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INDO-US Defence Cooperation

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by CONNAN, Jan 14, 2011.

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  1. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    14 January 2011


    Washington: In line with commitments made by president Barack Obama, the United States department of commerce has set in motion regulatory changes aimed at lifting the ban on trade with Indian defence entities like the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO).

    The United States of America had placed curbs on trade with these entities following India's nuclear tests in 1998.

    According to top US officials a formal notification to lift the ban by the US department of commerce is in an advanced stage.

    "These regulatory changes will begin the transformation of the bilateral export control policies to realise the full potential of the strategic partnership between our two countries," Eric Hirschhorn, under-secretary for industry and security, US department of commerce, informed agencies.

    Hirschhorn, however, did not provide a timeframe in which the proposed action would be completed. Official sources have indicated that a formal notification in this regard could well be issued before the scheduled India visit of commerce secretary Gary Locke which is due between 6-11 February.

    "The department of commerce is working quickly to publish a regulation that will remove Indian space and defence-related entities from the Entity List and enact other India-specific export control changes," a senior US official said.

    In the course of his India visit, president Obama had assured India he would remove these organisations from the Entity List.

    "Commensurate with India's non-proliferation record and commitment to abide by multilateral export control standards, the US will remove all civil space and defence-related entities from the department of commerce "Entity List."

    "Inclusion on this list generally triggers an export license requirement when exported," said a fact sheet issued by the White House during president Obama's visit to India.

    domain-b.com : US to soon remove ISRO, DRDO from Entity List
     
  2. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. likely to lift ban on ISRO, DRDO soon

    The U.S., which imposed curbs on trade with defence entities like ISRO and DRDO following India’s nuclear tests in 1998, has set in motion regulatory changes to lift the ban soon, thus fulfilling a commitment made by President Barack Obama.

    A formal notification to lift the ban by the U.S. Department of Commerce for this purpose is in advanced stage, top U.S. officials said.

    “These regulatory changes will begin the transformation of the bilateral export control policies to realise the full potential of the strategic partnership between our two countries,” Eric Hirschhorn, Under Secretary for Industry and Security, U.S. Department of Commerce, told PTI.

    But he did not give any time line for the removal of restrictions, which is eagerly awaited in India.

    However, official sources said a formal notification in this regard could well be issued before the scheduled India visit of Commerce Secretary Gary Locke from February 6-11.

    U.S. imposed curbs on trade with these defence entities in the wake nuclear tests carried out by India in 1998.

    “The Department of Commerce is working quickly to publish a regulation that will remove Indian space and defence-related entities from the Entity List and enact other India-specific export control changes,” a senior U.S. official said.

    They clarified these notifications would be India specific.

    “We have a separate track on these issues in partnership with India,” another Administration official said.

    “As you’ll recall, in New Delhi, the President together with the Prime Minister announced a resolution of unilateral export control issues and the President announced his support for India in multilateral fora. That has not changed and we continue to move forward on those steps,” the official said.

    Mr. Obama, during his India visit, had assured India that he would remove these companies from the entities list.

    “Commensurate with India’s non-proliferation record and commitment to abide by multilateral export control standards, the US will remove all civil space and defence-related entities from the Department of Commerce “Entity List.”

    “Inclusion on this list generally triggers an export license requirement when exported,” said a fact sheet issued by the White House during the Obama visit.

    The Hindu : News / National : U.S. likely to lift ban on ISRO, DRDO soon
     
  3. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Top US firms embark on sales mission to India

    Washington, Jan 14 (IANS) Top US companies like Boeing, Lockheed Martin, GE-Hitachi and Westinghouse are among 24 businesses embarking on a mission to India next month to pitch their high-tech ware from civil nuclear to defence and civil aviation fields.

    Leading the Feb 6-11 business development mission to India will be US Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, who accompanied President Barack Obama to India in November last year, the US commerce department announced Friday.

    More than $10 billion in business deals between US companies and Indian private sector and government entities, supporting 50,000 American jobs, were signed during the Obama visit.

    Besides the aviation, defence and nuclear power majors, other businesses joining the trade mission are based in 13 states across the country and more than half of them are small and medium-sized companies, the department said.

