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India's Mars mission

Discussion in 'Education & Research' started by layman, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. Anees

    Anees Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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  2. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    WOOWEEEEE:bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn::bounce-grn:
     
  3. Marqueur

    Marqueur Peaceful Silence ELITE MEMBER

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  4. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    Looks like Mangalyaan wants to give NaMo a run for his money ;). Btw MCC is a stereo cam?
     
  5. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    This Is Your MOM’s Mars


    [​IMG]
    Wow, MOM, wow. Click to edgarriceburroughsenate.
    Photo by ISOR

    Holy. Ares!

    THAT is a full-disk image of Mars taken by India’s Mars Orbiter Mission, or MOM. It was just released this morning and shows nearly an entire hemisphere of the planet.

    It’s gorgeous. There’s so much to see! North is to the upper left (roughly the 11:00 position), and the pole looks like it’s covered in a cloudy haze [Update (Sep. 29, 2014 at 17:40 UTC): Ah, according to my friend and fellow science writer Carolyn Collins Petersen, that's a dust storm brewing there.]. The huge, lighter-colored region just to the right and above center is called Arabia Terra, a 4,500-kilometer stretch of uplands that is one of the oldest terrains on Mars. It’s hard to tell from this wide-angle shot, but it’s heavily eroded and covered with craters.

    Just below it is a long dark feature called Terra Meridiani (“Meridian Land”; though you could fancifully call it “Middle Earth”). The rover Opportunity is there, still roaming around and poking at the rocks there. This whole area shows evidence that is was once under water.


    [​IMG] Phil Plait

    Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death From the Skies!

    Nestled in the northern part of Terra Meridiani is the crater Schiaparelli, which is more than 460 km across! That’s huge, far larger than the crater left by the dinosaur-killer impact here on Earth. Straight up from it in Arabia Terra you can also see the crater Cassini (also more than 400 km wide), and to the right, just inside the dark region called Syrtis Major, is the crater Huygens, which is about the same size as Schiaparelli. The astronomers Cassini and Huygens studied Saturn, which is why the Cassini probe is named what it is, and the lander probe it sent to the moon Titan is named Huygens. Those astronomers really get around.

    I could go on and on; you can see Hellas Basin as a smooth, butterscotch-colored area to the lower right just on the edge, and the ices of the south pole at the bottom. There are craters galore, and all sorts of wind-eroded areas that so many scientists will happily spend the rest of their lives studying.

    But for me, right now, what makes me sigh in awe is the overall perspective of this picture. We’re seeing the entire face of the planet here, a perspective we don’t always get from our probes, sent to study Mars in detail. And the added touch of it not being fully lit—you can see the day-night line, called the terminator, cutting across the planet to the upper left—really drives home that what we’re seeing here really is an entire world, a huge expanse of territory just calling out for us to explore and understand.

    There’s a lot of solar system out there to look at, and it fills me with joy to know we’re doing just that.

    MOM goes to Mars: Full-disk view of the red planet.
     
  6. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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  7. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    What the Mission to Mars Shows About India’s Innovators

    f the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) in placing the Mangalyaan satellite into orbit around Mars last week has three important lessons for companies about winning in emerging markets: big ambitions are critical, constraints can be liberating, and India can be an R&D powerhouse.

    There have only been three other successful orbiter missions to Martian orbit: probes from the United States, Russia, and the European Space Agency. Even more impressive than India succeeding in its first attempt is the fact that Mangalyaan is the cheapest interplanetary mission ever undertaken. It cost $74 million; NASA’s Maven Mars mission cost 10 times as much. Reflecting on the achievement, the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi remarked: “India had travelled through space to Mars at a cost of 7 cents per kilometer, much cheaper than travelling a kilometer in Ahmedabad,” Gujarat’s biggest city from which Narendra Modi hails.

    ISRO’s success is best characterized as frugal engineering. ISRO used indigenous components and technologies that are far cheaper than foreign imports. Indian engineers cost less, for sure. But the huge cost differential between Mangalyaan and Maven can’t be explained solely by labor cost differences between India and the U.S. The magic is in breakthrough design. Remarked Prof. Andrew Coates, who will be a principal investigator on Europe’s Mars rover: “ISRO has kept Mangalyaan small. The payload weighs only about 15 kg. Compare that with the complexity in the payload in Maven and that will explain a lot about the cost. Even though Mangalyaan has a small payload, it will actually address some of the biggest questions at the Red Planet.” Mangalyaan will circle Mars for six months and it is equipped with instruments to measure the presence of methane gas, which could indicate that there is life on the planet.

