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INS Vikramaditya Aircraft Carrier

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by tariqkhan18, Dec 10, 2011.

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  1. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Idiot.
     
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  2. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Whatever You Do, Don’t Buy Your Aircraft Carrier From Russia
    India learned the hard way with INS ‘Vikramaditya’




    Like a lot of countries, India wants the best weapons it can afford. But ideological and financial concerns mean there are a lot of things it won’t buy from the United States or Europe. That pretty much leaves, well, Russia.

    India has been a big buyer of Russian weapons for 50 years. Those haven’t been easy years for New Delhi. India’s defense contracts with Russia have consistently suffered delays and cost overruns. And the resulting hardware doesn’t always work.

    Of all India’s Russian procurement woes, none speak more to the dysfunctional relationship between the two countries than the saga of INS Vikramaditya. In the early 2000s, India went shopping for a new aircraft carrier. What followed was a military-industrial nightmare.

    Wanted—one new(ish) carrier
    In 1988, the Soviet Union commissioned the aircraft carrier Baku. She and her four sisters of the Kiev class represented a unique Soviet design. The front third resembled a heavy cruiser, with 12 giant SS-N-12 anti-ship missiles, up to 192 surface-to-air missiles and two 100-millimeter deck guns. The remaining two-thirds of the ship was basically an aircraft carrier, with an angled flight deck and a hangar.

    Baku briefly served in the Soviet navy until the USSR dissolved in 1991. Russia inherited the vessel, renamed her Admiral Gorshkov and kept her on the rolls of the new Russian navy until 1996. After a boiler room explosion, likely due to a lack of maintenance, Admiral Gorshkov went into mothballs

    In the early 2000s, India faced a dilemma. The Indian navy’s only carrier INS Viraat was set to retire in 2007. Carriers help India assert influence over the Indian Ocean—not to mention, they’re status symbols. New Delhi needed to replace Viraat, and fast.

    India’s options were limited. The only countries building carriers at the time—the United States, France and Italy—were building ships too big for India’s checkbook. In 2004, India and Russia struck a deal in which India would receive Admiral Gorshkov. The ship herself would be free, but India would pay $974 million dollars to Russia to upgrade her.

    It was an ambitious project. At 44,500 tons, Admiral Gorshkov was a huge ship. Already more than a decade old, she had spent eight years languishing in mothballs. Indifference and Russia’s harsh winters are unkind to idle ships.

    Russia would transform the vessel from a helicopter carrier with a partial flight deck to an aircraft carrier with a launch ramp and a flight deck just over 900 feet long. She would be capable of supporting 24 MiG-29K fighters and up to 10 Kamov helicopters.

    She would have new radars, new boilers for propulsion, new arrester wires for catching landing aircraft and new deck elevators. All 2,700 rooms and compartments—spread out over 22 decks—would be refurbished and new wiring would be laid throughout the ship. The “new” carrier would be named Vikramaditya, after an ancient Indian king.

    A real aircraft carrier for less than a billion dollars sounds almost too good to be true. And it was.
     
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Shakedown
    In 2007, just a year before delivery, it became clear that Russia’s Sevmash shipyard couldn’t meet the ambitious deadline. Even worse, the yard demanded more than twice as much money—$2.9 billion in total—to complete the job.

    The cost of sea trials alone, originally $27 million, ballooned to a fantastic $550 million.

    A year later, with the project still in disarray, Sevmash estimated the carrier to be only 49-percent complete. Even more galling, one Sevmash executive suggested that India should pay an additional $2 billion, citing a “market price” of a brand-new carrier at “between $3 billion and $4 billion.”

    For its part, Sevmash claimed that the job was proving much more complicated than anyone had ever imagined. Nobody had tried converting a ship into an aircraft carrier since World War II.
    Sevmash specialized in submarine construction and had never worked on an aircraft carrier before. The ship had been originally built at the Nikolayev Shipyards, which after the breakup of the Soviet Union became part of the Ukraine. The tooling and specialized equipment used to build Admiral Gorshkov was thousands of miles away and now in a foreign country.

    Like many contractors, defense or otherwise, Sevmash had its unhappy employer over a barrel. With the job halfway done, and having already dropped $974 million, India could not afford to walk away from the deal. Russia knew it, and was blunt about India’s options. “If India does not pay up, we will keep the aircraft carrier,” one defense ministry official told RIA-Novosti.
     

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  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    There will be grave consequences’
    By 2009, the project was deadlocked and word was starting to get around the defense industry. Russian arms exports for 2009 totaled $8 billion, and Sevmash’s delays and extortionary tactics weren’t good for the Russian defense industry as a whole.

    In July 2009, Russia’s then-president Dmitri Medvedev made a high-profile visit to the Sevmash shipyard. Indian news reported that the carrier was still half-done, meaning that the yard had done virtually no work on the ship for two years as it held out for more money.

    Medvedev publicly scolded Sevmash officials. “You need to complete [Vikramaditya] and hand it over our partners,” the visibly irritated president told Sevmash general director Nikolai Kalistratov.

