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INDO-US Defence Cooperation

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by CONNAN, Jan 14, 2011.

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  1. Dilemma

    Dilemma Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: US urges India to sign CISMOA to access to defence technology

    The only time I see India signing CISMOA is with some changes made to it.
     
  2. MAFIAN GOD

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: US urges India to sign CISMOA to access to defence technology

    There is only one answer to this question and that a BIG NO......:nono::nono::nono:
     
  3. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: US urges India to sign CISMOA to access to defence technology

    You're joking right? US just gets to sit at the driver seat if India signs CISMOA. Why are they so concerned about interoperability even though we are not in any formal binding alliance with them? Because once they get that sign, it means that though we have good tech, we can also be pressed to do military missions for them through backdoor blackmail. Simple as that. Call me paranoid but technically speaking, if US is indeed happy with our non-proliferation record, then it has no need to worry about the transfer of its military tech to third parties and that too already old platforms that are juiced up variants.

    The whole point of CISMOA is to get another Pakistan in the subcontinent. Though not to that extent, but a considerable pressure can always be maintained through backchannel blackmail should that be needed.
     
  4. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    Re: US urges India to sign CISMOA to access to defence technology

    What are you referring to exactly when you say back-channel blackmail? Is this because of the reliance on the spare parts and further upgrades being threatened if not conducting some joint-operation?
     
  5. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: US urges India to sign CISMOA to access to defence technology

     
  6. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. Army and Indian military scientists focus on power, energy

    [​IMG]

    U.S. Army and Indian military scientists met March 9, to discuss improving power and energy sources at Belcamp, Md.

    Mar 10, 2011

    By Dan Lafontaine (Research, Development and Engineering Command Public Affairs)

    BELCAMP, Md. -- American and Indian military scientists discussed unburdening warfighters through improved power and energy technology March 9.

    Developing better power sources is vital for their militaries and countries in general, the speakers said.


    "We are trying to reduce the burden on the Soldiers. In Afghanistan, weight is one of the primary burdens. Weight comes in the context of food, fuel and Soldier protection," said Gary Martin, executive deputy to the commanding general, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

    "This is a focal point of the Army. Power and energy has become a major focus for small units and individual Soldiers," Martin said.


    R.S. Hastak echoed many of Martin's concerns during an overview of Indian research and development. He is the director of India's Naval Materials Research Laboratory.

    Hastak's scientists have recently worked on fuel cells, materials protection, marine environment control and development of specialty polymers and ceramics.


    Because of Base Realignment and Closure, Aberdeen Proving Ground is becoming the Army's hub for science and engineering, including improved power and energy sources.

    The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center is moving from Fort Monmouth to APG as part of BRAC. Eight CERDEC scientists who research power and energy attended the conference.

    CERDEC Director Jill Smith said American scientists should seek international partnerships.

    "Power is a very important area for us, for our Soldiers, and for the country in general. We have size, weight and power challenges in [the Department of Defense]," she said. "This is a very important collaboration. We can move further and faster than we could alone."

    Martin identified agreements with Canada, Israel and South Africa that have led to improvements on U.S. Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected vehicles.

    "We want to leverage the technologies that other countries have. We are very excited about this partnership," Martin said.

    The conference continues through March 11, with presentations from scientists in academia, defense contracting and the military.

    Army, Indian scientists focus on power, energy
     
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  7. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US, India draw closer as defense planners, army chiefs meet

    WASHINGTON: Top men leading India's fighting arm and its defense policy engaged with their American counterparts here this week as New Delhi and Washington drew closer in a strategic clinch while trying not to alarm China and Pakistan, which are seen by the democratic duo as posing complex challenges in the neighborhood and beyond.

    U.S and Indian officials were circumspect in describing low-key Defense Policy Group (DPG) meetings early in the week, an engagement that was closely followed by talks between the Indian Army Chief V K Singh and his U.S counterpart Gen. George Casey.

    In a statement that was largely anodyne but contained much between the lines, they spoke of an "extensive discussion on further strengthening bilateral defense ties, under the auspices of the Defence Framework Agreement of 2005," an informal but controversial Bush-era pact that promised unprecedented strategic partnership between Washington and New Delhi but had been sidelines in recent times.

