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Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC) News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by CONNAN, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. lca-fan

    lca-fan Captain FULL MEMBER

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  2. Sancho

    Sancho Major Technical Analyst

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    Hopefully, the important point however will be, how expensive the deal will be and what US stuff we need to buy, under what conditions? They surely won't make it easy for us.
     
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  3. nik141993

    nik141993 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    could you upload the pic again, I can't see it
     
  4. Sancho

    Sancho Major Technical Analyst

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    Is there any official source available, for the dimensions of the lift and the hangar of IAC1?
     
  5. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Indian Navy may soon approach government for second indigenous aircraft carrier
    Published April 19, 2017
    SOURCE: IANS

    [​IMG]

    Discussions are on within the Indian Navy over the second aircraft carrier planned to be built in the country and it is likely to approach the government with a proposal in another two to three months, a senior Navy officer said on Tuesday.

    Controller of Warship Production and Acquisition Vice Admiral D.M. Deshpande noted that there is a “bit of question mark” from the Defence Ministry’s side due to the huge cost involved but added that there was a lot of “positivity”.

    “Lots of discussions are right now on within the Navy what type of an aircraft carrier we want, right from the tonnage, type of propulsion… We are debating on this. Once this debate is more or less within the Navy… we are clear on exactly what we want, we will take up this case with the ministry,” he said at the curtain-raiser event of seminar ‘Building India’s Future Navy’, set to be organised by industry chamber Ficci on May 31-June 1.

    Deshpande said everyone wanted to be clear on the “requirement” before a final decision is taken.

    “Right now there is a bit of question mark from the ministry’s side because we have taken this up with the ministry on a few occasions… it is a huge ticket decision, and before some commitments are made on allocation of these funds everybody wants to be very clear on the requirements… these are being addressed before we take that up with the government for final clearance,” he said.

    He said there was “positivity”, but added that the “big ticket” aircraft carrier will come at the expense of other things.

    “There is lot of positivity, both from government side as well as from the Navy. I am sure within two-to-three months, we should be able to take it up with the ministry to get the funds. It is a very big ticket item, it will have to be at the expense of things, we need to take these calls before we can go about doing it,” he said.

    India at present has only one aircraft carrier, INS Vikramaditya — a modified Russian Kiev-class aircraft carrier.

    The other aircraft carrier — INS Viraat, a British-built ship serving with the Indian Navy and the oldest carrier in service — retired on March 6.

    India’s first indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant, a 40,000-tonne ship, is meanwhile being built for the Indian Navy by Cochin Shipyard.

    India at any time requires three aircraft carriers, one each on the east and west coasts, and a third one as a replacement for any of the ships that go for refit.

    On May 13, 2015, the Defence Acquisition Council cleared construction of a second aircraft carrier and Rs 30 crore was allotted for the preparations.

    The second indigenous aircraft carrier is likely to be nuclear-propelled.
     
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  6. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Question mark looms over India’s aircraft carrier
    Published April 20, 2017
    SOURCE: Ajai Shukla / REDIFF

    [​IMG]

    As Beijing decisively implements its vision of aircraft carrier-based naval power, New Delhi seems uncertain about the form and structure of its naval combat aviation.

    Last month, China’s defence ministry announced the impending launch of Shandong, its first indigenous aircraft carrier. On Friday, a Beijing-based naval expert revealed that the People’s Liberation Army (Navy)’s, third carrier could be a US Navy-style nuclear-powered vessel, featuring an electromagnetic aircraft launch system.

    In New Delhi, however, a senior navy admiral revealed uncertainty about India’s indigenous aircraft carrier programme. The first indigenous aircraft carrier, named INS Vikrant, will roll out of Cochin Shipyard Ltd later this decade. But the navy and the ministry are still making up their minds about its successor, IAC-2.

    Vice Admiral D M Deshpande, the navy’s warship acquisition head, stated on Tuesday that the ministry remains uncertain about spending billions of dollars on a carrier.

    “Right now there is a bit of a question mark from the ministry’s side, [although] we have taken this up to the ministry on a few occasions. [An aircraft carrier] is a huge ticket item and, before some commitments are made on allocation of these funds everybody wants to be very clear on the requirement, whether we actually need that. So these are being addressed [before] we actually take it up to the government for final clearances”, said Deshpande, addressing defence industrialists in New Delhi.

