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Intelligence and National Security - News and Discussion

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by Agent_47, Aug 4, 2017.

  1. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    New sticky to track updates on Indian Intelligence Agencies

    Intro :


    1. RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS WING
    The most commonly know agency of India, R&AW is the frontline intelligence provider in India. The Agency though very young is know for its work all over the world and is considered one of the best. It was established in 1968 following the intelligence failures of the Sino-Indian and Indo-Pakistani wars, which persuaded the Government of India to create a specialised, independent agency dedicated to foreign intelligence gathering. R&AW receives little to no attention from the populace, which seems to be unaware of the existence of such an organisation or even India’s internal intelligence agency, theIntelligence Bureau (IB). The excessive secrecy surrounding activities and rare declassification of the information are considered to be the major reasons behind this.

    [​IMG]

    FORMED IN: 1968

    AREA OF WORK: Foreign Intelligence

    IMPORTANT OPS: creation of Bangladesh, op smiling buddha, Indo-Pak War of 71,99

    2. INTELLIGENCE BUREAU

    IB stands for Intelligence Bureau and is an autonomous body that was created through an executive order of the government. IB is not an investigative agency and is primarily concerned with a specialised analysis of information. It is also the oldest intelligence agency in the country, created by the government in 1947 at the time of independence. IB carries out intelligence inside the country and counter insurgency and counter terrorism strategies are made based upon analysis of information due by IB. IB specialises in covert, secretive operations and helps the government in formulating foreign policy towards countries with which India does not seem to have good, friendly relations. The members of Intelligence bureau were trained initially by the KGB of

    IB specialises in covert, secretive operations and helps the government in formulating foreign policy towards countries with which India does not seem to have good, friendly relations. The members of Intelligence bureau were trained initially by the KGB of Russia

    [​IMG]

    FORMED IN: Initially in 1887, recrafted in 1947

    AREA OF WORK: Internal intelligence.

    IMPORTANT OPS: Indo-sino war 1962, Indo-Pak 65

    3. NATIONAL TECHNICAL RESEARCH ORGANISATION

    The National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO) is a technical intelligence agency under the National Security Adviser in the Prime Minister’s Office, India. ] It also includes National Institute of Cryptology Research and Development (NICRD), which is first of its kind in Asia. NTRO is responsible for providing technical intelligence to other agencies on internal and external security. The agency is under the control of India’s external intelligence agency,Research and Analysis Wing, although it remains autonomous to some degree.

    [​IMG]

    FORMED IN: 2004

    AREA OF WORK: Provide Intelligence to other agencies/ Coordinate gathered intel both foreign and domestic

    IMPORTANT OPS: Provided the intel to ICG in blowing up of the pakistani ship on the eve of new year ie 31-12-2014.

    4. NARCOTICS CONTROL BUREAU

    The NCB is the primary organisation in India to cut and monitor the drug business. The NCB is the law enforcement and intelligence agency of India responsible for fighting drug trafficking and the abuse of illegal substances. It is under the home ministry of India. The major reason for the formation the bureau was to cut down drug trafficking and reduce drug abuse in India. the agency was formed at a time when drug crimes were in peak.

    [​IMG]

    FORMED IN: 1986

    AREA OF WORK: Law enforcement and intellignce on drug trafficking

    IMPORTANT OPS: operations in coordination with BSF Punjab border, ops with BSF/AMRY Indo-Myanmar border

    5. DEFENCE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

    The Defence Intelligence Agency (D.I.A.) is an organisation responsible for providing and coordinating intelligence for the Indian armed forces. They deal only with intelligence realteed to defence and thus differ from RAW in that manner.DIA has control of Indian Army’s prized technical intelligence assets –

    • the Directorate of Signals Intelligence
    • the Defence Image Processing and Analysis Centre (DIPAC).
    While the Signals Directorate is responsible for acquiring and decrypting enemy communications, the DIPAC controls India’s satellite-based image acquisition capabilities. The DIA also controls the Defence Information Warfare Agency (DIWA) which handles all elements of the information warfare repertoire, including psychological operations, cyber-war, electronic intercepts and the monitoring of sound waves.

