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Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC) News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by CONNAN, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. The Drdo Guy

    The Drdo Guy Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    First of all sorry for spelling mistakes and plz keep correcting me.They are because of the reason that i'm learning french these days and my mind is sort of bloked.Now coming to the topic::::US is offering India to coproduce the EMALS(which they are using on there new AC) and by the time the work on IAC 2 will begins i think we will have EMALS technology.Indian navy is also preffering EMALS for IAC 2.Vice admiral of indian navy VK Dhowan said that indian navy is considering for the nuclear powered IAC2. And after the successful launch of INS Arihant i'm pretty sure that IAC 2 will be nuclear powered.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
  2. jonas

    jonas Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    I would agree with you that EMALS is a likely contender for IAC2 now that the US has offered the technology. As for it being nuclear powered that is possibly more problematic, I wonder how far the design team have progressed with it,if they have been designing it for conventional power then it is back to the drawing board if nuclear is being considered.

    It is not just a case of putting in a reactor,a whole re design will be needed. Then their is the actual reactor itself, you will presumably have to design a new reactor for a carrier,though that is obviously within your capabilities it will once again take time.

    That though will not be a bad thing IMO, it will give time for a mature design and risk reduction,so that when the build starts it will be as efficient as it can be.

    As far as spelling mistakes,forget it,when I can speak Hindi or any other language then I would feel able to criticise others,you do better than I do.
     
  3. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    INS Vikrant truly a pan Indian effort

    [​IMG]

    The recent rebirth of Vikrant, India’s first aircraft carrier, de-commissioned on January 31, 1997, marks a special feather in indigenous defence capabilities- this being the first ever aircraft carrier to be designed by the Directorate of Naval Design of the Indian Navy, the first warship to be built by Cochin Shipyard Limited and the first warship to be built entirely using indigenously produced steel.

    The construction of the ship is a truly pan Indian effort with active participation of private and public enterprises. The steel has come from SAIL’s plants in Raurkela in Orissa, Bokaro in Jharkand and Bhilai in Chattisgarh; the Main Switch Board, steering gear and water tight hatches have been manufactured by Larsen and Toubro in its plants in Mumbai and Talegaon; the high capacity air conditioning and refrigeration systems have been manufactured in Kirloskar’s plants in Pune; most pumps have been supplied by Best and Crompton, Chennai; Bharat Heavy Engineering Limited (BHEL) is supplying the Integrated Platform Management System (IPMS); the massive gear box is supplied by Elecon in Gujarat; the tens of thousands of electrical cable is supplied by Nicco industries in Kokatta;

    Kolkatta is also where the ship’s anchor chain cable is manufactured. Vikrant will be capable of operating an aircraft mix of the Russian MiG-29K and LCA (Navy) fighters being developed

    Indigenously by HAL. Its helicopter component will include the Kamov 31 and the indigenously developed ALH helicopters. The ship’s ability to sense and control a large air space around it will be enabled by modern C/D band Early Air Warning Radar, V/UHF Tactical Air Navigational and Direction Finding systems, jamming capabilities over the expected Electro Magnetic (EM) environment and Carrier Control Approach Radars to aid air operations. Long Range Surface to Air Missile (LR SAM) systems with Multi-Function Radar (MFR) and Close- In Weapon System (CIWS) will form the protective suite of the ship.

    All weapon systems onboard the carrier will be integrated through an indigenous Combat Management System (CMS), being manufactured by Tata Power systems. The ship’s integration with Navy’s Network Centric Operations will provide force multiplication. Design of this prestigious ship has been undertaken by the Directorate of Naval Design (DND) of the Indian Navy. Created in 1956 as the Corps of Naval Constructors, to realise the dream of being a builder’s Navy through indigenisation, DND has successfully designed over 17 different classes of warships, to which around 90 ships have already been built within the country.

    The Delhi class destroyers, with a displacement of about 7000 tonnes, were the biggest warships designed by DND so far. Designing of the Vikrant, at almost 40,000 tonnes speaks of the maturing of the capabilities of DND and represents a feather in the cap of the designers particularly as it is the first aircraft carrier of its size in the world with some unique features such as Gas Turbine Propulsion. The seamless hull and smooth lines of the ship stand as testimony to the high production standards of Cochin

    Shipyard Limited (CSL). CSL, a mini Ratna PSU, has earned a reputation for quality construction and timely delivery. Till now, CSL had the distinction of building the largest ship in India i.e., 93,500 tonne Aframax tankers. However, this complex integrated construction project enabled by a Rs 200 crore infrastructure augmentation plan involving large cranes, workshops and heavy duty machinery has seen the shipyard maturing into a competent warship builder. Vikrant will now enter the second phase of construction which will see the outfitting of the ship, fitment of various weapons and sensors, integration of the gigantic propulsion system and integration of the aircraft complex (with the assistance of M/s NDB of Russia).