    The three services are competing for the same limited budget. With the cost of INS Vikrant reportedly nudging $4 billion, the Indian Air Force argues that land-based combat aircraft, with their ranges enhanced with in-flight refuelling, would project offensive air power more cheaply than an aircraft carrier. The navy counters that an aircraft carrier is a mobile air base, that can move to a combat zone quickly.

    Even within the navy, some argue that the same amount spent on submarines, or a larger number of smaller surface warships like destroyers, frigates and corvettes, would generate greater combat effect than a carrier.



    This is the longstanding debate between sea denial (denying the enemy the use of the sea, primarily with submarines) and sea control (dominating the ocean with air and surface power, built around a carrier). Sea control requires massive spending on carrier battle groups, or CBGs — an aircraft carrier and the warships that accompany it. In contrast, sea denial is a defensive strategy that takes less money — the cost of a submarine-based force.

    Powerful, modern navies — like the US Navy, the Royal Navy, the French, Russian and now even the PLA-N — have all built their fleets around aircraft carriers, enabling the projection of power to large distances from home bases.

    Although the Indian Navy has decisively opted for aircraft carriers, discussion continues over whether to build a large, nuclear-powered carrier, or a smaller one like IAC-1. Reflecting this, Deshpande says: “There are lots of discussions within the navy on what type of IAC-2 we want. From the tonnage to the propulsion — we are debating on this. Once we are more or less clear within the navy [about] what exactly we want, we would take up the case with the ministry for various approvals.”

    The navy is inclined towards a 65,000-tonne, nuclear powered carrier that embarks 55 combat aircraft; and a state-of-the-art EMALS catapult that can rapidly launch fighter aircraft as well as larger aircraft for electronic warfare and airborne early warning. The name being suggested for IAC-2 is INS Vishal.

    Deshpande expresses confidence that “in the next two-three months, we should be in a position to take it up to the ministry to get the funds”. With INS Vikrant likely to be operationally ready only in 2023 — eight years late — there is little time to lose.

    Currently, the PLA-N operates only its first-ever carrier, the 65,000-tonne Liaoning, which Beijing bought from Russia, refurbished, and commissioned in 2012. India, with far greater experience, has operated at least one aircraft carrier ever since INS Vikrant joined the fleet in 1961.

    The PLA-N, however, now plans to commission and operate at least 5-6 carriers. The Indian Navy plans to operate a fleet of three aircraft carriers.
     
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  7. Sancho

    Sancho Major Technical Analyst

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    Let's take this to the appropriate thread.

    Not at all, since you can retain with the good changes for commonality and ease of development, while you have more freedom for improvements. The most obvious mistake was to go for different engines don't you think? Not alone did it delayed the construction of IAC 1, but also increased logistical needs of both carriers and IN.
     
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  8. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Maybe the naval architects of DND wanted to cut their teeth on AC design. Who knows?

    Gorshkov was steam propelled & I don't think IN is interested in that anymore. Even with our experience & the manufacturing capabilities of BHEL Bhopal.
     
  9. Bregs

    Bregs 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    which fighter aircraft has finally been chosen for IAC 1 ?
     
  10. Sancho

    Sancho Major Technical Analyst

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    Which is the problem I meantioned. Our scientists use this kind of developments, mainly for their own sake, rather than a speedy and less risky delivery to the forces. DRDO is the prime example for that, since their aim is not proper support of the forces, but being world class. They don't care about delays or fulfilling development requirements and that's where indigenous developments and constructions start to fail.

    None so far, IN has just sent our an RFI.
     
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  11. Bregs

    Bregs 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    It means the roll out of ship itself will be delayed that's why so much delay in the process of acquiring naval fighter
     
  12. Sancho

    Sancho Major Technical Analyst

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    Not necessarily, since we do have enough Migs to spread them on both carries as an interim option. I still wonder how much life the Sea Harriers have in them? We paid a lot to upgrade them and only because Viraat was phased out, doesn't mean we should stop using them.
     
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