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India's tsunami aid phobia misplaced?

Discussion in 'General History' started by InfoWarrior, Nov 15, 2017.

  1. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    India's tsunami aid phobia misplaced?
    Chidanand Rajghatta | TNN | Jan 8, 2005, 07.42 PM IST

    WASHINGTON: When the United States was swamped by the great Missouri-Mississippi flood in 1993 - 50 killed, $ 15 billion damages -- Bangladesh offered Washington help in the form of tea and jute to make sand bags.

    No thanks, the US responded, the locals have their own way of building levees. Okay, in that case we'd like to contribute relief in cash for all the help you have given us in times of distress, Bangladesh insisted. Dhaka then sent a check for $ 50,000, which Washington graciously accepted.

    "There are times when it is not the sum of money but the mere gesture of helping and the act of accepting it that defines the human spirit," a US official told this correspondent, relating this anecdote in the context of India initially declining all foreign government aid following the tsunami disaster.

    Although many commentators have praised New Delhi for its message of self-reliance, others, including aid workers, western government officials and even some NRIs are questioning New Delhi's policy that has since been reversed.

    "Frankly, we feel it is a misplaced desire to demonstrate India's self-importance in the region," the US official who spoke on background told TNN. "If anything, it seems to show the government does not care enough for the people."

    In a chance meeting with this correspondent, New Jersey Congressman Frank Pallone, an ardent India-supporter who will be in India next week, also expressed bafflement at New Delhi's stand, recalling he had worked for a $ 30 million aid after the Gujarat earthquake, but it had been rejected by the then BJP government.

    Also irked by New Delhi's stand is a section of the NRI community whose families and friends in coastal east and south India are affected by the calamity. Their question: Why should the people of Tamil Nadu be pawns in India's geo-political gamesmanship, particularly since New Delhi's disaster relief mechanism is so questionable?

    Another frustrated constituency -- western NGOs, who say India's initial "no-need-for-foreign-aid" stand caused confusion (because the government did not make it clear it was only declining foreign government aid) and choked contributions.

    Although the Indian government had since reversed its stand and said it will accept foreign aid where needed, some damage has already been done amid spotty praise for New Delhi's stand.

    US Secretary of State Colin Powell and presidential envoy Jeb Bush - a potential White House aspirant in 2008 - pointedly skipped India after touring Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Thailand, the other seriously affected countries, this week. A state department official said Washington was not miffed, but it was acutely conscious of India's sensitivity on the aid issue.

    Of course, there is also the small matter of millions, possibly hundreds of millions, of dollars aid that went past India, supposedly suffused with pride and cash. When India initially declined foreign help, the aid kitty was only a few hundred million. It has since swelled to $ 4 billion, as the true scale and gravity of the tragedy became evident. How much of it is coming New Delhi's way is anyone's guess. Most likely, it will be too little, too late.

    Top tsunami aid donors

    *Australia $ 861 million
    *Germany $ 664 million
    *Japan $ 500 million
    *United States $ 350 million
    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Indias-tsunami-aid-phobia-misplaced/articleshow/984643.cms
     
  2. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The Economic angle:
    Why did India reject Foreign Aid (US) during Tsunami?
    US was also interested in ensuring that they get the lion's share of incredibly lucrative reconstuction contracts. They wanted a main
    base for the huge reconstruction contracts in Asia, designed to replace the failed oil theft and reconstruction in Iraq, and keep poor old Zion on its tottering New York legs for a few more weeks or months.
    If everything had gone to plan, then Indonesia, Sri Lanka and India would have been in pawns to the IMF and World Bank for thirty or more years - time enough to wait for the price of oil to come down again after the lethal fiasco in Iraq.
    http://creative.sulekha.com/why-did-india-reject-foreign-aid-us-during-tsunami_127992_blog

    "Thermonuclear bomb caused Tsunami" theory is baseless. But lucrative reconstruction contracts, but IMF World bank loans seems to have merit.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    India open to foreign aid for tsunami victims
    After shunning all offers of foreign aid for tsunami victims, India on Thursday made amends and said it would accept contributions from the multi-national financial agencies like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.

