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INDO-US Defence Cooperation

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by CONNAN, Jan 14, 2011.

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  1. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US lauds India`s role in Afghanistan

    Washington: US on Thursday appreciated India's broad-based developmental work in Afghanistan, but said Chinese interest in the war-torn country is likely to deepen, particularly if the security situation continues to improve.

    In a report to the Congress as mandated under the National Defence Authorisation Act 2008, the US Defence Department listed the projects being implemented by India and lauded its efforts in rebuilding Afghanistan.

    "India remains committed to diplomatic and development efforts in Afghanistan," the Pentagon said, adding that the Indian efforts are being "viewed favourably" by Afghans.

    While lauding India's role, the report says though China has helped train Afghan security personnel, there is no indication that it is "willing to increase the level of assistance provided to the country."

    "Beijing's interest in Afghanistan is likely to deepen, particularly if the security situation continues to improve," the report said.

    India continues to be one of Afghanistan's largest assistance donors, providing USD 1.3 billion for major infrastructure projects such as electricity generation and transmission, road construction, and the construction of the Afghan parliament building in Kabul.

    India is largely responsible for bringing more consistent electricity to Kabul, it said.

    Work on the Salma hydroelectric dam in Herat Province continues with funding from India, with a planned completion date of September 2011, the report noted, adding that India provides a variety of smaller-scale projects and initiatives, like the Indian Medical Missions in Afghanistan's major cities that serve tens of thousands of Afghans yearly.

    "Such projects provide critical social services and build goodwill among the Afghan people. India also focuses its assistance on building Afghan human capital through scholarship programs in India (more than 1000 per year), agriculture training programs, and other vocational training activities," the report said.

    Public opinion surveys show that Afghans view India's involvement in their country favorably, the report said.

    Unlike India, China, the report says, China has just two primary concerns -- security and trade.

    Since 2002, China donated a total of USD 130 million in aid to Afghan Government. In 2009, China announced it would provide an additional USD 75 million over the next five years.

    Chinese companies are investing in Afghanistan, but progress is slow on the largest project, the Aynak copper mine in Logar Province, it said.

    The deal, signed in May 2008, also includes construction of a 400-megawatt coal-fired power plant, a freight railway running through Tajikistan to Afghanistan, a hospital, and a mosque.

    However, security, archaeological, customs, and other concerns have stalled progress on these projects and have put a damper on other investments.

    "China is concerned about the security situation in Afghanistan, narcotics trafficking, and the safety of Chinese workers in the country. Although China has helped train Afghan security personnel, there is no indication that it is willing to increase the level of assistance provided to Afghanistan," the report said.

    US lauds India`s role in Afghanistan
     
  2. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US, Indian defence militaries getting closer: Roemer

    New Delhi : Despite setbacks for US firms Lockheed-Martin and Boeing that were Wednesday eased out of India's shortlist for a $10.4-billion deal for 126 fighter jets, the country's ambassador here Timothy J. Roemer remains upbeat on defence ties.

    "On defence, one simply has to look at the growth in defence sales to see how close our two armed forces are becoming," Roemer told a meeting with AmCham here, a day after he said he was quitting as ambassador to India from June.

    "But do not take my word for it," the ambassador said and quoted from an interview given recently to IANS by Boeing's Christopher M. Chadwick, before the Indian government said their F-18 medium multi-role combat aircraft was no longer in the fray.

    "Our hands are pretty full. There's lots going on," Chadwick, the president of Boeing Military Aircraft, had said in the interview.

    Roemer touched upon the delivery of the first of the six C130-J planes in February and many more since then and said they demonstrate the best of American manufacturing, technology, and workmanship, delivered on time and within budget.

    "We are expecting similar success with the sale of C17 aircraft. Once this over four billion dollar sale is finalized, the economic impact will be felt by 30,000 American workers and 650 American suppliers located in 44 states," he said.

    Roemer said the near-two-years he has spent in India has been an extraordinarily successful and rewarding time that also saw some major accomplishments in US-India strategic relationship.

    "Before the rumours begin to fly, let me say unequivocally: I am not departing to run for President! When I accepted the position, I told President (Barack) Obama I would agree to stay for two years but after that my commitment to my family would take precedence."

    Going forward, the ambassador saw three important global trends that will set the tone and pace of the US-India global partnership:

    -A shift in the geo-political space with emphasis moving away from the Atlantic to the Pacific where India was set to become the third largest economy after US and China.