    The delegation, which also includes senior officials from the Export-Import Bank (EX-IM) and the Trade Development Agency (TDA), will make stops in New Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore.

    During the trip, Locke will highlight export opportunities for US businesses in the advanced industrial sectors, of civil-nuclear trade, defence and security, civil aviation, and information and communication technologies.

    "Exports are leading the US economic recovery, spurring future economic growth and creating jobs in America," Locke said.

    "The business leaders joining me on this mission see the great potential to sell their goods and services to India, helping drive innovation and create jobs in both countries."

    The India business development mission will help build on the exporting success US companies had in 2010 - up 17 percent compared to 2009, the commerce department said.

    The delegation comprises ABSi Corporation, Aero Controls Inc., Curtiss-Wright Flow Control, Exelon Nuclear Partners, FLIR Systems Inc., Fluidic Energy, GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Inc., Intuit Inc., Kent Displays, Kulite Semiconductor Products Inc., Lockheed Martin Corporation, nLIGHT Corporation, North Star Aerospace Inc., NuScale Power Inc., Oshkosh Corporation, Palantir Technologies, Pelican Products Inc., Rajant Corporation, Rapiscan Systems Inc., The Boeing Company, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Transco Products Inc., VeriSign Inc. and Westinghouse Electric Company LLC.

    Mangalorean.Com- Serving Mangaloreans Around The World!
     
  4. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US firms to tap homeland security market in India

    While defence and military aviation deals will be at the head of the business table at Aero India 2011, set to begin here next week, companies from the United States, following growing strategic India-US co-operation in recent times, will also be making an aggressive push for a piece of a projected $10 billion homeland security market in India over the next three years.

    Like in the case of Aero India 2009, which occurred in the backdrop of the 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai, the US-India Business Council has its agenda spelt out this week for the premier air show and has outlined exploration of business prospects in the homeland security market as key agenda.

    The US business focus on the homeland security market in India comes in the light of close collaboration on homeland security between the two countries in the post 26/11 scenario through a Strategic Dialogue and a Joint Working Group on Counter-Terrorism (CTJWG).


    The homeland security component “will focus on translating policy cooperation and goodwill between the two countries into business opportunities and export growth for US companies,â€￾ says the USIBC.

    Over the next three years, India is expected to procure more than $10 billion in state-of-the-art commercial and homeland security technology products, solutions, and services for border protection, marine security, counter insurgency, city surveillance, intelligence infrastructure, and other critical security infrastructure needs,â€￾ says the business council.

    Increased investment in homeland security equipment has been evident with state police forces purchasing equipment like state-of-the-art bomb disposal vehicles, wireless surveillance systems, advanced firearms and night vision equipment in the post 26/11 scenario around the country.

    Among other interesting areas in the USIBC agenda for Aero India 2011 is a workshop in collaboration with the Indian ministry of defence to fathom the defence offset policy following the recent issuance of a revised defence procurement procedure by the MoD.

    The workshop comes in the light of US and European defence manufacturers writing “an unprecedented letter to the Indian MoD in August 2010, suggesting reforms in key areas of India’s defense offsets policyâ€￾.

    According to the USIBC its priority at Aero India would be to build on the goodwill from US President Barack Obama’s visit to India last November and “to focus on discrete, achievable advocacy priorities in advance of a busy bilateral dialogue agenda for 2011â€￾.

    The bilateral agenda for the first half of 2011 includes meetings of the High Technology Cooperation Group, Defense Procurement and Production Group and the US-India Strategic Dialogue.

    The US delegation at Aero India will feature apart from US ambassador Timothy Roemer, commerce secretary Gary Locke and the director of the US defence security co-operation agency, Vice Admiral William E Landay.

    The US will, like at the last edition, have the largest number of military aircraft on display at Aero India 2011 with five F-16IN Super Vipers, two F/A-l81N Super Hornet; one C-17, one1 KC 135 one WC130J Weatherbird, one 707 Omega, and a fifth generation fighter the F-22 Raptor on static display.

    http://www.indiandefence.com/forums/newthread.php?do=newthread&f=32
     
  5. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: US firms to tap homeland security market in India

    It would be smarter if we could trade with Israel on as sensitive matters such as homeland security, after considering the amount of headache US government has given vis-a-vis David Coleman Headley a.k.a Dawood Rana.