    [​IMG]

    FORMED IN: 2002

    AREA OF WORK: Defence related Intelligence both foreign and domestic

    The DIA reduces the armed forces reliance on civil intelligence agencies.


    6. Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI)

    The Directorate of Revenue Intelligence works according to the directive of the Central Board of Excise and customs(CBEC), in the Ministry of Finance, Department of Revenue. This agency works as a free-floater among all the other intelligence units. It provides information to every other department about irregular trades and threats in and outside India. The DRI also keeps a watch on important investigations and helps officials cover legal loopholes at times. The DRI has been instrumental in curbing down India's smuggling rate.


    7.Joint Cipher Bureau

    The Joint Cipher Bureau works closely with the IB and RAW. It is responsible for cryptanalysis and encryption of sensitive data. The inter-services Joint Cipher Bureau has primary responsibility for cryptology and SIGINT, providing coordination and direction to the other military service organizations with similar mission. Most current equipment providing tactical intelligence is of Russian origin, including specialized direction finding and monitoring equipment.

    The Joint Cipher Bureau is also responsible for issues relating to public and private key management. Cryptographic products are export-controlled licensed items, and licenses to India are not generally available for products of key length of more than 56 bits. The domestic Indian computer industry primarily produces PCs, and PC-compatible cryptographic products have been developed and are being used commercially. More robust encryption systems are not commercially produced in India, and progress in this field has been slow due to the general unavailability of technology and know-how. Customised cryptographic products have been designed and produced by organizations in the defense sector are engaged in the implementation of cryptographic techniques, protocols and the products.
     
  2. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    How Two Months of Surveillance Led to Rs 3,500-Crore Heroin Bust

    Kolkata: The seizure of 1,500 kg heroin, touted to be the biggest narcotics bust in the country, was done after closely tracking the movement of the cartel members for over two months.

    According to authorities, the captain of the merchant ship, Suprit Tiwari, came on the radar of the security agencies on May 21 after the arrest of a seaman, Parveen Kumar, from the Indira Gandhi International Airport in Delhi for carrying a fake Continuous Discharge Certificate (CDC), also known as the Seaman Service Book (SSB). CDC is a must for seamen and is issued by the authorities in Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata.



    Kumar, according to agencies, was about to leave for Iran via Sharjah on an Air Arabia flight. He was to be a seaman with a Panama CDC that was valid till 2021. He broke down during questioning and told the investigators that the fake certificate was given by Tiwari, a captain based in Kolkata.

    He also disclosed that Tiwari was involved in smuggling drugs into the country, sources said. “Since then, various intelligence agencies were keeping a tabs on Suprit and finally he was arrested on Sunday, along with other crew members,” police sources said. Suprit’s brother Sujit, who works with a private firm in Kolkata, has also been detained for questioning.

    The Indian Coast Guard had seized the contraband worth Rs 3,500 crore off the Gujarat shoreline after intelligence reports. Eight crew members — all Indians — were taken into custody.

    The Panama-registered ship, named MV Hennery, was seized after a three-day operation based on intelligence inputs. It was taken to Porbandar on Sunday for further investigation, the Coast Guard said.

    The ship was coming from Iran and was bound for Alang in Gujarat. This is a biggest ever haul of narcotics drugs, transported through sea routes in recent times.

    The vessel was spotted around 380km off Dwarka through surveillance mounted by the National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO), a government intelligence-gathering agency.


    http://www.news18.com/news/india/ho...to-the-rs-3500-crore-heroin-bust-1477567.html
     
  3. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    NTRO now under Intelligence Act

    Will have same curbs as IB, RAW
    The National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO), which reports to the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) and the National Security Advisor (NSA) will now have the same “norms of conduct” as the Intelligence Bureau (IB) and the Research and Analysis Wing (R&AW).

    The Home Ministry issued a notification on May 15 listing NTRO under The Intelligence Organisations (Restriction of Rights) Act, 1985, a demand being made by the organisation for over a decade now.

    Few strictures

    The Act prevents employees of a notified agency from forming unions/associations, puts restrictions on the employee’s freedom of speech, bars any communication with the press, or publishing a book or other document without the permission of the head of the intelligence organisation.