    -A large Indian population moving out of poverty and the predicted growth of its middle class from an estimated 160 million people to 300 million or even 500 million.

    -Challenges posed by transnational actions in areas such as clean energy, technology and even social media that played a role in over-throwing a 30-year government in Egypt.

    "We are entering a golden age in our relations that will result in us creating economic opportunities for our citizens, educating the leaders of tomorrow and ensuring safe and secure communities throughout the world."

    US, Indian defence militaries getting closer: Roemer | TwoCircles.net
     
  3. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. to continue defence ties with India: Pentagon

    [​IMG]

    The Pentagon on Friday said it is “deeply disappointed” over two U.S. companies losing India’s multi- billion dollar combat fighter deal, but made it clear that the bilateral defence ties would not be affected.

    In a separate development, without referring to the Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft deal, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said President Barack Obama views India-U.S. ties as an anchor to America’s approach in Asia.

    Mr. Carney said the U.S. is committed to deepening its relationship with India and would continue to pursue top priorities with the country.

    “President Obama has great respect for the Indian people, a close partnership with Prime Minister (Manmohan) Singh, and views this relationship as an anchor to our approach in Asia and the promise of the 21st century,” he told PTI.

    The Pentagon said the U.S. remains convinced that it offers its defence partners the world’s most advanced and reliable technology.

    Pentagon spokesman Col. Dave Lapan said the Defence Department was “deeply disappointed” at India’s decision to exclude American companies from the purchase order.

    “We are deeply disappointed by this news but we look forward to continuing to grow and develop our defence partnership with India and remain convinced that the United States offers our defence partners around the globe the world’s most advanced and reliable technology,” he said.

    Mr. Carney said the United States is committed to deepening its cooperation, and partnering on a bilateral, regional, and global level to address the major challenges of the coming decades together.

    “We will continue to pursue top priorities with India, such as balanced economic growth, counter-terrorism, global security and stability, education, agriculture, trade and investment, and the advance of democratic values,” he said.

    “Our commitment to addressing these challenges together demonstrates the growing strength and purpose of our strategic partnership,” the White House spokesman said.

    The Hindu : News / National : U.S. to continue defence ties with India: Pentagon
     
  4. CONNAN

    CONNAN Major ELITE MEMBER

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    US 'feared snags in India weapons sale'

    WASHINGTON: The US has fretted for years that its ties to Pakistan and past sanctions against India would harm its efforts to win arms deals such as the $11 billion (BD4bn) fighter order that slipped away from two US suppliers this week, a US diplomatic cable showed yesterday.

    "Our ability to seize the opportunities presented by this newly improved environment is limited by the commonly held view that the US will not prove to be a reliable supplier of defence equipment," Timothy Roemer, the US ambassador to India, said in an October 29, 2009, cable to Michele Flournoy, a top Pentagon official then about to visit India.

    US officials from President Barack Obama down subsequently pushed hard to sell US fighter jets to India to crown expanding security ties.

    The US also is eyeing tens of billions of dollars in other potential arms deals with India, the cable showed.

    In the end, India shortlisted two European aircraft over Boeing's F/A-18 SuperHornet and Lockheed Martin's F-16, company officials said.

    Lockheed and Boeing are the Pentagon's No 1 and No 2 supplier, respectively.

    Each is pressing to boost sales in India, which plans to spend about $50 billion (BD19bn) in the next five years to modernise old Soviet-era weapons and technology.

    Roemer announced last Thursday he was leaving his post for professional and family reasons.

    "The new environment" reference in his 2009 cable concerned the emergence of Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's government with "a clear mandate not beholden to coalition partners" for the first time since post-Cold War US-Indian strategic ties took shape.

    US competitors use the economic sanctions imposed by Washington after Indian nuclear tests in 1998 to try to harm US sales prospects, the cable said.

    They also point to "our close defence relationship with Pakistan as rationale that the US should not be trusted," Roemer wrote in the message obtained by the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks and made available by a third party.

    Gulf Daily News » World News » US 'feared snags in India weapons sale'
     
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  5. SpArK

    SpArK SorCeroR Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    US to invest in Indian infra, defence and education sectors



    New Delhi: US companies are looking at investing in sectors like energy, education, communications and infrastructure in India, thererby further deepening economic ties between the two countries.