    The DPG meeting, the statement said, included "a policy-level dialogue on the global strategic and security situation," which also discussed the "multilateral security architecture in Asia and looked forward to continued cooperation in these organizations," – diplomatese for common U.S and Indian concerns about the fluid situation in the Gulf and Arab world, the imbroglio, Pakistan's slide into anarchy, and China's muscle-flexing.

    The DPG meeting, the eleventh since U.S and India entered into an informal alliance -- more generally described as a partnership -- at the turn of the century, was co-chaired by India's Defense Secretary Pradeep Kumar and the U.S Under Secretary of Defence for Policy Michelle Flournoy. Kumar, accompanied by Ambassador Meera Shankar, also met Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs William Burns and Deputy Secretary of Defence William Lynn, as the two sides grappled with reaching common ground on a range of concerns in Asia and beyond.

    The policy meetings were followed up by day-long talks between Army Chiefs Singh and Casey over lunch and dinner between ceremonial events, deliberations which a Pentagon spokesman described as "thoughtful and productive." Both sides have noted repeatedly they hold more joint military exercises with each other than with any other country, a practice that is becoming even more frequent with the increasing acquisition of American military hardware by India.

    In fact, the DPG meeting, which is taking place under the overhang of tremendous U.S pressure on New Delhi to choose American fighter jets to augment its air force, referred to India's purchase of the C-130J heavylift aircraft, a deal that advances interoperability between the two sides. India recently deployed INS Jalashwa, an amphibious ship acquired from the U.S for evacuation of its national from Libya is a demonstration of its naval outreach, a capability which Washington is encouraging as part of its strategy to outsource some of its security concerns in the region stretching from the Gulf of Hormuz to Malacca Straits.

    Because an overt expression of such cooperation might alarm China and Pakistan, both Washington and New Delhi are keeping it low-key, even as policy makers on both sides struggle with internal political dynamics. The strategic community in both countries is divided about the emerging clinch, although more and more American pundits are starting to see India as the go-to power in Asia because of the perceived threat from China and the collapse of Pakistan.

    "India constitutes the logical hub for a new American alliance with Asian and Pacific nations to balance Beijing's growing military clout and to maintain stability in the region," analyst Steve Huntley, wrote in the Chicago Sun-Times on Friday. "Washington can't anticipate every foreign upheaval, but closer ties with India could prepare for what may be gathering storms on the other side of the world." Increasingly, many U.S commentators are expressing similar views.

    US, India draw closer as defense planners, army chiefs meet - The Times of India
     
  8. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US firm to ink ToT pact for Explosive Detection Kit(EDK) from DRDO

    The EDK, developed by the DRDO’s High Energy Materials Research Laboratory (HEMRL) in Pune, comes packed in a box the size of a vanity case which contains four reagents capable of detecting explosives even in trace quantities.

    It can be used to identify a range of explosives such as PETN, Black Powder, Dynamite, NC, NG, CE, Inorganic Mitrates, TNT, RDX and HMX based plastic explosives. The EDK kit can be easily carried to the spot and is found useful both before and after the blast. When the explosive substance is mixed with the different chemical reagents given in the kit, the drop turns into specific colour as given out in the instruction leaflet.

    Verification can normally follow using the Raman spectrometric test. Costing about Rs 5,000 a piece, the EDK is being commercially made by Noida-based Vantage Integrated Security Solutions Pvt Ltd under a Transfer of Technology pact with the DRDO. It is being widely used by the Bomb Detection and Disposal Squads of the Army, Paramilitary and state Police Forces in Jammu and Kashmir, Assam, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. The American firm is soon to enter into an MoU with the DRDO, which has patented its EDK.

    Tarmak007 -- A bold blog on Indian defence: US firm to ink ToT pact for Explosive Detection Kit, says DRDO
     
  9. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Hillary checks out Pranab, and the competition

    “To which industrial or business groups is [Pranab] Mukherjee beholden? Whom will he seek to help through his policies? What are Mukherjee's priorities in the upcoming budget... ?”

    “Why was Mukherjee chosen for the finance portfolio over Montek Singh Ahluwalia? How do Mukherjee and Ahluwalia get along?”