    Both IB and R&AW have on earlier occasions opposed the inclusion of any other organisation in the list of monitoring agencies under the Act.

    In 2012, the Home Ministry under the UPA government had declined to give phone surveillance powers to NTRO arguing that it was not notified under the Act.

    The NTRO was created after the 1999 Kargil conflict as a dedicated technical intelligence agency.

    It has been fighting tooth and nail to get included in the list as it has the right to lawfully intercept and monitor communications externally.

    Many security agencies like the National Investigation Agency (NIA), the Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI), the Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB) among others have been asking the Home Ministry to include them under the Intelligence Organisations Act.

    “In the schedule to the Intelligence Organisations (Restriction of Rights) Act, 1985 after serial number 3 and the entries relating thereto, the following shall be inserted namely-The National Technical Research Organisation,” the notification issued by the Home Ministry said.

    Interception powers

    An NTRO official told The Hindu that the amendment had nothing to do with enhanced interception powers but to “bring certain norms of conduct applicable to other intelligence agencies.” The official said the Act does not allow them to intercept phones internally.

    NTRO hires many people from the private sector and the Act means they will have the same safety net and restrictions available to other spy agencies.

    “The Official Secrets Act is already applicable to NTRO employees. We have restrictions about getting involved in political activities in the country among other things. We only make external intrusions,” said the NTRO official.

    Another official said, “We are also working for the country. No one seems to recognise that. The notification will bring that respect and sanctity to our work.”


    http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/ntro-now-under-intelligence-act/article18475771.ece
     
  4. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    650 new combat posts for better intelligence gathering at border approved

    The centre has given its nod for setting up 650 combat posts for better intelligence gathering. This would add strength to the Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB), the force guarding India's borders with Nepal and Bhutan. Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) personnel take part in passing out parade at their training headquarters in Chandukhedi near Bhopal. Photo credit: PTI This unit would help anticipate threats and also assist the SSB which is the lead intelligence agency for the Indo-Nepal and Indo-Bhutan borders. The SSB guards the two borders where there are no restrictions on the movement of people on either side. The area under the SSB jurisdiction comprises densely populated foothills and plains, thick jungles, underdeveloped regions and inhospitable terrains. An official statement from the government said, "There is trans-border movement of criminals and anti-national elements and it poses a major challenge on the border in the context of the visa-free regime. Most of the stretches of the border are infested with ISI activists, insurgent groups, Maoists, fundamentalists, smugglers of narcotics, arms and fake currency, and human traffickers." The SSB had earlier sent a proposal to the Ministry of Home Affairs for setting up an intelligence unit to strengthen the efficiency and operational mandate of the

    Read more at: http://www.oneindia.com/india/650-n...nce-gathering-at-border-approved-2495059.html
     
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  5. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    How 'Operation Pigeon' prevented Kerala Muslims from joining ISIS

    "Operation Pigeon." This is the name given to an operation that is being carried out by the Kerala police, Central Intelligence Bureau and the National Investigating Agency to prevent the youth of Kerala from joining the Islamic State. The operation was launched following the incident in which over 20 youth slipped out of Kerala and joined the IS in Afghanistan. This incident caused a great amount of concern among the security agencies who then went on to form a special squad to stop the menace.

    Under Operation Pigeon, the first step was to gain control over the social media. The officers scanned thousands of accounts of those persons who were showing interest in joining the ISIS or any other terrorist group. The team focused largely in and around Kasargod.

    The team then met with community elders and parent of the youth. The parents and the elders were very responsive, officials said. One officer part of the operation informed OneIndia that these youth who were identified as vulnerable were counselled by the elders, parents and the police. The session on counselling was overseen by the team comprising the Intelligence Bureau and the National Investigating Agency.

    The team then met with community elders and parent of the youth. The parents and the elders were very responsive, officials said. One officer part of the operation informed OneIndia that these youth who were identified as vulnerable were counselled by the elders, parents and the police. The session on counselling was overseen by the team comprising the Intelligence Bureau and the National Investigating Agency.