    "We are looking for markets (in India), partners so that we can have a win-win kind of relationship between India and US," an adviser to US Senator Jeanne Shaheen said here.

    Chad Kreikemeier, who is leading a 13-member trade mission to India, said the two nations "have got to widen their range from energy, education, infrastructure to defence market".

    The delegation comprises eight firms and educational institutions, including representatives from the Dartmouth College from New Hampshire.

    "We sat down with senior officials from DRDO, Ministry of New and Renewable Energy and Ministry of HRD to hear their views on the ways to increase trade relations, seeking advice..." Kreikemeier, who is a trade and foreign policy adviser to Shaheen, said.

    He was speaking at a business meeting organised by Indo-American Chamber of Commerce.

    He said the US finds enough potential in India as it is an "absolute market" and would expand its infrastructure in next five years.

    On increasing commodity specific exports from New Hampshire, he said India is the 28th largest market for goods -- ranging from hi-tech products, computers, circuits to education -- from the state.

    The delegation is also wooing Indian students to study in New Hampshire universities, he said.

    New Hampshire, located in north-eastern US, is home to many industries in sectors like electronic and medical products besides travel and tourism.


    US to invest in Indian infra, defence and education sectors
     
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  6. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    US-India military exercises have grown dramatically: Pentagon

    Washington: Commensurate with the growing Indo-US military-to-military ties, joint exercises between the two forces too have grown dramatically, with as many as 56 cooperative events in 2011, more than India has conducted with any other country, a Pentagon report has said.

    In a rare report on India submitted to the Congress, the Department of Defense lists all major exercises currently on between the two militaries and says these exercises are important vehicles in developing professional relationship and familiarity between different wings of the militaries.

    "US-India military exercises have grown dramatically in size, scope and sophistication. We now have regular exercises across all services that help to deepen our military and defence relationships," the Pentagon said in its report.

    In 2011, there were 56 cooperative events across all Services – more than India conducted with any other country, the report informed the Congress.

    In 2010, the US Pacific Command (USPACOM) and the Indian Integrated Defence Staff (IDS) conducted the inaugural Joint Exercise India (JEI) tabletop exercise in Alaska which is a significant step in the evolution of the exercise programme because it facilitates multiservice and bilateral cooperation. It said JEI may include a command post exercise in 2012.

    Noting that Naval cooperation between the two countries helped to lay the groundwork for cooperation to evolve in complexity, the report said the two navies conduct four exercises annually: MALABAR, HABU NAG (naval aspects of amphibious operations), SPITTING COBRA (explosive ordnance destruction focus), and SALVEX (diving and salvage).

    MALABAR, which has been a multinational exercise, is the premier annual bilateral maritime exercise conducted to reinforce maritime tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) of both nations.

    HABU NAG is also increasing in scale and complexity, and was conducted this year in conjunction with USPACOM's JEI to leverage the complementary characteristics of amphibious and HA/DR operations, it said.

    These exercises are important vehicles in developing professional relationships and familiarity between the two navies and run the gamut of high-end naval warfare, including integrated air/missile defence, anti-surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, and naval special warfare.

    "In addition to the annual Pacific Fleet-Indian Navy Executive Steering Group meeting, we also hold regular naval bilateral staff talks, engage in port visits, and conduct personnel exchanges at all ranks," it said, adding that the US Coast Guard had also recently begun engagement and training with the Indian Coast Guard.

    The US army's engagement with India centres on the annual YUDH ABHYAS exercise that commenced in 2004, it said, pointing out that this was the first year the two conventional armies exercised together in India since 1962.

    YUDH ABHYAS has expanded from a company-size field training exercise to battalion live fire exercises and brigade-level command post exercises.

    "In addition to the Executive Steering Group meeting convened annually between our armies, there have also been numerous subject matter expert exchanges on challenges of mutual concern, including countering improvised explosive devices," the report said.

    Although India does not have a direct counterpart to the US Marine Corps, the Indian Army desires engagement with the US Marine Corps to develop the capabilities of its amphibious units, the Pentagon said.

    In this light exercise SHATRUJEET, that has since 2010 focused on amphibious doctrine and operations, is an annual, reciprocal, company-sized, ground field training exercise that could easily be expanded in size and scope.

    Besides, COPE INDIA, meant to be held bi-annually, is the primary exercise between the two air forces, the last of which was held in Agra, in October 2009, focused on mobility operations in a humanitarian assistance scenario.