    These were among the questions U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton posed in a cable to the New Delhi Embassy in September 2009, a few months after Prime Minister Manmohan Singh settled in for a second term. The questions are focussed on India's “New Government Economic Leaders,” particularly on the Finance Minister. They seem to imply that Washington had been expecting either P. Chidambaram to return as Finance Minister or Montek Singh Ahluwalia to be elevated to that post.

    “How does Ahluwalia feel about remaining in this position? Which, if any, particular agenda items will he be pushing? Does he get on well with the prime minister?” Also, “What is Mukherjee's relationship with the Governor of the Reserve Bank of India, D.V. Subbarao? How does Subbarao view the removal of Chidambaram from the Minister of Finance slot? What impact has his removal had on relations between the finance ministry and the RBI?”

    The September 14, 2009 cable (225053: secret/noforn) asks: “What are Mukherjee's primary economic concerns and his views on Prime Minister Singh's economic reform Agenda? How quickly does he plan to 5-pursue these reforms? What is his ability to enact reforms?” The sharp Secretary of State also asks: “What are Mukherjee's views of the US bilateral economic relationship and where does he see the relationship Headed? What areas of cooperation is he eager to advance? How does he see the US-China economic relationship in comparison to the US-India relationship?”

    Washington analysts, writes Ms. Clinton to the New Delhi Embassy, “are closely monitoring the newly appointed economic leaders in the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) coalition government. We are interested in their views regarding future economic policy, opportunities for bilateral economic cooperation, and their ability to work together as a cohesive team. As time and resources permit, we would highly value any information on the following topics and questions, and plan to incorporate post reporting into finished analysis for policymakers.” The topics include the attitudes and likely directions of a few Ministers and top officials.

    “What policies are Mukherjee and other leaders considering to address the global financial crisis? What does Prime Minister Singh think about Mukherjee's new role as finance minister?”

    Ms. Clinton wants to get the measure of Minister for Commerce and Industry Anand Sharma. “Why was Sharma chosen for the job? What are his larger ambitions? Why was [Kamal] Nath moved to the road transport and highways portfolio? What are Nath's views on the change? Does Sharma get along with Mukherjee and Prime Minister Singh?” And also, “What is Sharma's relationship with Ahluwalia?”

    Other queries on Mr. Sharma: “What policies does Sharma plan to pursue? How does he view India's trade policies? What are his views on Prime Minister Singh's plans for gradual economic reform? What does he perceive as India's primary trade obstacles? What are Sharma's views on the World Trade Organization (WTO)? How will he approach initial meetings with his counterparts? What does he think of previous Minister of Commerce Kamal Nath's actions over the past five years? How close will Sharma remain to the NAMA-11? Is he willing to begin discussions with the US to advance WTO negotiations? How does Sharma view US-India economic relations?”

    “How does Sharma view India's current Foreign Direct Investment guidelines? Which sectors does he plan to open further? Why is he reluctant to open multi-brand retail? What are his views on the special economic zones?”

    The Hindu : News / The India Cables : Hillary checks out Pranab, and the competition
     
  10. Optimist

    Optimist Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indo-US and India-Russia: Strategic Partners All?

    India’s growing flirtations with the United States and its continuing romance with Russia no longer surprises anyone. Such is the cold logic of the 21st century global politics that wearing several hats comes easily to many countries including India. Both the US and Russia consider India to be their natural ally. In an address at the James Baker Institute for Public Policy on the eve of Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s visit to the US, Ambassador Meera Shankar described Indo-US ties as a “truly comprehensive partner-ship of mutual trust and confidence”. She further added: “I cannot think of a field of human endeavour where we are not breaking new grounds and re-defining the paradigm of our engagement.”

    The media hype about Prime Minister Manmohan Singh being President Obama’s first state guest at the White House was unprecedented, to say the least. If the American media covered the flair and panache of the first state dinner hosted by Obama for Singh, the Indian mediapersons were equally obsessed with the dinner menu, the guests’ list and the decorations as also the glittering gala provided by the First Lady. That the American press showed limited interest in the issues on the dialogue table spoke eloquently of the absence of substantive agreements between the two countries. Manmohan Singh almost returned empty-handed from Washington. And yet, for the Indian media, it was a mission accomplished!