    Even direct contributions to the tsunami-affected areas will now be welcome.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announced the policy change at a meeting of the Group of Ministers on disaster management at his residence in New Delhi on Thursday morning.
    Sources pointed out that the earlier decision to reject foreign aid was reviewed to remove any false impression that India was flush with funds to handle relief operations within the country and in the neighbourhood.

    The earlier decision was based on the fact that the scale of the tsunami disaster in India was smaller compared with some other countries and that India had the wherewithal to handle the situation, the sources said.

    Dr Manmohan Singh also disclosed that he had received a letter from Bharatiya Janata Party president Lal Krishna Advani suggesting that three worst-hit districts of Tamil Nadu be handed over to the army for relief operations. (Religious insecurity angle)

    Sources said the meeting, however, rejected the suggestion on the PM's pointer that it was better that the army provides support to the local administration in dealing with the situation.

    The prime minister also snubbed Shipping Minister T R Baalu, who complained at the meeting that the Jayalalithaa government in Tamil Nadu was not cooperating in the relief operations.

    "They are in distress and we have to help them instead of finding faults," the PM was quoted telling Baalu(DMK), hinting that he did not like any shadow of the DMK-AIADMK feud in this hour of crisis.

    According to the sources, Singh also told the members not to be carried away by tsunami incident, which was a one-time experience as opposed to cyclones.

    Cyclones devastate 30 to 40 km inside the shoreline unlike tsunamis which affect only the coastal areas, he said.

    India's focus should be on cyclones, the PM stressed.

    He also dubbed as exaggerated media reports about non-functioning jetties of the Port Trust, which allegedly affected movement of boats carrying relief material.

    Though the prime minister opened the doors for relief from foreign aid agencies and not foreign governments, India would certainly review its stand further "if we feel we can benefit from the help being offered by friendly countries," Foreign Secretary Shyam Saran said.

    The press conference convened by Saran was mainly to defuse the angry posture of the United States administration.

    He stressed that India had never objected to the Americans rushing into the affected countries to provide help.

    "There is a disaster. There is requirement for assistance. If the US believed that it could contribute to this task, it was more than welcome," Saran said.

    Notwithstanding India earlier refusing financial help from other countries, the US had already contributed $10 lakh to the Prime Minister's Relief Fund through its ambassador David Mulford.

    However, the PMO has explained that the fund was accepted as an individual donation and not as a country-to-country aid.

    Meanwhile, the US has pledged an additional US $30 lakh through the NGOs working in India.

    Meanwhile, the GoM meeting felt the situation was now under control and hence decided that there was no need for daily sittings of the Group of Ministers and the Crisis Management Committee headed by the Cabinet Secretary.

    They will now meet "as and when needed," sources in the Prime Minister's Office said.
    http://www.rediff.com/news/2005/jan/06sheela.htm
     
  3. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    2005, Seriously ?
     
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  4. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Govt refuses foreign aid to fight disaster
    Indrani Bagchi | TNN | Dec 28, 2004, 10.36 PM IST

    NEW DELHI: India has declined offers of foreign aid, because the government feels it can manage the relief and rescue operations on its own. From Russia to Israel as well as international organisations, offers for help to battle the tsunami disaster have been pouring in.

    But according to government sources, India has declined all offers, albeit with the provision that should the need arise later, the decision would be reconsidered.

    India has an unwritten but holy policy of not asking for aid during emergencies even though established international aid agencies like ICRC and Red Crescent have operations here. In fact, during his recent visit to the UAE, external affairs minister Natwar Singh thanked the leadership for their help through the Red Crescent.

    The best way to aid the Indian effort is to contribute to the PM's relief fund which then takes on the task of disbursement. Natwar cut short his visit to the Gulf and spent the day speaking to his counterparts in other tsunami-hit countries.
    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com...-aid-to-fight-disaster/articleshow/973923.cms

    ======================================

    Why has India blocked foreign tsunami aid to the Nicobar and Andaman islands?
    By Parwini Zora and Daniel Woreck
    25 January 2005

    The remote Andaman and Nicobar group suffered a devastating blow from the December 26 tsunami. The low-lying and mostly uninhabited chain of 572 islands in the Bay of Bengal was the closest Indian territory to the epicentre of the massive earthquake. As well as being swamped by the sea, it was hit by a series of substantial aftershocks.