    The report said that the IAF also intends to participate in RED FLAGNELLIS in 2013, likely with both fighters and airborne warning and control system aircraft.

    RED FLAG is a joint, combined training exercise that provides a peacetime "battlefield" to train interoperability across a variety of mission sets, including interdiction, air superiority, defence suppression, airlift, aerial refueling, and reconnaissance.

    "The course of air force engagement is charted annually at the Pacific Air Forces (PACAF)-IAF Executive Steering Group, and several subject matter expert exchanges and exchanges are conducted annually on topics such as airfield engineering, intelligence, weapons and tactics, and flight safety," the report said.

    US Special Operations Forces (SOF), Pentagon said, interacts with Indian SOF through Joint Combined Exchange Training (JCET) events, incorporated as part of Service- sponsored exercises MALABAR, YUDH ABHYAS, and COPE INDIA.

    Another SOF exclusive exercise is VARJA PRAHAR which focuses on advanced rifle marksmanship, combat marksmanship, close-quarters combat, helicopter insertion, medical evacuation, combined mission planning, and scenario- based missions, it said.

    Manorama Online | US-India military exercises have grown dramatically: Pentagon
     
  7. Nick 779

    Nick 779 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Raytheon keen to supply missiles to IAF
    Published November 11, 2011

    SOURCE: THE HINDU
    [​IMG]


    Raytheon, the Massachusetts-headquartered Defence and security systems supplier, feels that a number of its missiles can be fitted on the aircraft that the Indian Air Force plans to buy as part of its modernisation programme.

    “Just last week we got an RFI (Request for Interest – the first stage of the bidding process) from the IAF for a HEAT (High Speed Expendable Aerial Target) missile,†said Mr Jeff White, Senior Programme Manager – Air Warfare Systems Business Development, Raytheon Missile Systems.

    Submits Request for Interest

    “Last night, I sent a letter of interest,†he told a group of Indian journalists on a visit to some of Raytheon’s facilities in the US at the invitation of the company, at Tucson on Thursday.

    The RFI had asked for the price for a single unit as well as for multiples of 100, Mr White, a former US Marine Corps pilot, said. “We are pretty excited about the RFI,†he added.

    Long-term ties

    He and other Raytheon executives who interacted with the journalists over the last four days reiterated that the US company was interested in a long-term relationship with India, both for supplying missiles and for tying up with Indian companies that would manufacture either the systems or components for the missiles.

    Technology transfer

    Raytheon was in talks with a number of Indian companies, they said, but declined to name them. Over time, Raytheon was open to the idea of transferring technology to the Indian companies and to manufacturing in India, as a means to cut costs.

    The Indian Air Force is evaluating the options for its MMRCA (Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft) programme. Raytheon feels that its missiles such as JSOW (Joint Standoff Weapon), Maverick, AMRAAM (Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile) and AIM-9X are capable of being integrated with any type of aircraft that the IAF may select for the programme. The Eurofighter and Rafale are the two in the race for the $10 billion MMRCA to supply about 125 aircraft.

    According to Raytheon officials, the IAF has also issued two RFIs for Intelligence Surveillance Targeting and Reconnaissance radars. Raytheon officials have met IAF officials several times and discussed what the company could offer.
     
  8. Nick 779

    Nick 779 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Javelin missile, R&D coop to feature in US-India talks
    Published April 16, 2012 | By admin

    SOURCE: AJAY SHUKLA / BUSINESS-STANDARD

    [​IMG]

    As New Delhi looks to translate its relationship with the US into badly needed high technology, the government is readying for meetings tomorrow with America’s key gatekeeper of military technology, the visiting assistant secretary of state for political military affairs, Andrew Shapiro.High on New Delhi’s technology agenda is Washington’s reluctance to transfer military knowhow, of the kind needed for building the FGM-148 Javelin anti-tank missile in India. The Army wants the Javelin for its ground forces, to enable two-man infantry teams to fire $40,000 missiles at $10 million enemy tanks 2,500 metres away and destroy them 95 per cent of the time. The Javelin sale, potentially a billion-dollar (Rs 5,000 crore) contract for US companies, Raytheon and Lockheed Martin, has been blocked by Shapiro’s office, the department of political military affairs. The technology, it has been deemed, is too sensitive to transfer.