    Though US might have the world's most advanced homeland security system, we should be careful especially in taking simply technical expertise and modifying it for our convenience and surroundings. Just expressing an opinion that though training should be with US for obvious reasons (the way they keep a track of people, no one does) but security systems that they make should be checked in software itself. We don't want programs running dually relaying all that we plan to Pentagon now, do we? :hang3:
     
  6. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US exports to India for jobs at home

    Gary Locke, the US trade secretary, has come to India with a business delegation days before the country’s largest annual air show hoping to promote exports of leading US techonologies and services related to civil aviation as well as defence, homeland security and ICT.

    While India’s interests have been restricted to fighter jets and other military hardware in recent months, the country has also seen a slew of deals between domestic airlines and big industry names including Boeing and Airbus. Now the US wants a slice of the cake, not least because India is expected to become one of the top five civil aviation markets in the world over the next five years, according to US trade mission paper for Locke’s visit.

    Domestic passenger travel grew by 22 per cent to 25.7m passengers between January and June 2010 compared to the same period the previous year. Both Boeing and Airbus forecast India’s demand for aircraft to exceed 1,000 aircraft worth more than $130bn over the next five to seven years.

    The US is looking to cash-in on one of the fastest-growing and dynamic emerging markets where more than 500m people, 50 per cent of India’s people and more than the entire US population, will enter the country’s middle class over the next 15 years.

    In 2009, US exports to India (mainly in sectors such as aerospace, electronics and ICT) amounted to $16.4bn and were up 24 per cent in the first six months of 2010.

    But, while the intentions to increase bilateral trade remain, Locke also highlighted his concerns over India’s restrictive trade policy, saying it hindered investment in spite of growing economic and security ties.

    “Even though India has made tremendous strides to open up its economy, there is much more work that is left to be done,†Locke told a business summit in New Delhi pointing out that the country ranked 134 out of 183 on the World Bank’s ease of doing business scale

    “While many tariffs have come down, others remain. Even when there are not outright tariffs there are non-tariff barriers that limit trade and investment,†said Locke, speaking after a meeting with Anand Sharma, the Indian trade minister reviewing issues such as market access and non-tariff barriers.

    A bilateral trade boom has seen total flows treble to $36.5 bn in goods between 1990 and 2010, but the US slipped from number one to three in India’s trading partners, due mainly to decreased US investment in India’s IT sector. India lags China, as the United States’ third biggest trading partner.

    The Obama administration wants to double its exports to bolster domestic growth and create jobs while India wants to see investment in key infrastructure projects.

    Anand Sharma, said “don’t wait, come now†to US business leaders present at the summit saying that India “will not let them down.â€

    However, while limits on foreign direct investment in key sectors and a somewhat hostile business environment remain, Sharma’s proposal to take a leap of faith may fall on deaf ears, dampening the aspirations of both nations.

    US exports to India for jobs at home | beyondbrics | News and views on emerging markets from the Financial Times
     
  7. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US asks India to lower tariffs, remove barriers

    Promising to further ease restrictions and licences that hold back export of dual-use technologies to India, US commerce secretary Gary Locke on Monday pledged to partner India in its development as he urged Asia’s third largest economy to lower tariffs and remove non-tariff barriers to trade, including the inadequate protection for intellectual property rights.

    Locke is on a six-day visit at the head of a 24-member delegation that includes civil nuclear power majors such as Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy LtdWestinghouse Electric Company LLC, besides aviation and defence giants such as Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp.

    The visit follows the US administration removing nine Indian state-run firms falling under the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) and the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) from the “Entities Listâ€â€”that US companies were prohibited from doing business with. The US further elevated India from a category titled “country of concern†to bring it on par with many European partners, a move that would smoothen the procurement of licences for the import of dual use technologies by Indian companies.