    Companies based in developed economies can learn much from the Mars mission about competing and operating in emerging markets:

    Create an audacious, inspiring goal. Emerging economies have the bulk of the world’s population, yet most of them are non-consumers of products and services that we take for granted in the West. Converting these non-consumers into consumers will require breakthrough innovations — quality products at affordable prices. The starting point for such innovations is a big idea, a big dream. The most well-known example of such highly ambitious goals is probably John F. Kennedy’s put-a-man-on-the-moon charge, but there are organizational examples as well that also unleashed game-changing innovations. Consider three:

    Bill Gates: Put a PC on every desk and in every home

    Dr. Muhummad Yunus: Put poverty in a museum

    Google: Organize the world’s information

    Constraints need not be limiting. Emerging economies are markets with huge number of constraints: low affordability, unreliable electricity, poor roads, pollution, lack of educational infrastructure, and so on. But I agree wholeheartedly with Terri Bresenham, CEO of GE Healthcare India, who said: “If necessity is the mother of innovation, constraint is the mother of frugal innovation.” Consider how Narayana Health turned constraints into a mega innovation opportunity. India has huge number of people with heart disease who can’t afford to pay much. India has very few cardiologists and very few cardiac hospitals. Instead of being discouraged by these constraints, Dr. Devi Shetty, the founder of Narayana Health, has designed a breakthrough health-care-delivery model within these constraints. The result: Narayana Health is able to perform open heart surgery at a cost of $3,000 — vs. $150,000 in the U.S. — at quality levels that match those in the best cardiac hospitals in the West.

    India is not about low cost; it is about superior capabilities. Most often, Western multinationals look at India as a source of low-cost labor. This is a serious mistake. Indian scientists and engineers are world class who also happen to be available at lower costs. Mangalyaan is not an isolated example. In 2002, the Mahindra Group’s automotive division innovated a breakthrough SUV called the Scorpio by practicing frugal engineering. The high-quality, low-cost Scorpio, India’s first indigenously designed SUV, was offered at 30% to 40% of the prices that competitors were charging. In January 2003, it was named the Car of the Year ahead of entries from Mercedes, Toyota, and Ford. It continues to outsell competing vehicles made by Ford, Renault, and others.

    To leverage India’s design and engineering capabilities, GE has built the largest corporate R&D Center in Bangalore India. Other multinationals should follow its example. They should view India and other emerging economies not as just markets to exploit but also as sources of breakthrough innovations.


    What the Mission to Mars Shows About India’s Innovators - Vijay Govindarajan - Harvard Business Review
     
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  8. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    India Mars Mission: New York Times apologises for cartoon
    [​IMG] The newspaper said a large number of readers had complained about the cartoon
    Continue reading the main story
    Related Stories
    The New York Times newspaper has apologised for a cartoon on India's Mars Mission following readers' complaints that it mocked India.

    The cartoon showed a farmer with a cow knocking at the door of a room marked Elite Space Club where two men sit reading a newspaper on India's feat.

    The cartoon was carried with an article titled India’s Budget Mission to Mars.

    Last month, India successfully put the Mangalyaan robotic probe into orbit around Mars.

    The total cost of the Indian mission was put at 4.5bn rupees ($74m; £45m), which makes it one of the cheapest interplanetary space missions ever.

    Only the US, Russia and Europe have previously sent missions to Mars, and India succeeded in its first attempt - an achievement that eluded even the Americans and the Soviets.

    Andrew Rosenthal, editorial page editor of the New York Times, wrote in a Facebook post that a "large number of readers" had complained about the cartoon.

    "The intent of the cartoonist, Heng Kim Song, was to highlight how space exploration is no longer the exclusive domain of rich, Western countries," Mr Rosenthal said.

    "Mr Heng, who is based in Singapore, uses images and text - often in a provocative way - to make observations about international affairs. We apologise to readers who were offended by the choice of images in this cartoon."

    Mr Rosenthal said Mr Heng "was in no way trying to impugn India, its government or its citizens".

    The Mangalyaan robotic probe was launched from the Sriharikota spaceport on the coast of the Bay of Bengal on 5 November 2013.

    The satellite joins four other missions that are circling the planet: Maven (US), Mars Odyssey (US), Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (US) and Mars Express (Europe).

    BBC News - India Mars Mission: New York Times apologises for cartoon
     
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  9. INDIAN NATIONALIST

    INDIAN NATIONALIST Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    The cartoon is insulting but still illustrates an important matter for Indians to address, which is that orientalist attitudes against Indians are still alive and well abroad. India has to change its image with the rest of the world if it plans on becoming a superpower, competitive in exporting its works and culture abroad. This of course begins with changing India's image domestically; thru reforms in culture and infrastructure.

    But I think media has a large roll to play as well. India has a lot of creative talent, and should organize to harness that talent to produce a range of media which is attractive not only to modern Indians but to foreigners of all denominations, and especially leaves a positive and nuanced impression of Indian society among the youth.

    We should aim that foreigners and Indians alike should associate India with a rich ancient culture in harmony with modernization of society and infrastructure.
     
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  10. Marqueur

    Marqueur Peaceful Silence ELITE MEMBER

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  11. Marqueur

    Marqueur Peaceful Silence ELITE MEMBER

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  12. Gessler

    Gessler Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    This thread is only for Mars mission, sir ji!
     
  13. Gessler

    Gessler Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    New images showing the Elysium pyramids on Mars -

    [​IMG]

    Screen grabs from a presentation by Director - SAC, ISRO at IIT Gandhinagar university -
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Gessler

    Gessler Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Some more -

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    do these amrican white fukers show white mentally ill person with legal weapons killing other white americans on the US soil when they are showing news on some other countries success... im sick and tired of seeing zopadpatis in the western media channels when they are showing news related to indian mars mission
     

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