    Shapiro’s 10-person team will be discussing this issue with India’s defence and foreign ministries (MoD and MEA), which regard overly-strict US licensing and export controls as key obstacles in “operationalising”, or obtaining tangible benefits from the growing strategic convergence between the US and India.



    In clearing any transfer of high technology like the Javelin, Shapiro’s primary consideration is strategic: would technologically enabling India enhance long-term US strategic interests, without threatening America’s lead in military technology. Growing pressure from American senators and representatives complicates Shapiro’s decision-making. Fearing the declining US defence budget will cause job losses in their constituencies, American legislators are willing to back technology transfer to India, if that is what it takes to get orders from the world’s biggest buyer of foreign weaponry.

    A likely example of this is the Global Hawk Block 30, a high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), which flies 36-hour unmanned missions to watch over vast expanses of territory or water. After the latest US defence budget cuts, the US Air Force has cancelled orders for Global Hawks, 13 of which have already been built or are close to completion by Northrop Grumman. The politically influential company, aided by US Congressmen in whose constituencies the UAV is built, are pressuring the US government to find alternative buyers. There are 13 Block 30 Global Hawks almost ready, which will now be mothballed.

    Savvy bargaining by India could get it the Block 30 Global Hawk and perhaps even the technologies that go into it, believes Manohar Thyagaraj, an expert on US-India military relations.

    “If India were to express interest, US Congressmen would mount pressure on Shapiro to share the technology. But India tends to engage only the US administration; it has put very little effort into building relationships on Capitol Hill. When Congress gets onto something, it acquires real momentum. New Delhi has not yet understood that engaging Congress is as important as engaging the administration,” says Thyagaraj.

    India’s key technology player, the Defence R&D Organisation (DRDO), has figured out the opportunity that lies in declining Western defence budgets. DRDO chief V K Saraswat declared during the Defexpo India 2012 defence exhibition on March 31, “Global economic recession is leading to capacities and capabilities in the international market that we can exploit. So, it will be an era of US and European agencies coming and trying to work with us and we will exploit this.”

    Shapiro’s department of political military relations must okay all such joint ventures. US defence giant Raytheon is learnt to be keen on working with DRDO for developing technologies that can detect improvised explosive devices (IEDs), the roadside bombs that took a heavy toll of US lives in Iraq and Afghanistan, and that are now being used to deadly effect by Maoist insurgents in India. With US government funding, Raytheon has already developed a technology called SAVI (Seismic Accoustic Vibration Imaging), which uses acoustic reflections to detect buried IEDs. But budgetary cuts have dried up Raytheon’s funding, and it is looking towards India for partnership in developing SAVI into a deployable military system.

    “The DRDO’s funding and scientific base is ideal for reviving such a project; and both sides would profit from selling the SAVI system to the Indian military and abroad. If India comes to the table with money, it would be well placed to negotiate access,” says a top DRDO official.

    The dialogue on Monday will be followed by a succession of others. The US-India-Japan trilateral is scheduled for April 22 in Tokyo, followed by the US-India Strategic Dialogue in Washington in May and the US-India Homeland Security dialogue in June.
     
  9. Jack47

    Jack47 REGISTERED

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    But for some reason US is still supplying Pak with weapons which is becoming a real pain in the ass for the indian force!
     
  10. aijazali

    aijazali REGISTERED

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    India has better relations with Russian as compair to USA
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    India’s DRDO Rethinking the Way it Does Business
    May 13, 2010 14:36 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff

    Latest update [?]

    Government decisions will restructure DRDO. But will they reform it?

    Keep reading for the whole story with recent events put in context

    In “India’s Defense Market: Obstacles to Modernization” DID looked at the various organizational pathologies that were creating repeated failures for Indian defense procurement efforts, to the point that billions of dollars were being appropriated and not spent. We have also followed projects like India’s Kaveri jet engine, its missile programs, the Arjun tank, et. al., which have consumed a great deal of time (over 20 years in many cases) and many crores of rupees without fielding operational weapons systems.

    The changes required are wide-ranging and complex – but in a democracy, these things eventually come home to roost and reform efforts begin. There have been a few signals lately that these changes may begin at last. Where are they going? Will they succeed?



    Advertisement








    DRDO Dilemmas, 2006

    BrahMos
    PJ-10 BrahMos
    (click to view full)

    With China taking significant steps to improve its defense industry, while funding that industry at levels far higher than a democracy like India can, something clearly has to be done. Opening India up to foreign defense manufacturers, which has been the de facto result of many of DRDO’s project failures, can be an effective solution – vid. the PJ-10 BrahMos missile – but it is not a panacea.