    The steps are seen as part of an effort by the US to boost its sluggish economy and create more jobs at home in line with President Barack Obama’s plans outlined last year to double US exports in the next five years.

    In his speech to the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), Locke referred to the steps already taken and promised to further ease restrictions that bar cutting-edge, high-technology trade that India has been seeking for years to propel it to a higher growth trajectory.

    “Further changes to US export control policies towards India will continue in the months ahead,†he said. The US commerce department along with the defence department and the state department are trying “to simplify all our regulations and allowing US companies to export within the US department of commerce regime, using a licence free approach. If these products which have dual use applications—commercial use that can also have military applications—that many of these items can be exported without a licence... All signifies that we are trying to reform our export controls in the United States,†Locke added later.

    While stressing the US’ credentials to partner India in its development—in building infrastructure and creating jobs —Locke, however, raised concerns over barriers hampering US investment in India— “ranging from 19% levies on civil aviation aircraft, 30% on pistachios, 26% on X-ray films and 50% on applesâ€. Non-tariff barriers included limits on foreign direct investment in key sectors and inadequate protection for intellectual property rights, he said.

    Bilateral trade between India and the US was $37 billion (Rs.1.7 trillion) in 2009, according to US commerce department data.

    In his response, commerce minister Anand Sharma said market-opening reforms would move forward though at an “incremental†pace. He invited US firms to invest in agriculture, food processing, infrastructure and energy generation while defending India’s record on intellectual property rights. Sharma also sought US help to boost the contribution of Indian manufacturing to gross domestic product from the current 16% to 25%.

    “We will be coming out soon with a national manufacturing policy. We propose to develop mega manufacturing and investment zones not only to attract investment but also technology,†Sharma said, adding he hoped to make India one of the “workshops†of the world.

    Locke’s engagements in Delhi included meetings with civil aviation minister Vayalar Ravi. After the meeting, Ravi said India and the US would be signing the Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement that paves the way for mutual acceptance of aeronautical products and parts developed in either country.

    US asks India to lower tariffs, remove barriers - Home - livemint.com
     
  8. bhagat

    bhagat 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    U.S. official in India to discuss defence, trade

    Ahead of the Defence Policy Group meeting in Washington next month, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs, Andrew J. Shapiro, is in India beginning from Tuesday to hold a series of discussions with his Indian counterparts on defence and trade related issues.

    The State Department, in a statement, said Mr. Shapiro’s four day India visit is aimed at building on the achievements of the November trip of U.S. President Barack Obama.

    “The visit’s agenda reflects the President’s initiative to craft an indispensable partnership with India which will shape a secure and prosperous 21st century,â€￾ the statement said.

    His visit, accompanying Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, comes at a time when the U.S. is seeking to increase significantly the volume and technological sophistication of U.S. defence sales to India, the State Department said.

    Mr. Shapiro will also attend the Aero India 2011 air show and aviation exhibition in Bangalore, followed by meetings with senior civilian and military officials in New Delhi to discuss defence trade issues.

    The officials will discuss maritime security and counter-piracy cooperation.

    India has been an active participant in the 60-nation Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia, and joins the U.S. among countries contributing naval forces to patrol regional waters.

    The officials will also discuss support to international peacekeeping through the Global Peace Operations Initiative.

    At Aero India, Assistant Secretary Shapiro will meet with Indian defence officials and industry representatives, who will be welcoming the arrival of the first of six C-130J aircraft under a recent USD 950 million purchase.

    The aircraft will provide the Indian Air Force with advanced strategic and humanitarian airlift capabilities.

    Two US companies are also currently competing for India’s USD 11 billion Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) tender, the State Department said.

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/article1166996.ece
     
  9. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Defence without industry?

    As the Aero India show gets under way in Bengaluru today, two facts are worth dwelling on. India is  and has been for three years  the world’s largest importer of defence hardware. Also, in a list of the 15 largest exporters of defence hardware, India simply does not figure. No other country with a serious defence budget has such a skewed import-export picture. Only one conclusion is possible: something has gone seriously wrong with the indigenisation effort, and with the building of a competitive defence hardware industry.