    “Otherwise,” he added, “there will be grave consequences.”
    In 2010, the Indian government agreed to more than double the budget for the carrier to $2.2 billion. This was less than the $2.9 billion Sevmash demanded, and much less than Sevmash’s suggested “market price” of $4 billion.

    Suddenly, Sevmash magically started working harder—actually, twice as hard—and finished the other half of the upgrades in only three years. Vikramaditya finally entered sea trials in August 2012 and commissioned into the Indian navy in November 2013.

    At the commissioning ceremony, Indian Defense Minister AK Anthony expressed relief that the ordeal was over, telling the press that there was a time “when we thought we would never get her.”
     
  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Vikramaditya, post-makeover. Photo via Wikipedia
    Enduring woes
    Now that Vikramaditya is finally in service, India’s problems are over, right? Not by a long shot. Incredibly, India has chosen Sevmash to do out-of-warranty work on the ship for the next 20 years.

    Keeping Vikramaditya supplied with spare parts will be a major task in itself. Ten Indian contractors helped to build the carrier, but so did more than 200 other contractors in Russia, Croatia, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, Finland, France, Norway, Poland, Sweden and the U.K. Some countries, particularly Japan, were likely unaware they were exporting parts for a foreign weapons system.

    The ship’s boilers, which provide Vikramaditya with power and propulsion, are a long-term concern. All eight boilers are new. But yard workers discovered defects in them. During her trip from Russia to India, the flattop suffered a boiler breakdown, which Sevmash chalked up to poor-quality Chinese firebricks.

    China denied ever exporting the firebricks.

    Finally, Vikramaditya lacks active air defenses. The ship has chaff and flare systems to lure away anti-ship missiles, but she doesn’t have any close-in weapons systems like the American Phalanx.

    India could install local versions of the Russian AK-630 gun system, but missiles will have to wait until the ship is in drydock again—and that could be up to three years from now. In the meantime, Vikramaditya will have to rely on the new Indian air-defense destroyer INS Kolkata for protection from aircraft and missiles.

    As for Sevmash? After the Vikramaditya fiasco, the yard is strangely upbeat about building more carriers … and has identified Brazil as a possible buyer. “Sevmash wants to build aircraft carriers,” said Sergey Novoselov, the yard’s deputy general director.

    That almost sounds like a threat.

    War is boring, buts that's the story of the Vikramaditya fiasco.
     
  6. The Drdo Guy

    The Drdo Guy Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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  7. The Drdo Guy

    The Drdo Guy Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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  8. arulcharles

    arulcharles Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    This is about old Vikrant

    Bajaj V – A bike made of INS Vikrant’s metal – Launching on February 1

    [​IMG]


    The mystery bike from Bajaj, scheduled to be launched on 1st February 2016, could be a new brand introduction for the company. The new brand could be called Bajaj V, as the recent teaser video reveals.

    Bajaj Auto says that the new motorcycle is made from the metal of INS Vikrant – the first aircraft carrier of the Indian Navy – that had played an important role during 1971 Indo-Pak war. After serving the nation for almost 4 decades, the INS Vikrant was decommissioned in 1997, and was preserved as a museum ship in Mumbai till 2012. It was finally scraped in January 2014.

    “For decades, she remained invincible bravely guarding our seas. However in 2014, this iconic war hero was sent to the scrapyard. But we, at Bajaj, were determined not to let history fade away into oblivion. So we took INS Vikrant’s metal, melted it and gave it a new face – Bajaj V.”, said Bajaj Auto.

    Though there is no official word yet on its positioning and pricing, the first motorcycle under Bajaj V brand could be a premium commuter in 150cc space and could be called the Bajaj V150. There are speculation about this one being a 150cc bike, so expect it to be christened Bajaj V150. The teased bike looks like a scrambler with subtle hints of cafe racer in it. With this bike, the company will target buyers looking for a premium motorcycle at an affordable price.

    Expected to be positioned between the Discover 150 and the Pulsar AS150, the Bajaj V150cc could feature the same 144.8cc engine that powers the Discover 150 siblings. This engine, mated to a 5-speed constant mesh gearbox, churns out 14bhp and 12.75Nm.



    Bajaj Auto teases V range; to be made from INS Vikrant metal : Latest Auto News, News - India Today
     
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  9. Gessler

    Gessler Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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  10. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  11. The Drdo Guy

    The Drdo Guy Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    I'm going to buy this bike.
     
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  12. lookieloo

    lookieloo 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Love the Cafe-Racer look. Own a 2005 Triumph Bonneville myself. British racing green.
     
  13. lookieloo

    lookieloo 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Come on yo...

    You, of all people, should know that David Axe is a complete $hithead. His dumbass hipster blog is akin to a bunch of vegetarians trying to write a meat-industry journal.
     
  14. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    I am not aware of anything in the article that was not the truth.
     
  15. lookieloo

    lookieloo 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    So it cost more than expected and took awhile to work out some kinks... wish someone would pay me to cry over spilled-milk.

    As carriers go, India ended up getting what it paid for (though not the bargain originally hoped), and the hipster's two-year-old predictions of frequent breakdowns haven't materialized. Hell, this 30 year-old piece of Soviet "junk" appears to be more reliable than some of our brand-new ships.
     

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