    Scientific Adviser to Defence Minister Shri M. Natarajan’s concerns re: the “triple trap” of relying on foreign defense procurement are well stated:

    # What is developed abroad may not suit local requirements
    # What is suitable may be denied
    # What is not denied could be unaffordable

    Which means India’s defense industry must retain some local capabilities, and work to increase them. To that end, he is correct to note that business as usual won’t suffice.

    In 2006, India Defence reported external link that the Government was looking at “substantial changes” in the existing model of developing advanced defense products. At present, India’s DRDO has to do a lot of the sub-component development work that would be done by Tier 2 and Tier 3 suppliers in America or France. Unsurprisingly, Defence & Research Development Organisation (DRDO) chief M. Natarajan said recently that they have:


    “…proposed greater involvement of stakeholders by sharing project expenditure and management. DRDO is not a manufacturer. Its primary job is to create capacity. The industry is also realising that this would be possible if there is some mechanism of assured minimum quantity and there is some partnership with foreign entities.”

    The Indian MoD release external link is more specific. Natarajan suggested a pattern of funding with DRDO contributing 70%, Industry 20%, and the user Services (Army, Navy, Air Force etc.) 10% for better stakeholding in long term projects.

    That may not be the right ratio, or even the most important step, but note the direction of his thinking.

    Which brings us to other recent statements from various officials external link at the International Seminar On Defence Finance & Economics.

    On the one hand, External Affairs Minister Shri Pranab Mukherjee has called for greater synergies between public spending and private enterprises with regard to defense production. What he appears to mean by this is the traditional pursuit of industrial offsets as part of defense contracts, plus expanded auditing.

    At the same conference, Sir Kevin Tebbit of U.K. presented Britain’s work in the area of ‘Smart Acquisition’ to manage time, cost and performance, while Dr. Elisabeth Wright of the U.S.A. made an presentation on Life Cycle Management of defense acquisition costs.

    All are well and good. None of them appear to address the root issues.

    Techniques like life-cycle management, outcome budgeting and accrual accounting may offer limited help in specific areas, and could become part of a drive to greater accountability for results if used properly. On the other hand, the kind of “oversight” much beloved of politicians can contribute to waste and delays as easily as it prevents them. The core question is, “what is the real problem?”

    Unless that question is answered correctly, such measures as are proposed above can easily become a substitute for real diagnosis, and the opposite of help. Further damage is especially likely if one’s biggest problem is a cultivated environment in which people won’t take risks and paperwork is seen as more important than production, all in a heavily state-owned and run sector. In that environment, even Natarajan’s proposal to shift some project funding away from the state can be seen as a simple offloading of risk and expense onto other entites, while maintaining a controlling share.

    On the other hand, there are currents afoot that could leverage the ideas of synergies with the private sector and a move away from the state as a manufacturer, using industrial offsets to help expand India’s private defense industry, all done in conjunction with expanded use of modern management tools. For instance:

    “Addressing the seminar the Union Finance Minister, Shri P. Chidambaram said that Defence PSUs needs to improve their competitiveness by reducing costs and enhancing productivity. He said, “The argument that the Government in all circumstances must support loss making undertakings or inefficient ordnance factories because of their strategic importance or surge capacities is difficult to sustain in an increasingly globalised world with many more efficient alternatives. Efficiency, productivity and true competitiveness have to be the underpinning of a strong and vibrant Defence Industrial Base.”

    Shri Chidambaram said that optimal allocation and utilisation of resources is the challenge before Defence Finance & Economics. Referring to the many positive aspects of India’s economic growth in the last few years, he stated that policy changes are already in place to allow private sector participation in the Defence sector with up to 100% equity ownership. Shri Chidambaram said the partnership has to be further strengthened and taken to higher levels with greater outsourcing by Defence PSUs, Ordnance Factories, R&D Labs etc. The Minister said Defence Accounts Department must constantly review their systems and procedures for faster service delivery. Shri Chidambaram was of the opinion that Cash Management Systems, Management Information Systems, Migration to International Accounting Standards are some of the important aspects in this context.”