    Not long ago, it had looked like a new leaf was being turned. The economist Vijay Kelkar had submitted a report suggesting (among other things) that private sector participation be encouraged when it came to defence production. After some initial steps in this direction, the government backtracked. Now, it is watering down the offsets condition that would have used import contracts to support related domestic manufacture (read Ajai Shukla in Broadsword on this page yesterday). There are large industrial houses that are capable of making a contribution, and indeed have shown interest in the business, but they are being systematically discouraged. The beneficiaries are not public sector rivals, as some might imagine, but international suppliers. If something is not done to change this situation, the skew in the import-export picture will continue to bear testimony to the failure of indigenisation in a vital area.

    It need not be this way. Indigenisation of defence production began half a century ago, under a defence minister (V K Krishna Menon) who rightly carries some of the blame for the disaster of the China border war in 1962, but who was nonetheless the pioneer in promoting indigenous defence production. The country is not short of success stories even today. Hindustan Aeronautics (HAL) is basking in the afterglow of having launched its own combat aircraft (the Tejas), which stands up well in international comparisons and costs less than the foreign alternatives. HAL has also launched a combat helicopter (Dhruva) that enjoys an international market, and supplies sub-assemblies to Boeing and Gulfstream for civilian aircraft. It is now working with the Russians on a fifth generation fighter, comes 34th in a ranking of the world’s 100 largest defence manufacturers, and has a very healthy bottom line.

    The country needs not one but many HALs, and it is a pity that the only other Indian company in the list of leading defence firms is Bharat Electronics. To be sure, some smaller companies are making a contribution, like the shipyards that are building an impressive array of naval vessels, ranging all the way from stealth destroyers to a nuclear submarine and an aircraft carrier. Also, for all its chequered history, the Arjun tank is now serving the army. But at a time when the country’s defence needs are growing because of a deteriorating security situation and an expanding horizon for the navy, domestic defence production needs a quantum leap. When the ticket size for international acquisitions is multiplying, it would be criminal failure of policy if more of the value addition involved does not take place in India, and if Indian designers and engineers are denied the opportunity to work on cutting-edge technologies that will inevitably have civilian spin-offs. This much is clear: current attitudes in the defence ministry will not deliver what is needed.

    Defence without industry?
     
  10. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Why India-US defence deals have become big business

    Hitting the tarmac at the Hindon airbase near the Indian capital, the C130 J Super Hercules is the Indian Air Force's latest acquisition.

    It is one of six military transport aircraft ordered from the US in a deal worth almost $1bn.

    Aimed at enhancing the special operations capacity of the Indian armed forces, it is the first major US defence sale to India in over 10 years.

    For the American manufacturer Lockheed Martin, the arrival of its fleet is a step forward.

    "The Indian government is slowly expanding its scope to different avenues to acquire different products," says its Chief Executive, Roger Rose.

    "With the C130 J, we will be here for 30 years and we expect to expand in other areas as well."

    This week, Lockheed Martin is taking part in the Aero India show in Bangalore, where some of the top aircraft manufacturers from around the world will display their latest wares.
    Economic opportunity

    India is looking to spend more than $50bn over the next five years to modernise its armed forces, including a $10bn deal to buy 126 new fighter jets.

    Lockheed is hoping it will win the country's biggest defence contract and sell its F-16IN Super Viper combat aircraft.

    With the US economy still recovering, it is countries like India that present an opportunity to American firms.

    On a mission to turn warming political ties into business, US Commerce Secretary Gary Locke is visiting India this week.

    With him are leaders of 24 US companies, including major players in defence and nuclear power.

    It comes shortly after Washington ended most restrictions on sensitive technology exports to Delhi.

    Secretary Locke is hoping to seize on the opening and boost American exports to India. And by promoting hi-technology goods, Mr Locke wants to create more job opportunities back home.

    His trip is the first by a US cabinet member to India since President Obama's visit in November.

    "When President Obama came to India and said I want to seek India's help in creating jobs, what he did not say is that one Boeing or another company's aircraft we buy produces 10,000 jobs in the US," says Dr Amit Mitra, the secretary general of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI).