    Read more at: http://www.oneindia.com/india/how-o...kerala-muslims-from-joining-isis-2481637.html
     
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  6. GuardianRED

    GuardianRED Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Gujarat coast drug haul: Pak villains sent shipment from Gwadar port in Balochistan


    A coast guard investigation into a massive 1,500-kg heroin haul off Gujarat coast last week points to the involvement of Pakistani nationals in sending the shipment from the Chinese-controlled Gwadar port in Balochistan.

    Sources said authorities are also trying to ascertain if the consignment seized in the country's largest-ever drugs catch was part of a terror network and the money earned could have been used to fuel anti-India operations in the region.

    "Preliminary investigations suggest that narcotics were embarked off Gwadar (port in Pakistan) in about three boats. From there it proceeded to Abu Dhabi wherein extensive work was carried out in the engine room and the fittings to conceal the narcotics," Coast Guard's inspector general of operations S Parmesh told Mail Today.

    The Gwadar port in Pakistan has been built recently by the Chinese and is controlled and operated by Beijing for both military and merchant seafaring.

    Senior government sources said interrogation of the eight Indian crew members of the ship 'Hennry' apprehended with the Rs 3,500-crore drugs revealed that a Pakistani national, Khalid Mohammed, and an Iranian called Mustafa had helped load the narcotics in Abu Dhabi.

    "Welders and cutters were provided to the crew to modify the cabins and conceal the drugs in such a way that even if the ship was checked, it would have become difficult for the agencies to find it," the sources said. Knowing about the risk involved in travelling with the ship, the two kingpins disembarked in Abu Dhabi before the ship set sail towards Indian waters, headed to Alang.

    Experts say Pakistan's drug smuggling network is inextricably linked with other illegal operations, including terrorism. India has sought to prevent the trafficking of narcotics into the country, alongside a larger push to improve coastal security following the 2008 Mumbai terror strike that saw the attackers sneak in through the sea route.

    The origin of the heroin consignment is believed to be in Afghanistan from where it was brought to Gwadar.

    "From Alang, the 1,526 packets of heroin could have reached different parts of India and to Southeast Asian countries as well," the sources said.

    The National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO) also played a key role in the operation as its sleuths picked up the calls between the crew of the ship and their handlers before tipping off the Coast Guard.

    The Coast Guard, which takes care of the western waters, carried out an extensive operation by deploying several ships and Dornier surveillance aircraft to track the suspect vessel.

    After an extensive search, Coast Guard Ship Samudra Pavak had intercepted and apprehended the Panama-registered vessel off the coast of Gujarat, official sources said Sunday.

    Intelligence inputs received on July 17 indicated the presence of an Iranian cargo vessel Prince-II about 210 miles west of Porbandar, which is not inside Indian waters. The vessel was expected to make a landing between Jamnagar and Bhavnagar on the Saurashtra coast.

    Thereafter, Indian Coast Guard centres at Mumbai, Gandhinagar and Porbandar were activated, ICG ships alerted and Dornier aircraft sorties undertaken to track down the vessel. Air surveillance narrowed down on two inbound cargo vessels, which were intercepted and detained on July 26 for investigation at Okha port.

    In the meantime, a Dornier aircraft sanitising the area near Gulf of Khambhat picked up another vessel that was not recognised on the Automatic Identification System and was marked suspicious. ICGS Samudra Pavak was diverted to intercept the vessel Henry.

    When quizzed, the master of the ship said the vessel had no documents as it was headed to the Alang ship-breaking yard in Bhavnagar to be broken. The vessel was subsequently detained and was tugged to the Porbandar port on Sunday where the authorities during inspection found the vessel to be carrying 1,500 kg of heroin.

    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/...ipment-gwadar-port-balochistan/1/1017518.html
     
  7. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Defence Intelligence Agency authorised to get black money details from FIU

    NEW DELHI, FEBRUARY 19:
    The Defence Intelligence Agency (DIA), a snoop-arm under the Defence Ministry, has been authorised to get details relating to suspected international wire transfers and banking transactions from Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU).

    The move is aimed at arming the DIA with necessary details to act against terror funding and hawala transactions, mainly in Jammu and Kashmir and in the North-Eastern States of the country, officials said today.

    The DIA is expected to generate more action-oriented inputs to check financial crimes on the basis of analysis of FIU reports, the officials said.