    The official death toll is now more than 1,800 but over 5,500 people are still missing, presumed dead. While the southern state of Tamil Nadu had the largest number of Indian deaths in absolute terms, the population of the Andaman and Nicobar islands is just 356,000 and is proportionately the hardest hit. An estimated 288,000 people, or 80 percent of the total population, have been affected.

    Nearly 12,000 survivors from the 38 inhabited islands were evacuated to the Andaman capital of Port Blair. By January 4, however, the exodus had to be halted as relief camps in the town had filled to overflowing. Most of Port Blair’s schools were overcrowded with refugees while others were forced to live under plastic sheeting.

    An estimated 40,000 people are taking shelter in relief camps scattered across the archipelago. The camps are under the supervision of local authorities who are installed directly by the central government in New Delhi and come under the supervision of the Indian military.

    The Indian government claims to have organised adequate emergency relief for the stricken islands. The survivors, however, complain of delays and a lack of medical care, and have criticised the manner in which the Indian military has conducted relief operations. The government has not only ignored the grievances, but refused all offers of assistance from foreign aid groups.

    The only international organisation allowed to operate across the archipelago is UNICEF. Foreign journalists and aid workers have been confined to Port Blair and not permitted to travel to any of the outlying islands. International aid groups have been permitted to provide assistance to local organisations, but even these activities have been restricted.

    Just over a week ago, International Red Cross officials accused authorities of hijacking aid being sent to survivors. The Red Cross alleged that supplies being shipped to Port Blair were being seized at the docks, apparently for distribution by government agencies.

    According to a BBC report, “The Andaman-Nicobar administration is determined to prevent foreign voluntary groups from joining the relief effort, even if it is by proxy.”

    The obvious question arises: why such sensitivity to a foreign aid presence in the Andamans? ( Dr Manmohan Singh also disclosed that he had received a letter from Bharatiya Janata Party president Lal Krishna Advani suggesting that three worst-hit districts of Tamil Nadu be handed over to the army for relief operations. )

    From the outset, New Delhi has insisted that India did not require international aid. Indian Foreign Secretary Shyam Suran told the press: “In terms of not accepting foreign assistance, we feel we have all the resources to cope... our response to this disaster was very prompt and effective.”

    In fact, the government went further. In line with its ambitions to become a major regional power, New Delhi rushed medical and technical aid to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and the Indonesian province of Aceh. In its largest ever peacetime operation—“Operation Sea Wave”—the Indian navy dispatched 32 ships to the stricken countries in the space of just one week.

    During a visit to Calcutta, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh commented: “Our response [to the tsunami] was not shaped by false pride or by chauvinism. We are happy to be part of the global community and to work with it.” He nevertheless boasted that “India could demonstrate to the world its ability and capability to stand on its own feet”.

    But as the inadequacy of relief efforts in southern India surfaced in the media, New Delhi was compelled to modify its stance. While still rejecting direct aid from foreign countries, the Singh government declared that it was willing to accept financial aid from the UN, the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Various aid groups and non-government organisations, foreign and India, were already providing some assistance.

    Sensitive military bases
    In the Nicobar and Andaman group, however, the tight restrictions remain in force. While the Indian government has pointed to the need to protect the aboriginal tribes, its overriding concern is to preserve the secrecy surrounding Indian military bases on the islands. As Suba Chandran, an analyst at the Delhi-based Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, told the BBC: “It is a Cold War mentality. India is sensitive about its military installations in the Andamans.”

    At its southernmost point, the archipelago is just 150km from Indonesia’s Sumatra. The northernmost point is less than 50km from the Coco Islands which belong to Burma. The islands are in an ideal position to monitor shipping through the Malacca Strait, which is a key route from the Middle East to North East Asia and the broader Asian Pacific region. A substantial proportion of world trade, including vital oil supplies to Japan and China, passes through the strait. US military strategists have long regarded the sea-lane as a crucial “choke point” that could be used to cut off vital supplies in the event of a conflict, with China in particular.