    He adds that India is a big job creator in the US, a reason why Mr Locke is making stops in Delhi, Mumbai (Bombay) and Bangalore to cut more deals.

    As more American businesses hope to enter the hi-tech sector in India, it is local companies like Samtel Display Systems that want to benefit as well.

    'New collaborations'

    At its manufacturing lab in the outskirts of Delhi, technicians are mounting and testing electrical units.

    Samtel develops cockpit display systems for military and commercial use.

    The company's Executive Director, Puneet Kaura, says better trade relations between the US and India means it can get its hands on technology that has been so far inaccessible due to export restrictions.

    "While the US is entering the Indian market, we are also getting access to some state-of-the-art technologies which will be to the benefit of our customers," said Mr Kaura.

    "This wasn't happening before and with this new change I think the scenario will look very different in coming years. It would be in the form of new business opportunities, new collaborations on the technology front and redefining the future as we move forward."

    India is fast transforming itself from a regional power to a global giant. Its rapid growth has managed to grasp the attention of many Western economies including America.

    By forging closer defence and trade ties, it is now becoming a key market for the Obama administration's National Export Initiative (NEI), which aims to double US exports in five years.

    But while it is helping the American economy to recover, India hopes that better trade relations will also be beneficial for its own local companies, many of which share Mr Kaura's eagerness to acquire up-to-date equipment from overseas.

    BBC News - Why India-US defence deals have become big business
     
  11. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US firms to explore tie-ups with DRDO, HAL

    BANGALORE: A US business delegation, including firms keen on the defence, space and communication sectors, is here to explore opportunities for tie-ups with institutions like DRDO and ISRO during the AeroIndia international air show beginning Wednesday.

    Led by US commerce secretary Gary Locke, the delegation's efforts come after the US recently removed India's Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) from the entity list that bans hi-tech exports.

    In a clear shift in the economic ties between the two countries after US President Barack Obama's visit to India last November, 24 companies are in Bangalore to hold discussions with DRDO's laboratories and defence production unit Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) on trade possibilities in defence, space and communication technologies.

    Locke, who arrived here on Tuesday, told reporters that the American business delegation was here "to explore opportunities" with DRDO and HAL.

    "The removal of these laboratories and institutions from the entity list, we believe, is a huge symbol of enhanced cooperation between the two countries," he said while replying to a question in this regard.

    On much more serious international issues such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, US Ambassador to India Timothy A. Roemer said the two governments were working on two tracks.

    One was a permanent seat for India in the UN Security Council and the removal of institutions from entity list and the other regarding international groupings in which India could be a part of.

    "We will come to it and you will see it happen in a year or two," he said.

    On the controversial bilateral Communications Interoperability and Security Memoradum of Agreement (CISMOA) and Basic Exchange and Cooperation Agreement for Geo-Spatial Cooperation (BECA) that India was reluctant to sign, Roemer said it was up to the Indian government to decide when it wanted to enter into these foundational agreements.

    "The US enters into these agreements only with closest allies, particularly our NATO allies. It would also ensure a lot of super technologies to flow. It is the Indian government that will decide and we are not pushing it," he added.

    Addressing an aerospace seminar Monday, India's Defence Minister A.K. Antony had referred to what he claimed was second grade technologies being transferred to India as part of the defence deals.

    Asked about the remark, US Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs Andrew Shapiro gave the example of the medium multi-role combat aircraft tender, in which American companies were offering the latest technology "at an unprecedented level," to stress that the US was offering the "most desirable technology".

    Shapiro also noted that the civil nuclear agreement too was for high technology transfers.


    US firms to explore tie-ups with DRDO, HAL - The Times of India
     
  12. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US seeks to expand military cooperation with India: Pentagon

    The US seeks to expand military cooperation with India on a range of issues like non-proliferation and counter-terrorism as part of efforts to catalyse greater security cooperation in Asia, according to a Pentagon report.

    "As our military capability and capacity increases in Asia, we will seek new ways to catalyse greater regional security cooperation. Leveraging our convening power, we will expand the scope and participation of multilateral exercises across the region," said the report titled 'The National Military Strategy of the United States of America 2011'.

