don't go around with too much self-praise because we already know you better.
     
  15. ricky123

    ricky123 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    acutally i agree Brits have good skills . WW2 was won mostly cuz of the British .
    we need to stop bickering on the past cuz no of us can change it .
     
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