    The area is the focus for growing rivalry. In an effort to protect its supply routes, China has strengthened ties with Burma and is reportedly developing naval bases and electronic surveillance facilities in the country. India, which has been developing a close strategic alliance with the US, has used the Nicobar and Andaman islands to “counter” the Chinese presence in Burma and other Asian countries.

    In 2001, India spent an estimated $US2 billion to establish the Andaman Nicobar Command, jointly run by the army, navy, air force and the coast guard, to preside over its military operations in the archipelago. The Indian airforce has a substantial presence, including a fighter squadron and a unit of helicopters. The army was to station a full division or 8,000 soldiers in the islands. Surveillance and monitoring stations have been established along the entire archipelago.

    Since winning last year’s elections, Congress has continued the overall military expansion set in train by the previous Bharatya Janatha Party (BJP)-led coalition. In last year’s budget, defence spending was boosted by another 27 percent to a total of $US17.63 billion or 2.5 percent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The hardware to be purchased includes three French Scorpion submarines, 115 multi-purpose fighters, three Phalcon airborne warning radar systems and a Russian aircraft carrier.

    The Congress-led government did not hesitate in maintaining the close military relations with Washington established by its predecessors. Last July-August, the Indian Airforce took part in a US exercise in Alaska codenamed Exercise Cooperative Thunder. In October, the Indian navy engaged in manoeuvres with the US navy in the Arabian Sea near Goa.

    An article on the Asia Times website last November entitled “Navy reflects India’s strategic ambitions” pointed to the expansion of Indian naval operations. “Most striking of all, the Indian navy is in the midst of a deployment to the South China Sea and beyond that is bringing Indian warships to ports in Vietnam, the Philippines, Indonesia, South Korea and Japan. This is the first time that the Indian navy will have such an extensive agenda in the South China Sea.”

    The author—US strategic analyst Dr Donald Berlin—noted that India had held discussions with Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore about naval collaboration in the Malacca Strait. The Indian and Indonesian navies are already engaged in joint patrols in what is known as the Six Degree Channel separating Nicobar from the Indonesian island of Sabang. The channel is normally used by all international shipping entering or leaving the Malacca Strait.

    India’s strategically-located bases in the Andaman and Nicobar islands are crucial to its ambitions for a naval presence in the Malacca Strait and beyond. In preserving a cloak of secrecy over its military operations in the archipelago, the fate of tsunami victims is clearly the last consideration.
    https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2005/01/anda-j25.html

    ===================================
    @Hellfire
    Why do you think BJP asked PM Manmohan for Indian army supervision in relief work ?
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  5. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Foreign aid? No, thanks
    CHARU SUDAN KASTURI
    [​IMG]
    New Delhi, July 6: When US secretary of state John Kerry announced a $150,000 American aid for Uttarakhand flood victims two Sundays ago, he appeared almost embarrassed at how small the amount was.

    He needn’t have worried. It was $150,000 (Rs 90 lakh) more than India would accept.

    Finance minister P. Chidambaram said on Tuesday that India would approach multilateral agencies like the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank for loans to rebuild the disaster-hit state.

    However, New Delhi has turned down bilateral assistance from foreign countries for the Uttarakhand calamity, building on a quiet but assertive diplomatic aid policy that has coincided with its growing economic clout.

    It’s a policy that has seen India change from a country that happily accepted foreign aid to tide it over natural disasters just a decade ago to a nation that routinely rejects bilateral assistance to handle such crises.

    Instead of taking aid, New Delhi has emerged a regular donor whenever natural disasters strike anywhere in the world, from impoverished Haiti to developed Japan.

    India has made it clear to both the US and Japan, which offered $200,000 towards Uttarakhand relief, that it will not accept the aid and that any funding must be given to NGOs of the foreign governments’ choice.

    “As a general policy in case of rescue and relief operations, we have followed the practice that we have adequate ability to respond to emergency requirements,” external affairs ministry spokesperson Syed Akbaruddin said on Wednesday.

    The policy is entrenched in India’s increasing attempts to showcase its economic power to the world, and to shed memories of a past that saw it dependent on US rice during the 1960s to stave off starvation deaths.