    The Defence Intelligence Agency, set up following the recommendations of the Kargil Committee headed by eminent strategic expert K Subrahmanyam, provides technical inputs to the Defence Ministry and other agencies concerned.

    The DIA is the latest entrant in the list of 20 other organisations, including the Supreme Court-appointed Special Investigation Team (SIT) to check black money and the country’s external and internal snooping agencies Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) and Intelligence Bureau (IB) respectively, that are empowered to seek details from the FIU on dubious financial transactions, as per an official order.

    The FIU is tasked with collecting, analysing and disseminating information related to financial transactions suspected to be black money or proceeds of crime.

    It receives and analyses Cash Transaction Reports (CTRs), Cross Border Wire Transfer Reports (CBWTRs), Reports on Purchase or Sale of Immovable Property (IPRs) and Suspicious Transaction Reports (STRs) from various reporting entities.

    The FIU also shares information with Enforcement Directorate (ED), Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), Reserve Bank of India (RBI), Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI), National Investigation Agency (NIA), Central Vigilance Commission (CVC), National Intelligence Grid (Natgrid) Central Economic Intelligence Bureau (CEIB) and other agencies.

    http://www.thehindubusinessline.com...ack-money-details-from-fiu/article9550653.ece
     
  8. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Parliamentary panel raps intelligence agencies for failure to prevent terror attacks


    New Delhi:
    A parliamentary panel has rapped intelligence agencies for the terror attacks in Pathankot, Uri and a few other places saying these strikes “exposed the deficiencies” of the agencies but there was no analysis of their “failure”.

    The parliamentary standing committee on home affairs, headed by senior Congress leader P. Chidambaram, said a year had passed since the 2 January, 2016 terror attack at the Indian Air Force station in Pathankot but the probe has not been completed by the National Investigation Agency.

    Moreover, it said, no analysis seems to have been done of the “failure” of the intelligence agencies to provide credible and actionable inputs regarding the attacks at Pathankot, Uri, Pampore, Baramulla and Nagrota.

    “The committee feels that these attacks have exposed the deficiencies of our intelligence agencies,” it said.

    While in the Pathankot attack, seven security personnel were killed, 19 army soldiers lost their lives in the attack at the Brigade headquarters in Uri on September 18 last year. Terrorists also attacked a convoy of CRPF vehicles on 25 June, 2016 at Pampore along

    the Srinagar-Jammu highway, killing eight paramilitary personnel.

    While in Baramulla district of Jammu and Kashmir, militants attacked a camp of the Rashtriya Rifles killing a security personnel on 3 October, 2016, seven soldiers were killed when an army base in Nagrota in the state was attacked by militants on 29 November, 2016.

    “The committee, therefore, recommends that the (home) ministry should instruct the NIA to complete the investigations of these attacks at the earliest so as to identify the loopholes in the intelligence setup in the border areas,” it said.

    Taking note of “huge rise” in the number of infiltration, the committee said the government must carry out a thorough investigation into the sudden spurt in infiltration attempts along the Line of Control from across the border and find out vulnerabilities that are being apparently exploited by the infiltrators. There were 364 attempts of infiltration in 2016 of which 112 were successful in comparison to 121 infiltration attempts and 33 net infiltration in 2015.

    The committee also noted that there has been an increasing number of incidents of infiltration through tunnels from across the border. The panel felt that in future this might become a major modus operandi of the infiltrators and the government must take proactive steps to foil such attempts.

    “The committee recommends that the ministry must explore technological solutions for tunnel detection in border areas and should seek the help of other countries which have successfully developed tunnel detection systems,” it said.

    http://www.livemint.com/Politics/By...raps-intelligence-agencies-for-failure-t.html
     
  9. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    The Controversial National Counter Terrorism Centre With Far-Reaching Powers Is All Set To Be Revived

    The National Counter Terrorism Centre that was earlier blocked by states like Gujarat, West Bengal and Odisha, is being revived, top officials of Ministry Home Affairs (MHA) have told
    HuffPost India.

    The NCTC, mooted in the aftermath of 26/11 Mumbai terror attack, was to be one-stop-counter-terror body of India. The proposed NCTC had powers to gather intelligence, carry out counter-terror operations and investigate terror attacks.