    The ship will then undergo extensive trials before she is handed over to the Indian Navy by around 2016-17.At the recent launch, marking the end of Phase- I of the project, the imposing ramp of the 37,500 tonne Short Take off but Assisted Recovery (STOBAR) Carrier boasted the indigenous design and build capabilities of the country. The ship has attained its designed length of about 260 m and is almost at its maximum breadth of 60 m. The main landing strip is ready.

    Over 80% of the structure, containing about 2300 compartments has been fabricated, over 75% has been erected, all the major machinery, such as the two LM2500 Gas Turbines developing a total power of 80 MW, the diesel alternators capable of producing about 24 MW and the main gear box have been fitted.

    Soon after Vikrant floated perfectly upright, she was launched out into the Ernakulam Channel in a pontoon assisted precision manoeuvre. Vikrant was moved out of the building dock to be positioned in the refitting dock where the next Phase of outfitting will be completed

    INS Vikrant truly a pan Indian effort | idrw.org
     
  4. S K Mittal

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    I'm pretty much sure that if IAC-3 will be built then it will be nuclear one.
     
  5. Gessler

    Gessler Mod MODERATOR

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  6. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Second phase work on INS Vikrant to get under way in Cochin shipyard

    Two months after it was floated out at a ceremony at Cochin Shipyard India’s first indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant has now been taken to the bigger, repair dock of the yard for the second phase of construction.Launched at 17,500 tonnes with the ski-jump in place, the carrier will displace 40,000 tonnes once it is fully built and fitted out. Structural work on the fleet’s air defence platform — including entire hull work, angle deck and island structure, all using about 4,000 tonnes of steel — is slated to be over by May next, when it will be undocked for integration of the crucial aviation complex, complete with hangars, hydraulics, command-control and the like.

    Basin trials of the carrier will happen in the last phase, set to commence in 2017.

    While the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) sanctioned Rs. 3,261 crore for the first phase of carrier construction, it is reliably learnt that the CCS is contemplating sanction of nearly Rs. 2,600 crore by way of cost to Cochin Shipyard for the crucial second phase.

    The work-share arrangement for Vikrant construction under the Navy’s Project 71 is such that the Navy sources and supplies all equipment and material, with the yard’s role largely limited to formulating the detailed plan and putting it in place, under the Navy’s supervision.

    Weapon integration

    “It will be a real challenge for the yard once the hull construction gets over. The Navy will do some hand-holding when it comes to weapon integration. But the yard has to also set up fully integrated command-control networks like platform management and communication systems, which will be a real test of its capability, skill and adaptability,” said a defence official on condition of anonymity. Being a large vessel, the Vikrant will have some 2,500 km of cabling and nearly 70 km of pipe-network.

    While work is apace to lay out cables and wires, obsolescence of equipment already delivered and kept in store for a few years is troubling the yard.

    Some of the equipment, including the huge gas turbines, will have outlived their guarantee period by the time they go into the vessel and will be ready for trials.

    “It will be a phase fraught with teething troubles. That the equipment on trial would be past their guarantee date is a little worrisome,” said an official.
     
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  7. Gessler

    Gessler Mod MODERATOR

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    GE Powers India's First Aircraft Carrier

    [​IMG]

    GE Marine, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, announced that four GE LM2500 gas turbines will soon power the Indian Navy’s INS Vikrant, providing 80 megawatts for the country’s first indigenous aircraft carrier. Similar to the INS Vikrant itself, the ship’s propulsion plant (four LM2500 gas turbine modules) were manufactured in India by Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd.’s (HAL) Industrial & Marine Gas Turbine (IMGT) Division.

    Through its license with GE, HAL assembled, inspected and tested the LM2500 gas turbines and module enclosures for INS Vikrant. The IMGT Division’s Bangalore facility provides comprehensive support including inspection, spare parts, maintenance, equipment overhauls and assembly for industrial and marine gas turbines under license. GE LM2500 gas turbine modules assembled and tested by HAL also power the Indian Navy’s INS Satpura, INS Sahyadri and INS Shivalik stealth frigates. To date, GE has delivered 10 gas turbine module kits to HAL for the Indian Navy. According to the Indian Navy, the LM2500 gas turbines were installed prior to the ship's launch on August 12, 2013. The aircraft carrier will undergo extensive trials before being handed over to the Indian Navy in late 2016/early 2017.

    [​IMG]
    General Electric LM2500+ gas-turbine (Photo: GE)

    Source: GE Powers India?s First Aircraft Carrier

    So LiveFist was right about the red-colored part...the propulsion was already installed when the
    ship was launched on August 12 this year.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2013
  8. Hidalgo

    Hidalgo 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Is there any update on 2nd phase of working???
     
  9. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Vikrant hull nearly completed.

    Principle approval for construction of a whole new drydock at the public sector Cochin Shipyard (CSL) at an estimated cost of Rs 1,200 crore notwithstanding, the yard is left with just one commercial order at the moment.