    In 1991, India had to mortgage its gold reserves to get a loan from the International Monetary Fund. Today, India still remains one of the world’s largest overall aid recipients from agencies such as Britain’s Department for International Development, but in no sector are those funds critical. In disaster aid, those funds are nil.

    The man widely credited with turning the Indian economy around in 1991 — current Prime Minister Manmohan Singh — was also the man who marked the shift in the country’s disaster aid policy when he rejected bilateral assistance after the 2004 tsunami.

    “We feel that we can cope up with the situation on our own and we will take their help if needed,” Singh had said at the time after giant Indian Ocean waves killed over 12,000 and displaced more than 600,000 in India.

    Instead, India handed over cheques for $25 million to Sri Lanka, $1 million to Indonesia and $500,000 to Thailand for relief and rehabilitation. It also airdropped food, medicines and blankets over Sri Lanka’s devastated coasts.

    Just months earlier, India had accepted nominal bilateral aid after floods tore through Bihar’s plains. After the Bengal floods in 2002, the Gujarat earthquake in 2001, and the Latur temblor in 1993, India had gratefully accepted funds from foreign countries (see chart).

    But Singh’s post-tsunami statement evolved into a diplomatic policy that has since then seen India offer help both to neighbours and to countries almost halfway across the globe.

    After the 2005 Kashmir earthquake that led to deaths and damage both in India and Pakistan, New Delhi refused to accept aid but sent blankets, medicines and food to Pakistan-occupied Kashmir after convincing an initially suspicious Islamabad. It also handed over a $25 million cheque to Pakistan.

    Myanmar and China have also been beneficiaries of the policy. India donated $5 million towards Haiti’s reconstruction after a powerful earthquake hit the tiny Caribbean country in 2010.

    The policy is also about driving home a point to countries that have traditionally led the world’s economic system.

    The US — politely told by India to hunt for NGOs to disburse their meagre donations to — received Indian aid after Hurricane Katrina struck its southern states. And as Japan grappled with the Fukushima earthquake and subsequent nuclear incident, India sent blankets and medicines to help victims.
    https://www.telegraphindia.com/1130707/jsp/nation/story_17090124.jsp
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  6. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Pride and Politics: India Rejects Quake Aid
    By SOMINI SENGUPTAOCT. 19, 2005


    Correction Appended

    NEW DELHI, Oct. 18 - Calamities of nature do not just test the capacity of a state. They can also offer unexpected opportunities for political craftsmanship.

    Take India. The government has announced that it needs no international aid to recover from the Oct. 8 earthquake that leveled villages in the Indian-controlled part of Kashmir, killed an estimated 1,300 people there and displaced roughly 30,000 families.

    As temperatures fall to near freezing in the hilltop hamlets of Kashmir, the most liberal estimates suggest that fewer than half of the surviving families have tents to sleep in. Yet a full nine days and nights after the quake, Indian officials say they have no need for the United Nations, nor foreign aid agencies, to bring tents from abroad.

    Indian officials say that they are able to care for their own, and that tents are coming from private producers and the Indian military. What is more, India has sent aid, including 620 tents, to its neighbor and archrival, Pakistan. "We ourselves are taking care of our victims," said Navtej Sarna, the Foreign Ministry spokesman. "When there are offers by friendly countries and anything is needed, these offers are considered."

    It is too early to tell whether India, which seeks a permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council, can go it alone. Certainly there is anger in Indian-administered Kashmir among people who have been forced to build their own tents out of the wooden beams and tin sheets retrieved from the rubble of their homes. Even so, India's posture says a great deal about the politics of disaster aid, and about India's own ambitions to assert itself as a world power.

    Continue reading the main story
    India also refused international aid in the immediate aftermath of the tsunami, though it later allowed United Nations and private agencies to help. Three years ago, it rebuffed development aid from a number of foreign donors, saying it was no longer necessary. In short, India has been anxious to portray itself as a giver, rather than a receiver. "What we can manage on our own, we do," said Hamid Ansari, a retired Indian diplomat. "There's a certain sense of self-confidence that we can manage it and, let me say, a desire to signal that you are capable of managing things on your own."