    It is true that over the past few years, Indo-US relations have seen intensified political dialogue and there has also been a deepening of strategic understanding. In global forums like G-8 and G-20, India and the US have joined in debates on some of the most difficult and contentious issues with a degree of candour, and without rancour. Defence ties too have gathered fresh momentum. Nevertheless, the worldviews of the two countries are vastly different. The US is a status quo power, with a privileged position in the UN and international financial institutions. India, by contrast, is an aspiring great power. It may have kept the banner of democracy aloft in a neighbourhood surrounded by half-autocracies and failing states, but it has little influence in the region with its position being constantly challenged by China and Pakistan. India has done well to spurn the US props to engage in “democracy promotion” which is often seen as a cover for regime change.

    Indo-US alliance, if it can at all be described so, can at best be compared to a love affair where jealousy is greater than love. India seems to enjoy American flirtations, but feels embarrassed by the fat boy going to town making protestations of love. The current convergence of broad strategic interests between India and the US on Afghanistan, terrorism and other regional and global issues may not be long lasting. Indo-US ties are a coalition of the unwilling.

    The US claims to be a strategic ally of India but Obama did not bat an eyelid while asking President Hu Jintao of China to join hands with him in managing tensions in South Asia, a move which may have surprised Beijing. Ambassador Timothy Roemer went to town assuring Indians that the Obama Administration will work “shoulder-to-shoulder, hand-in-hand and hour-by-hour” to cooperate on combating terror. He also said on the eve of Singh’s visit to the US that the two leaders would be unveiling a new strategic relationship with global overtones.

    Yet, for all practical purposes, on Afghanistan, the Obama Administration has downgraded India into a sub-regional power. As The Indian Express editorial rightly said: Obama “has tended to use Pakistan as the fulcrum of South Asia, and sees India as one knotty strand in the Afghanistan tangle”. Some of Obama’s close advisers still maintain that the US cannot win the war in Afghanistan unless a solution to the Kashmir problem is reached and that the problem of a failing state in Pakistan cannot be adequately addressed unless New Delhi and Islamabad are nudged towards reconciliation.

    The Indo-US nuclear deal promised to transform a “significant bilateral irritant into a real strategic opportunity” and the Obama Administration continues to maintain that it is “fully committed to the civil nuclear partnership”. But it was this very Administration that got the G-8 to endorse a proposed Nuclear Suppliers Group ban on the sale of enrichment and reprocessing technology to India. The US demand for intrusive access to the reprocessing facilities India will be building seems to come in the way of an agreement for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel with the US. On NPT, India is feeling the heat from the Obama Administration. One such indication came recently when Hillary Clinton said, while delivering the Dean Acheson Memorial lecture, that her Administration was working with India to come up with a 21st century version of the NPT. What that version is, nobody knows.

    ¨

    Where does one place Indo-Russian relations? To say that the two countries are time-tested friends has become clichéd. Given the unique geopolitical position that Russia occupies, Moscow is critical to India’s overall military and energy security and its quest for great power status. The pomp and splendour of Washington was missing in Moscow when Prime Minister visited Russia. But Singh discovered in the Russian capital how “the road to a friend’s house is never long”, as a Danish proverb puts it.

    In contrast with Washington, Russia accepts India’s pre-eminence in the region. It does not interfere in India’s relationship with its neighbours, much less it makes China responsible for keeping peace in South Asia. The invitation to China to meddle in India’s backyard is by no means a friendly act by Washington. Moscow has no record of doing anything that can create problems for India with its neighbours.

    Prime Minister’s visit to Russia saw the two countries sign as many as six agreements, the most important being a civilian nuclear energy agreement under which Russia will set up more nuclear reactors in India, transfer the entire range of nuclear energy technologies and supply nuclear fuel even after the deal is called off. This deal is far better than the much-hyped one with the US. Russians have also promised India enrichment and reprocessing rights.

    In the Indian scheme of things, Russia will remain a crucial ally. There are compelling reasons why India will require to forge even closer ties with Moscow. The first and foremost is Russia’s underlying strength. The exceptional endowment of natural resources, including strategic ones, scientific knowledge, military capability, particularly in the strategic weapons domain, make it a natural world power. To these is added its unique geographical position as a Eurasian power which makes it possible to influence multiple theatres of action.