    For this purpose, the Multi-Agency Centre (MAC) – an intelligence sharing platform that operates under the Intelligence Bureau – and the National Investigative Agency (NIA) was to be subsumed into the NCTC. The NIA was to be restructured as the investigative arm of the NCTC and the MAC reorganized as the intelligence arm of the counter terror body.


    State governments had been apprehensive of the investigative and operational powers of the NCTC and had therefore pointed to possible "political misuse" by the centre against the states. And, although the Manmohan Singh-led UPA Government toned down powers of NCTC, it failed to convince the states.


    Those who opposed the NCTC then included West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, then Chief Minister of Gujarat and now Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Odisha Chief Minister Navin Patnaik.

    Issues of law and order and policing are the domain of individual state governments as per the Constitution of India. Opposing the NCTC, the states had said the investigative powers of the body violated the federal structure of the Indian Constitution.


    MHA sources said that NCTC will be under the Union Home Ministry. "We will try and convince states that they will be equal partners in combating terrorism," the officer said.

    A mother database
    The other crucial arm of the NCTC – the National Intelligence Grid (NATGRID) is also nearly complete, sources said. The NATGRID is a mother data base comprising 22 separate data bases like driving licences, passport details, bank accounts, income tax, foreign travel etc. is also ready. The NATGRID links all these data bases that are now kept separately.

    There are concerns about the NATGRID, too. Opponents point to possible violation of privacy and misuse. "The NATGRID will manage and hold the data, they cannot access the data. The data can only be accessed by the investigative agencies," the officer said.

    MHA sources said that the ministry will soon start process of moving the Union Cabinet. After the Union Cabinet clears the proposal, South Block will again have to start the process of getting states on board.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.in/2017/0...ter-terrorism-centre-with-far-rea_a_22037095/

    @Abingdonboy

    Centre pushing to revive NATGRID, looking for CEO

    To rope in an intelligence official to head the federal counter-terror centre.

    The Union government is set to make an aggressive effort to accomplish one of the most ambitious intelligence projects in recent memory, which failed to take off during United Progressive Alliance rule.

    Conceived in the wake of the 2008 Mumbai attacks, the National Intelligence Grid (NATGRID) is a centralised agency which stores sensitive personal information on citizens from almost two dozen agencies to be made available for counter-terror investigations.

    Multiple sources say the government will appoint a senior serving government official, in all likelihood one with an intelligence background, to head NATGRID, with a mandate to operationalise it as a federal counter-terrorism centre.

    Contract not renewed

    Soon after it came to power last year, the National Democratic Alliance government refused to renew the contract of Raghu Raman, NATGRID’s first and only CEO, who had bagged the job while working for automobile major Mahindra. Mr. Raman’s contract was not renewed by Home Minister Rajnath Singh on the basis of an alleged adverse intelligence report. Though the government has kept its options open for private citizens to apply this time, a senior official said it was keen on intelligence officials.

    UPA’s showpiece project

    One of the UPA’s biggest showpiece internal security projects, the grid was to provide an intelligence database that would have networked 21 sets of data sources to provide quick and secure access of information to about 10 intelligence and law-enforcement agencies including the Intelligence Bureau (IB) and R&AW. These data sources include records related to immigration entry and exit, banking and financial transactions.

    Ashok Prasad, Secretary, Internal Security, who is holding additional charge of NATGRID, is said to be the frontrunner for the post. Mr. Prasad, a 1979 batch IPS officer of Andhra Pradesh cadre lost the race to become the IB chief last year when the government decided to appoint his junior Dineshwar Sharma to the post. There is an understanding that the government wants to compensate him for the loss.

    “But, this government is known for making unconventional appointments. It is a sensitive and important post and the government would want a trustworthy person to hold this post. NATGRID will have access to all kinds of data under one roof and can also prove to be counter-productive if misused,” said the official. Last year, former IIT-Kanpur Director Sanjay Govind Dhande was in the race but the proposal fell through.


    On December 16, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) issued a circular to fill the post of CEO of NATGRID. The circular calls for applicants with a Masters in Electronics, IT or equivalent with an experience of working in the IT-related field for 25 years. Both serving as well as retired government officials can apply.