    Pratap Bhanu Mehta, the director of a private research group here called the Center for Policy Research, saw reflected in India's rejection of foreign aid so far a desire to be seen as an emerging global power, or one of what he called "the big boys."

    "The risk really is that in our refusal to accept aid I don't think we are keeping people to whom aid might go as central," Mr. Mehta said. "We are playing politics with aid, using aid to make a statement."

    Pakistan's approach has been exactly the opposite. Hit a whole lot harder by the Oct. 8 quake -- its official death toll stood at 42,000 on Tuesday-- Pakistan has appealed for worldwide help and allowed foreigners to travel to its side of Kashmir and to the traditionally well-guarded pockets of North-West Frontier Province, the two areas that suffered the greatest damage.

    Pakistan is the world's largest manufacturer of tents, but still cannot produce nearly enough. The United Nations said Tuesday that 350,000 additional tents were urgently needed and that 500,000 earthquake survivors had still not received any medical care, food or other assistance.


    There is no agreement on whether India has sufficient tents to care for its own. The Foreign Ministry spokesman said the Indian Army would be able to help make up the shortfall. The army spokesman in Kashmir, Lt. Col. S.K. Batra, cautioned that the military, itself badly hit in the earthquake, could not entirely deplete its own stock. The government's joint secretary of disaster management, Aseem Khurana, vowed that enough tents would be sent within a week. So far, roughly 13,000 of the 30,000 tents required have been distributed, he said, slightly less than half sent by the Indian Army.

    State government officials in Kashmir said they were puzzled about the dearth of tents. "It is really eye-opening for us, that in this country with such a large population base, more than a million-strong army, and so many paramilitary forces we just do not have enough tents," said Muzaffar Baig, the Kashmir state finance and planning minister. "Every day we are getting only 300 to 400 tents from the central government."

    R.K. Pachauri, director of the Energy Research Institute in Delhi, a private research group, insisted that if India had enough tents, they should have been distributed much more quickly. If it did not, it should have accepted them from overseas right away. "We should really have been able to organize ourselves a little better," he said. That the quake struck the province of Jammu and Kashmir, which has been at the center of a long territorial dispute between India and Pakistan, makes the politics of aid particularly prickly. The Indian government has never been keen on outside intervention in Kashmir, so the subject of foreign aid to the quake victims is a touchy matter.

    "New Delhi has adopted an enlightened approach to helping Pakistan during this tragedy, and a backward approach to accepting foreign humanitarian assistance on its side of the Kashmir divide," said Michael Krepon, president of the Washington-based Henry L. Stimson Center, which studies security issues. "Part of this has to do with national pride, which is compounded by sensitivity to foreign governments making landfall in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir."

    Kashmiri leaders have pressed New Delhi to embrace international aid as a humanitarian gesture. "Allow international organizations to come in and help the Kashmiri people," said Yasin Malik, leader of a separatist group called Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front. "India will gain. They will not lose with this kind of gesture."

    In the back and forth between India and Pakistan, neighborly solidarity is difficult to distinguish from political gamesmanship. On Monday, Pakistan accepted India's longstanding offer of helicopters to help with relief work, but said it would not take Indian military pilots or crews. On Tuesday afternoon, India announced that it would open a number of telephone lines to enable Kashmiris in its territory to communicate with their relatives on the Pakistani side.

    By Tuesday evening, the Pakistani president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, called on India to allow Kashmiris to cross the disputed Line of Control to assist in relief efforts. Later in the evening, India said it welcomed General Musharraf's suggestion. "This is in line with India's advocacy of greater movement across the line for relief work and closer people-to-people contacts," a Foreign Ministry statement said. "India is willing to facilitate such movements, but we await word from Pakistan about the practical details of implementing this intention."

    LETTER FROM ASIA Correction: October 22, 2005, Saturday A Letter From Asia article on Wednesday about political implications of India's decision against seeking foreign help for its earthquake victims misstated the title of Michael Krepon, who discussed the issue. He is president emeritus of the Henry L. Stimson Center; the current president is Ellen Laipson.