    "We seek expanded military cooperation with India on non-proliferation, safeguarding the global commons, countering terrorism, and elsewhere," the 24-page report said.

    The Pentagon will also expand military cooperation, exchanges and exercises with Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, and other states in Oceania, working with them to address domestic and common foreign threats to their integrity and security, it said.

    "This will also help ensure we maintain a sustainable and diversified presence and operational access in the region. Lastly, we strongly encourage the development of security ties and commitments that are emerging among our allies and partners in the region," the report said.

    This helps strengthen regional norms and demonstrates increased responsibility and cooperation in addressing regional security challenges, it said.

    The National Military Strategy 2011 argued that US is at a strategic inflection point and must adjust to a redistribution of power in the international order.

    Observing that the US seeks a positive, cooperative and comprehensive relationship with China that welcomes it to take on a responsible leadership role, the report said to support this, the "Joint Force" seeks a deeper military-to-military relationship with China to expand areas of mutual interest and benefit, improve understanding and reduce misperception.

    "We will promote common interests through China's cooperation in countering piracy and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and using its influence with North Korea to preserve stability on the Korean peninsula," it said.

    "We will continue to monitor carefully China's military developments and the implications those developments have on the military balance in the Taiwan Strait. We remain concerned about the extent and strategic intent of China's military modernisation, and its assertiveness in space, cyberspace, in the Yellow Sea, East China Sea, and South China Sea," it said.

    To safeguard America and partner nations' interests, the US will be prepared to demonstrate the will and commit the resources needed to oppose any nation's actions that jeopardise access to and use of the global commons and cyberspace, or that threaten the security of its allies, the report said.

    US seeks to expand military cooperation with India: Pentagon - World - DNA
     
  13. WARrior

    WARrior 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    u guyz must have understood by now that USA understand that India is the next big thing in yrs and decades to come and they cant stop it even if they want... its better to join hands rather. they have 2 options china and india and they know india is more comprehensive to deal with than china. ie. india can be a better frnd than china.

    also the biggest reason is demographics......india will be the biggest consumer in decades to come and thus the work resource for western countries will be fulfilled by india..in other words u will see south asian in large nos everywhere.....in USA, europe, SE asia, etc etc......

    this is our biggest strength.....and frankly i forsee india not being a superpower but definitely the international policy influence maker.....india will have the biggest say in international matters owing to its demographic spread.
     
  14. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. keen on high-tech defence ties with India

    Voicing “the U.S. support for India's expanding global reach,” a top American official has emphasised Washington's “preparedness now to share with India the most advanced technology” in the defence and economic domains.

    Speaking at a policy forum here, U.S. Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asian Affairs Geoffrey Pyatt suggested that New Delhi, for its part, “adopt a ‘Be East' policy … that expands India's market and security integration across the Asian region.”

    Tracing new trends in U.S. defence ties with India, as evident during President Barack Obama's recent visit to New Delhi, Mr. Pyatt noted New Delhi's “resolve to develop a military capacity that matches its expanding strategic horizons and increasing global interests.” So the U.S. was now “talking [to New Delhi] a lot” about the “two strong American competitors” for the Indian tender for 126 multi-role combat aircraft, worth about $11 billion.

    In prepared remarks for the speech, he had gone a step further in emphasising that “such a deal would [if it happens] revolutionise our [U.S.-India] military relationship.”

    The policy forum was organised by the local Institute of South Asian Studies (ISAS) in association with the U.S. Embassy and the Indian High Commission here, ahead of a planned business mission to India by the American Chamber of Commerce in Singapore.

    ISAS chairman Gopinath Pillai moderated the discussion on U.S. policy towards India.

    U.S. Ambassador to Singapore, David Adelman, will mentor the planned business mission to India.

    On a different but related front, Japan has recently emphasised its desire to deepen security ties with India.

    The Hindu : News / International : U.S. keen on high-tech defence ties with India
     
  15. Hashu

    Hashu Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    there is no dougt that india is the mosr pro-america country in the world, besides america itself!
     
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