    It would be simplistic to explain India’s traditional special ties with the former Soviet Union merely through the prism of East-West confrontation. These were based primarily on a broad range of convergence of interests. An important element that has gained salience in recent years is Russia’s rise as the world’s first energy superpower. A country which is the world’s largest gas producer and the second largest oil producer is bound to matter to India for its energy security interests.

    Analysts in the US may argue that the US is cultivating democratic India as a natural counterweight to a rising China, but the Obama Administration should know that India will not play such a surrogate role. Given the geopolitical realities of Asia and the phenomenal rise of China at its epicentre, India will require to build even stronger strategic relationship with Russia both for purposes of strategic insurance and greater stability of the region. This is not to say, India will not need to cultivate the US or China.

    All said, the contrast between Indo-US ties and India-Russian relations is there for all to see. Technology denial, sanctions and arm-twisting continue to haunt India as far as the US is concerned. Russia, on the other hand, has been keen to walk an extra mile to accommodate India’s requirements. But Russia too is changing. Energy and defence are the lynchpin of Indo-Russian ties. But there is no big political idea that now binds India and Russia together. Economic ties are a vital part for any two countries. This is where a lot of attention is required.

    Indo-US and India-Russia: Strategic Partners All? - Mainstream Weekly
     
  11. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    India & US must further strengthen ties

    On a visit to India as part of a bi-partisan Congressional delegation, a US Senator has said that India is a natural ally of the United States and the two countries need to further strengthen their relationship.

    “As a dynamic democracy in the heart of Asia, India is a natural ally of the United States,†Senator John Hoeven said in a statement.

    The Congressional delegation is being led by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

    “It makes sense for both the United States and North Dakota to maintain a dialogue and expand commercial relations with India. This enormous nation is emerging as a great economic power, and it’s in our interest to work together for our mutual benefit,†said the Senator from North Dakota.

    The Congressional delegation met the Defence Minister, Mr A.K. Antony, the National Security Advisor, Mr Shivshankar Menon, and other high-ranking Indian security officials.

    The Senator said that the two countries are the world’s largest democracies, with representative governments and commitments to basic civil liberties.

    India is also strategically situated in Central Asia and borders both Pakistan and China. The United States and India share a common interest in a stable and peaceful Asia and the free flow of commerce and resources in that part of the world, he said.

    India is already engaged in the Afghan mission, contributing $1.5 billion in aid to help Afghanistan build infrastructure.

    Mr Hoeven and the Indian security officials discussed ways to further work together in Afghanistan, as well as ways to address the growing level of Islamic extremism and terrorism in Pakistan.

    According to him, the United States and India now conduct joint military exercises, and there is more the two countries can do together to build a strategic relationship. “With 1.2 billion people, India is the second most populous nation in the world,†he said.

    “With an average economic growth rate of about 9 per cent, the country’s growing consumer base represents an enormous market for American and North Dakotan goods and services. Creating a better environment for mutual trade could generate real business opportunities and jobs for American workers,†he said.

    Mr Hoeven discussed ways to enhance trade ties between North Dakota and India with the Union Home Minister, Mr P. Chidambaram, and the Minister of Commerce and Industry, Mr Anand Sharma, as well as a group of high-level Indian business leaders.

    They spoke at a meeting hosted by the Confederation of Indian Industry, an organisation similar to the US Chamber of Commerce, which works to promote India’s economic development.

    The Senator proposed organising a trade delegation between CII and the North Dakota Trade Office to partner North Dakota and Indian companies.

    Business Line : Industry & Economy / Economy : ‘India, US must further strengthen ties’
     
  12. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US nuclear submarine docks in Goa

    At a time when India continues to resist US overtures for an agreement that would allow American warships access to Indian ports and services, a US Navy nuclear submarine has docked in Goa.

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    The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS La Jolla (SSN 701) moors alongside the submarine tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39). La Jolla is in Goa, India for a port visit.
    Headlines Today has exclusive pictures of US Navy nuclear submarine USS La Jolla which docked in Goa two days ago.