    CMMI
    SEI CMMI 5 Levels
    (click to view full)

    India’s software development community, which boasts more Level 5 CMMI firms than anywhere else in the world, shows that Indian firms are well acquainted with the demands of quality, development of new technologies, and performance to specifications. As this very pro-DRDO but well-referenced entry on Wikipedia documents, the DRDO has also shown the ability to succeed external link with a number of its own projects. Even within that sample set, however, note the patterns in DRDO’s bigger successes like the Pinaka MLRS and BFSR-SR short range 3D battlefield surveillance radar – and also the pattern of failures like the 125mm FSAPDS tank ammunition.

    However, large segments of India’s arms industry are government-owned. Given the number of jobs (read: votes) dependent on these enterprises, the political reality is that closing these firms or even substantially reducing their workload is extremely difficult. The result is an environment of non-accountability.

    One that won’t be fixed by changing the accounting methods.

    There are many other reforms that will be necessary in order to create a defense industry and capability level that matches India’s ambitions external link – but if the core issues revolve around culture and performance, greater involvement by the growing private sector in India’s state-run defence industry and projects is a fine place to start. Most of the other items discussed, from greater use of modern management tools, to increased focus on performance, to a growing private sector capable of partnering effectively with foreign firms and producing key sub-components, can then begin to improve of their own accord.

    Will India succeed? it is impossible to know. One may begin to say, however, that they are headed in the right direction at last.
    India?s DRDO Rethinking the Way it Does Business
     
  12. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    India and Pakistan fought with very similar weapons in 65 and 71, as both forces were successors of British India Army.

    India should buy what works for it. It does not matter if Pakistan also buys the same.

    The only thing is India should not buy piecemeal. The one time purchases normally don't work. Each equipment should be bought as a part of a long term plan so that the spares and additional requirements are accommodated for the plan period.

    While anti-tank missiles, shoulder fired missiles etc. can be bought in trial orders, more critical items like howitzers, tanks. IFVs etc. should be bought from Indian suppliers only. American companies can form joint ventures with local industrial groups.

    America can show its sincerity by setting up GE F414 plant in India. That will prove America means business.
     
  13. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    India prefers local assembly and partial manufacture rather than complete item coming from overseas.

    This is the case with Mig-29 and Su-30. Mig-29 engine license has been granted to India and will be built by HAL.

    This gives higher confidence to Indian military that equipment will be serviceable when needed.
     
  14. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Indian government is now very comfortable with Russia as Russians have set up joint ventures (for example Brahmos, and another one for servicing Russian origin radars).
     
  15. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    US to supply missile warning systems to India



    The United States will supply a missile approach warning system to India to help military aircraft in deploying counter-measures when an enemy missile is fired upon.

    Developed by Alliant Techsystems Operations at Florida, the missile warning system for the Indian Air Force and Navy would come by around 2017. India is purchasing the system using the foreign military sales route.

    The firm has received a $30 million contract from the US government to made these systems for the American armed forces as well as for India, Australia, Spain and Norway. The AN/AAR-47 (V) missile warning set comprises of electro-optic counter-measure sensors, counter-measure signal processors and counter-measure signal simulators.

    The commercial contract was finalised within a month of the summit meeting between the US President Barak Obama and Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

    New Delhi and Washington negotiated the texts of the Defence Framework Agreement between the two countries for the next 10 years as the existing framework signed by then defence minister Pranab Mukherjee and his counterpart Donald Rumsfeld expired in 2014. The new pact, which is yet to be signed, focuses on co-production.

    The two countries identified four joint pathfinder military projects besides creating a working group to explore the possibility of using cutting edge American technologies for Indian Navy’s future aircraft carrier, whose design is still being worked out. A collaboration on jet engine technology is also in the offing.

    The pathfinder projects are on mini-UAV, a proposed roll-on/roll-off mission modules for C-130 and other aircraft, mobile electric hybrid power sources and uniform integrated protection ensemble for the nuclear, biological, chemical (NBC) warfare environment.

    “While these pathfinder projects have stand-alone value, we intend for them to serve as pathfinder or pilots for deeper levels of cooperation between our military. I envision a day when American and Indian engineers sit side-by-side – or at least virtually – producing cutting-edge designs to be produced in partnership,” Frank Kendall, US Under Secretary of Defence for acquisition, Technology and Logistics said.

    Kendall, who is visiting India for the third time in five months, held talks with Indian officials to kick start the projects under the defence technology and trade initiatives between New Delhi and Washington.

    [​IMG]
     
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