    Hari Kumar contributed reporting for this article.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/19/world/asia/pride-and-politics-india-rejects-quake-aid.html
     
  7. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    @Hellfire
    I think there was a tug of war between two groups in 2004 Tsunami, BJP forced relief work through Indian army and government agencies. All this while people were suffering, there was petty politics behind India rejecting Tsunami aid. While we Naive Indians rejected aid for national pride, we were being manipulated for national security, elements of religious conversions, economics of reconstruction contracts etc
    Vajpayee, Advani to meet PM on tsunami
    New Delhi, Dec 31 (PTI) Former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and BJP President L K Advani will meet Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to discuss the relief and rehabilitation measures being taken in the Tsunami-affected areas.
    Advani, who toured the affected areas in southern India, had on Wednesday demanded that the Prime Minister convene an all-party meeting to discuss the issue.
    The Opposition party has also set up a calamity relief fund and requested the government to provide three boggies to carry the relief supply collected by the party to the affected areas.
    https://www.outlookindia.com/newswire/story/vajpayee-advani-to-meet-pm-on-tsunami/270455



    Rescue efforts in full swing in Kanyakumari district
    Even as the entire district was shocked by the devastation, the mourners today geared up for rescuing the victims. People from nearby areas, especially from Monday Market and Reetapuram, and volunteers of Christian missions, the Rastriya Swayam Sevak and the Tamil Nadu Muslim Munnetra Kazhagam, swung into action to speed up the operations.

    All most all shops remained closed in the vicinity, including Colachel, Thengampudur and Parakkai, as a mark of respect to the dead. A few associations came out with posters to condole the deaths.

    The villagers alleged that the police did not visit the affected areas to assist in rescue. Besides, the bus services at Colachel — the only mode of transport to rush victims to hospital — were abruptly withdrawn.
    http://www.thehindu.com/2004/12/28/stories/2004122813510300.htm

    ----------------------

    Rampant evangelism used the human agony of tsunami, yet there was not a single op-ed in national newspapers, not a low decibel murmur in the high voltage chat-shows of the media networks.
    https://swarajyamag.com/politics/why-no-outrage-over-conversion-of-tsunami-victims

    Many flock back to God on the Andaman Islands
    http://www.asianews.it/news-en/(Sou...-back-to-God-on-the-Andaman-Islands-2701.html


    International Religious Freedom Report 2006
    Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    A number of federal and state laws regulate religious life in the country. These include the Foreign Contribution Regulation Act (FCRA) of 1976, several state anti-conversion laws, the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act of 1967, the Religious Institutions (Prevention of Misuse) Act of 1988, India's Foreigners Act of 1946, and the Indian Divorce Act of 1869.

    The Government may ban religious organizations that provoke intercommunity friction, have been involved in terrorism or sedition, or have violated the FCRA, which restricts the disbursement of foreign funds to missionaries and religious organizations, both foreign and local. Some organizations complained that the FCRA prevented them from properly financing humanitarian and educational activities.
     
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  8. Hellfire

    Hellfire Devil's Advocate Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Shall reply in detail on this. Tomorrow.
     
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  9. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

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    One word, Foreign aid is how foreign nations infiltrate into other countries, we all know that aid doesn't go to people on ground but to NGO's who will be played by a puppeteer from shadows.
    There are a lot stories,incidents known personally by me. of how Evangelist's denied relief material to Tsunami affected villagers,asking them to convert in order to get relief material. Why do you wonder these Evangelist vultures start flocking around a disaster site? to exploit the situation for soul harvesting.This is just one reason among many myriad others for not letting foreign aid in or foreign NGO's in disaster struck areas in India.
     
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  10. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    I know, that's why I think some western countries like USA and Britain cannot be trusted. I searched and found those stories,

    Missionaries withhold aid when tsunami victims refuse to convert.
    https://stupidevilbastard.com/2005/...d_aid_when_tsunami_victims_refuse_to_convert/

    Religious aid groups try to convert victims
    Muslim clerics object as Western Christian groups hand out food and Bibles, reports Jason Burke in Banda Aceh
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2005/jan/16/tsunami2004.internationalaidanddevelopment1
    Christian missionaries and tsunami relief. what could go wrong?
    http://cityofbrass.blogspot.in/2005/01/christian-missionaries-and-tsunami.html

    Christians Defy Law to Convert Muslims in Tsunami Aftermath
    https://internationalreportingproje...y-law-to-convert-muslims-in-tsunami-aftermath
    And USA pressurized India to accept the aid, I was thinking if some of these News reports were part of US strategy.