    This is the first time that a US nuclear submarine has docked in India. The submarine is in Goa as part of a goodwill initiative in the region.

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    Sailors aboard the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS La Jolla (SSN 701) handle lines as the boat moors alongside the submarine tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39).

    The submarine will undergo minor repairs and maintenance at the Mormugao port. The La Jolla is a Los Angeles-class nuclear-powered fast attack submarine carrying Tomahawk cruise missiles, Harpoon anti-ship missiles, torpedoes and mines.

    Berthing of US ships and submarines has been the subject of great controversy in the last few years, highlighted during the visit of the American nuclear-powered supercarrier USS Nimitz in 2007.

    US nuclear submarine docks in Goa : North: India Today
     
  13. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    India's growth offers huge opportunities: US

    With 80 percent of India of 2030 yet to be built, there are huge business opportunities for American and Indian companies in varied areas, including defence, according to a top US official.

    Despite some of the shortcomings like corruption and infrastructure, the tremendous growth that is taking place now in India present some quite significant opportunities, US Assistant Secretary of State for South Asia, Robert Blake said in an interview with Knowledge@Wharton in Philadelphia last week.

    As he pointed out at the Wharton India Economic Forum as "80 percent of the India of 2030 is yet to be built, so there are going to be vast opportunities in areas such as the development of airports, regional airports, of railway networks, of fiberoptic networks," he said

    Things are now possible in sensitive areas like defence also, Blake said noting that as India's Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) has come off the IS Department of Commerce's entities list, "for the first time we're going to be able to work with them."

    "So there are tremendous sort of synergies that can be exploited from that," Blake said adding, "I think when you add in the private sector, which is already very well developed both in India and the United States , the synergies are magnified."

    As American companies compete and hopefully win big contracts like the medium multi-role combat aircraft contract, he said, "there will be many many opportunities for them to start to invest" to meet quite significant offset requirements.

    "And I think there will be some quite interesting co-development and co-production opportunities that will result from those," Blake said.

    Asked about some of the risks that could undermine the opportunities, he said: "one of the principal risks that a lot of people worry about is simply that the momentum that has been established now in our relations will not be sustained."

    Referring to "political divisions that exist, particularly in the Indian parliament" Blake said: "I think that the vast attention that has been given to the corruption controversy has really crowded out a lot of the opportunities that could have taken place."

    "So I think both of our countries need to just keep our eye on the ball and remind our leaders of the importance of this relationship and to continue to make progress."

    Noting "now the private sector has eclipsed what the government is doing, and that's a good thing," he said: That's exactly what we'd like to see happen."

    India's growth offers huge opportunities: US - The Economic Times
     
  14. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    CCS likely to clear biggest Indo-US defence deal by month-end:


    EKMULAKATNEWS


    New Delhi: The biggest Indo-US defence deal worth USD 4.1 billion is expected to be cleared by the Cabinet Committee on Security by the end of this month. "The CCS will take up the deal for procuring 10 C-17 heavy-lift transport aircraft for discussion in its next meeting in March and is expecte

    to clear it," Defence Ministry sources told PTI here. The Defence Ministry has already approved funds for procuring the aircraft in this fiscal, they added. India is planning to procure the aircraft for augmenting its fleet of Ilyushin-76 aircraft and Antonov-32 transport aircraft from the US through the Foreign Military Sales route. The negotiations between India and the US for the deal were completed in February this year. After finalising the initial deal for ten aircraft, the IAF is also planning to place orders for additional six aircraft. On the recent Defence Min

    the US through the Foreign Military Sales route. The negotiations between India and the US for the deal were completed in February this year. After finalising the initial deal for ten aircraft, the IAF is also planning to place orders for additional six aircraft. On the recent Defence Ministry projects cleared by the CCS, the sources said the proposal to induct at least 16 of the indigenous Akash surface-to-air missile systems into the Army and Project Sanjay related to military communication for the Army were cleared by the highest decision-making body for security-related matters in the government. The Akash Missile systems are produced by the Bharat Dynamics Limited and have been developed by the DRDO. The IAF has already placed orders for 64 of these missiles and inducted two of them.

    istry projects cleared by the CCS, the sources said the proposal to induct at least 16 of the indigenous Akash surface-to-air missile systems into the Army and Project Sanjay related to military communication for the Army were cleared by the highest decision-making body for security-related matters in the government. The Akash Missile systems are produced by the Bharat Dynamics Limited and have been developed by the DRDO. The IAF has already placed orders for 64 of these missiles and inducted two of them.

    in the government. The Akash Missile systems are produced by the Bharat Dynamics Limited and have been developed by the DRDO. The IAF has already placed orders for 64 of these missiles and inducted two of them.
     
