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Indian nightmare: GMO killer-cotton (RT Documentary)

Discussion in 'General Multimedia' started by sangos, May 26, 2015.

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  1. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  2. TickTickIndian

    TickTickIndian BANNED BANNED

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    We used to have an 'expert' here who used to smear all my posts showing Monsanto seeds killing farmers.
     
  3. INDIAN NATIONALIST

    INDIAN NATIONALIST Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    This video highlights a fundamental issue that has to eventually be addressed, which is that even if the best consumer protections are in place, and the optimal environment exists of businesses competing to develop and sell their strain of seed to farmers at competitive price, we still have a national problem. The fact that all farmers are business owners means Indian farmers have to become internationally competitive businessmen. This is basically non-negotiable if Indians want an internationally competitive economy, yet it's something we don't much hear about, maybe we're squeamish to tackle, for whatever reason.

    This is the case in every nation, including the US and in Europe and East Asia. Our urban poor do not receive nearly the same attention or patronage from the government, even if their land assets are a fraction of their farming counterparts if that, they work just the same.

    GoI already purchases staple crop at artificially high prices and provides farming subsidies well above what the WTO allows, and this has been a point of contention in the past as well. I think that's fine if it's in our ultimate national interest, but we have to accelerate urbanization and movement of farmers especially subsistence farmers into other industries be it manufacturing or services, if our farmers are unable to figure out how to be successful in agricultural business.

    Farming is a business, which means farmers have to be good businessmen to survive, able to adapt, research, and use or invest their assets according to changing demand and in competition with others in the industry. This is true for all businessmen, from the CEO of Tata to the man selling vegetables, magazines, or tea on the street, or the cleaning lady that sells her services. This is true in virtually every industry world-wide, but for whatever reason, we tend to view farming and farmers in a unique light in India, without any discernible justification other than the activity just seems different than, say, owning and operating a mill or peddling spinach on the street.

    At some point, if one doesn't have the resources, skills, or otherwise ability make one's business profitable, then one needs to pursue other opportunities for one's livelihood. That's integral to gearing supply to meet consumer demand in a market economy. Being a farmer isn't a guarantee of success and prosperity any more than a businessman of any other sort, yet few other businesses in India enjoy the same patronage in terms of subsidies. Owning land doesn't entitle a guarantee of crop productivity.

    Many farmers will plant a single crop all year round because the government will always buy it from them; they won't fallow and they won't rotate with different strain of seed. They do this to increase productivity in the short-term, but they end up rendering their own soil infertile in the process.

    Nobody exists who denies the necessity for research, feasible regulation, fair competition by Indian producers, and safeguard against monopoly, by those that develop and sell strain of seed to India. But our farmers are poor and don't have knowledge or skills necessary to successfully manage their assets, take advantage of other opportunities, or in many cases the alternative opportunities to support the livelihoods of their families simply don't exist, and we need to focus our efforts here.

    PRC had a systematic policy of urbanization and shifting the population into manufacturing jobs, so opportunities were easier to come by. That, and their farmers are willing to eat literally anything to survive. When money or food is unavailable, they dredge up worms from the lake.

    They were willing to be pragmatic, and the opportunities existed to funnel them into industries with greater potential for long-term economic growth. We don't want our people relegated to eating worms but we want the best economic opportunities, so we have to focus on systematizing urbanization and providing opportunities outside of agriculture for farmers that for whatever reason cannot sucessfully run their business.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2015
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