    WikiLeaks has revealed US spying on BJP. I just hope people's suffering was not in vain, that fear was realistic not a phobia.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2017
  11. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

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    I was in Med School, that time ,worked as a volunteer during Tsunami relief in AP,TN, i saw the Evangelists denying disaster relief materials to those who didn't convert , i reported it to other volunteers. The villagers got agitated over Evangelists asking them to convert on spot by pledging to Bible to get food packets,finally,when volunteers came forward to question the Evangelists over denial of food packets to villagers, they packed up all their materials in a truck and left away without giving it to villagers. The places where there was no opposition or people to question their motives, the evangelists got away with on spot religious conversions.

    Even during Nepal Earthquake,Doctors from Delhi formed a team went to Nepal,There too Evangelists were busy trying to soul harvest Nepalis, To add to it, Pakistan was busy trying to get it's influence by whipping up Anti-India sentiments in Nepal as reported by our media that time.Infact, Pakistan sending Beef Masala packets to Nepal were noticed by my friend and brought to attention of aaj tak News channel.:D:p
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2017
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  12. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The Beef masala controversy backfired, currently the Nepalis hate our guts. Only the Indian like chethri/ bahun/newar communities have some sympathy for us, rest of Paharis totally hate India.

    Nepal Earthquake (April 2015): Why did Nepal trend #GoHomeIndianMedia?
    https://www.quora.com/Nepal-Earthquake-April-2015-Why-did-Nepal-trend-GoHomeIndianMedia

    How do Nepalese people view Pakistan sending 'beef masala' for the Nepal Earthquake victims?
    https://www.quora.com/How-do-Nepale...-beef-masala-for-the-Nepal-Earthquake-victims


     
  13. Hellfire

    Hellfire Devil's Advocate Staff Member MODERATOR

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    @InfoWarrior

    Please understand that the Indian Armed Forces remain the only viable and cohesive working organization left in this country which works without any organizational interest or import to personal interest in times of crisis.

    Building on that I am sorry to say that I shall merely write right now that the civil administration and the NDRF have been found not only woefully inadequate, but at times unprepared to deal with situations.
    I am sorry, I will expand on this in some more detail subsequently as soon as I am able to spend some time on the forum.
     
  14. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Beef Masala was reported ,because that what was what Pakistan sent to Nepal as relief aid material. That is akin to sending Pork Masala to Saudi Arabia or a Islamic country as Aid material in natural disasters. Doesn't matter if Nepalis agree with Pakistan or not, it was reported by our media not Nepali media, then what is the fuss about?

    Madhesis were always Pro-India, if Indian govenment intervened and helped Monarchy repel the Maoists, then Whole of Nepal would be Pro-India,Instead India sat back let Maoists take control of Nepal and they fed anti-India propaganda courtesy of China, Thanks to our Stupid idea of Nehru called Non-Alignment, while China was raising cadres and feeding Maoism in Nepal and India, India did nothing.Atleast now the Modi Govt. is proactive.
    Nepalese enjoy same rights same as a citizen of India does,except only one rule, they cannot vote nor stand for elections in India, Which country in world has such relaxed laws and open borders for a neighboring country?
     
  15. Rajaraja Chola

    Rajaraja Chola 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    The thing is after a point of time these countries start of brag how much they have helped us and how dare India have taken such a stance etc. Britishers commenting on their news papers coloums is a proof of their arrogance. They actually think they are giving aid to the tune of 100's of millions every year.
    Second they route their aid through NGO's who are later found to be involved in other matters. Missionary activities like we saw in Nepal. And reconstruction activities have to be done only by US companies and it will be such a joke. If an Indian company can do one consultancy and building in 2m$, the same US companies will do it for 10m. Its a total waste of money.

    However foreign money should be allowed to deposit in PM Disaster Management funds or to be routed by Indian govt approved NGO's or CM Disaster Management Funds.
     
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