  15. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. eyes India arms deals beyond fighter setback

    India's choice of European warplanes in an $11 billion competition to update its combat fleet was a setback for U.S. aerospace companies, but it is not game over for the Americans.

    U.S. arms makers are still jockeying for billions of dollars in sales to India, which plans to modernize its old, Soviet-era military equipment and technology.

    Joel Johnson, an international aerospace trade expert, said India may have opted for a European fighter because of a history of U.S. sanctions tied to its nuclear program and because of technology transfer constraints.

    "U.S. contractors may get defeated by politics, but not by quality," he said. "India is likely to turn to the U.S. again for unique know-how and products."

    U.S. contractors are increasingly pinning their hopes on overseas markets for revenue growth to help offset a projected slowing of Pentagon demand due to U.S. fiscal belt-tightening.

    Eliminated from the multi-role fighter race were Chicago-based Boeing Co's F/A-18 SuperHornet and Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed Martin Corp's F-16.

    They had been vying with European and Russian rivals to supply 126 fighters to India. A deal would have capped closer ties between the U.S. and Indian militaries.

    The decision shuts U.S. companies out of one of the decade's most hotly pursued arms deals, even as Washington expands strategic ties with India, partly as a hedge against China's growing military clout.

    Richard Aboulafia of the Teal Group aerospace consultancy said a U.S. win in the Indian fighter competition "would have been the linchpin of a strategic, military and economic relationship that would have benefited a lot of U.S. companies."

    He said losing the contract was more of a strategic and political blow to the United States than an industrial one.

    It was unclear why the Indian government short-listed the Eurofighter made by Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain, and France's Rafale for the $11 billion contract. Boeing said in a statement it was requesting a "debrief" from the Indian Air Force and would then decide on "possible options."

    Some analysts such as Bryron Callan of Capital Alpha Partners theorized the U.S. government had been unwilling to transfer as much sensitive electronic warfare and radar technology as India had hoped. If so, this would not be as relevant in deals that do not involve fighter planes.

    A person from the U.S. industry with first-hand knowledge of Indian weapons purchases said big Indian arms programs of this type had a history of unraveling and going back to square one.

    "I wouldn't be surprised if this one were reopened for further evaluation," he said.

    The U.S. companies are hoping for explanations that will let them better understand Indian processes and procedures with an eye to future competitions.


    INDIA SEEN AS LONG-TERM INVESTMENT

    The United States is widely seen as having the technological edge to win Indian military contracts. About $50 billion worth are expected to be up for grabs in the next five years.

    In the past three years, India agreed to buy some $10 billion in U.S. military hardware, including six Lockheed C-130J military transport aircraft and eight long-range Boeing P-8 maritime reconnaissance and anti-submarine warfare aircraft.

    Lockheed and Boeing, the Pentagon's top suppliers, campaigned aggressively for the fighter order and vowed on Thursday to keep chasing the Indian market.

    Boeing said it looked at India as "a long-term investment and a long-term partnership well beyond the fighter competition."

    The company is offering its Apache and Chinook rotorcraft in competitions to supply India 22 attack and 15 heavy lift helicopters among other opportunities it is pursuing, said Damien Mills, a spokesman for Boeing's military aircraft unit.

    Lockheed said it was in talks with India about supplying another six C-130Js, in addition to the first six that began to be delivered in February.

    The company also has has several unspecified products beyond its F-16 fighter "suitable for India's security needs," John Giese, a Lockheed spokesman, said in an email.

    (Reporting by Jim Wolf; editing by David Gregorio and Andre Grenon

    U.S. eyes India arms deals beyond fighter setback | Reuters
     
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