    With the hull fabrication work of the indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant nearing completion by the year-end, the hull shop of CSL will be without work in a few months.

    The hull shop, having a capacity to fabricate over 1,500 tonnes every month, has been under-utilised since July last year for want of orders barring the fast patrol vessels (FPVs) for the Coast Guard which need just about 100 tonnes of fabrication apiece and a platform supply vessel for Norwegian owners.

    While outfitting and shafting have gathered momentum on Vikrant, the carrier is gearing up for its launch from the building bay by the end of the year, indicate sources.

    The carrier only has about 1,200 tonnes of steel left to go on the structure. Right now, it has a tonnage of about 24,000.”

    The yard was pinning it hopes on bagging meaty defence orders like at least one of the four Landing Platform Docks (LPDs), each weighing 20,000 tonnes, that the Indian Navy intends to procure. However, it was disallowed to take part in the tendering process citing the ongoing Vikrant construction despite being the only Indian yard with a proven capability and capacity to execute a project of that scale.

    A committee appointed following an outcry against the move threw open the possibility of construction of two LPDs between Hindustan Shipyard, another public sector yard which was nominated for the project, and the CSL, but the report was firmly set aside. Nevertheless, the yard continues to bid for defence projects, the latest being the tender for new generation anti-submarine corvettes.

    Sources say excluding the carrier, construction of the FPVs, the PSV and the buoy tender vessel for the Directorate of Light Houses and Light Ships will all be over by the year-end or in the first quarter of 2015.

    The planned drydock, they contend, is to cater to multiple segments like underwater repair of rigs and semi-submersibles, LNG carriers (four being planed by GAIL) and bigger defence vessels.

    The yard has already been qualified by the ONGC for offshore fabrication. “We are on the look out for opportunities in this sector,” says an official.

    The proposed drydock will have an overall length of 300 metres, with the first 135 metres having a width of 100 metres and the remaining 165 metres having a tapered width of 65 metres.

    Cochin Shipyard stares at a lean order book | idrw.org
     
  10. anand_bis

    anand_bis IDF NewBie

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  11. tusharm

    tusharm Captain FULL MEMBER

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  12. Bismarck

    Bismarck BANNED BANNED

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    Since we have Vikramaditya, Vikrant and Vishal,
    The next two I hope to be named Vijay (Victory) and Vishwanath (Lord of the world)
     
  13. Bismarck

    Bismarck BANNED BANNED

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    If you dream enough you will believe
    When you believe enough, you will put in resources to fulfill the dream
    Once you fulfilled the dream then its the next dream

    India dreamt of thrashing congress party. and well we did it. This is just a nuclear carrier
     
    Vidyanshu, Sree and venureddy like this.
  14. m2monty

    m2monty Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    WHY TOO MUCH YEARS ,,,???
     
  15. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    St. Petersburg’s Proletarski Zavod (Proletarian Factory) will supply arresting gears and breaking machines for the under construction INS Vikrant aircraft carrier. The Russian enterprise has already supplied similar equipment for the INS Vikramaditya, Yury Skorikov, the factory’s general director told Tass.

    “A contract has been signed with the Indian side. We are making arresting gears for the Vikrant aircraft carrier,” Skorikov said. He added that the enterprise is now considering an agreement on post-guarantee servicing of the arresting gears that are already found in the Vikramaditya since the basic time period of the warranty has already run out.

    “We’ve already put braking machines on the Vikramaditya and are manufacturing them for the Vikrant aircraft carrier. Presumably the breaking machines for the Vikrant will be supplied in 2015,” Skorikov said.

    The St. Petersburg enterprise also produces arresting gears for naval aviation pilot training complexes in Yeysk, Russia as well as in the Indian state of Goa. “Four arresting gears were delivered to Yeysk and the first machine has already been installed,” said Skorikov. “Deliveries were completed in 2013. Right now the equipment is being mounted.”

    Proletarski Zavod is one of the oldest machine-building enterprises in St Petersburg. It specialises in marine and power engineering. According to its website, ship mechanisms, systems and complexes, that in certain cases do not have any analogues in home industry, are created at the factory.

    The INS Vikrant is the first aircraft carrier built in India. The ship was “launched” in 2013 and construction is expected to be completed by 2016. The first ship of the Vikrant class of aircraft carriers is expected to be commissioned in 2018. Work is currently going on in the Cochin Shipyard in the Indian state of Kerala.

    The aircraft carrier is 262 metres long and 60 metres wide, and displaces about 40,000 metric tons. The deck will be able to accommodate 30 aircrafts and is expected to host MiG 29K and Tejas aircrafts, as well as Kamov Ka-31 aircrafts. India will keep a squadron of 17 MiG 29s on the INS Vikrant to protect its eastern seaboard. Russia will deliver the second squadron of aircraft meant for the indigenous aircraft carrier by 2015.

    St Petersburg enterprise to supply arresting gear for INS Vikrant | Russia & India Report
     

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