    The circular also says that if a private person is hired, his/her salary would be Rs. 10 lakh a month and if it’s a government servant, it will be his last drawn salary or the present salary.

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...ve-natgrid-looking-for-ceo/article8046068.ece
     
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  10. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    NIA arrests photojournalist Kamran Yusuf (Pulwama) from Kashmir for alleged links with terror/anti-social elements in the valley.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    2,000 SSB staffers to go to Intelligence Bureau; govt approves border snoop plan


    NEW DELHI: Over 2,000 personnel of a "dying" paramilitary cadre will be "transferred" to the Intelligence Bureau (IB) to boost the on-ground presence of the agency on the eastern borders, where India is bolstering its defences by building roads and other military infrastructure.

    A total of 2,765 posts of the civilian cadre of the Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) will be shifted to the IB command over the next year. Of these posts, 2,039 are operational.

    "The civil wing of the SSB should be transferred to the IB lock, stock and barrel, including land, physical infrastructure, equipment among others," a government blueprint, accessed by PTI, said.

    A top security official privy to the "ambitious" plan said a 300-page proposal for the transfer of the assets -- both manpower and infrastructure -- had been prepared at the SSB headquarters here and had been vetted by the home ministry and the office of the national security advisor (NSA) for final implementation.

    He added that the manpower of the civil wing of the SSB, which is termed as "dying" as it does not have promotional and work avenues, would be deployed to bolster the IB's presence in the eastern border areas, where these officials have worked for long.

    The average age of the cadre, the official said, was above 50 years and the personnel had done a lot of work with the people living along the Nepal and Bhutan borders.

    They not only helped them integrate with the mainstream, but also acted as the "eyes and ears" of the SSB, the designated lead intelligence agency on the two borders.

    The cadre was first raised in 1963, in the aftermath of the Chinese aggression of the previous year, to work in the border areas and promote a sense of national belonging and pro-India feelings among the local population.

    It worked under the external intelligence agency -- Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) -- till 2001, under the name Special Service Bureau.

    The name of the force was changed to Sashastra Seema Bal in 2003, following the 1999 Kargil conflict. It was then tasked with guarding the Indo-Nepal and Indo-Bhutan borders on the country's eastern flank.

    "The transfer of the civilian SSB cadre will begin once the long-awaited cadre restructuring of the force is approved and implemented. All this will take about a year to take shape," the official said.

    The blueprint envisages that once these officials are transferred to the IB, they will be "utilised for different activities related to intelligence, keeping in view the expertise and proficiency of the incumbents".

    "These personnel have only been doing civic action work and publicity of government schemes in the far-flung border areas and anti-Naxal operation zones for close to two decades now.

    "After the SSB was declared an armed force of the Union in 2001, they became a dying cadre as they were not uniformed personnel. Now, their experience and knowledge of the locals, languages and natural features of the border areas will be used to aid the hardcore intelligence work of the IB," the official said.

    He added that as per the blueprint, the cadre, after the proposed transfer, "will be treated at par with the IB employees" and some of them might even be retained post retirement considering their expertise and knowledge of the field areas.

    The cadre, for the last over 50 years, has been working in insurgency-hit areas along the border and Naxal-hit states, undertaking civic welfare programmes such as teaching children in schools, conducting medical camps and organising vocational training courses.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...es-border-snoop-plan/articleshow/60409192.cms
     
  12. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    After Hurriyat arrests, Srinagar businessman Zahoor Watali under intelligence radar

    India's intelligence establishment is moving swiftly to choke off every source of support to perpetrators of trouble in the Kashmir Valley, zeroing in on suspected conduits for terrorist funding, highly-placed officials said.

    According to most-senior intelligence officials, the probe into the bankrolling of the unrest has widened following India Today's scathing expose of the Hurriyat's Pakistani financing. Seven separatist leaders have already been arrested.

    Under the radar now are various ISI-backed businesses funnelling funds to separatists and terrorists.

    A Srinagar businessman, Zahoor Watali, tops the list of alleged financers of Kashmiri troublemakers, highest-ranking intelligence officials told India Today.

    A mover and shaker of Kashmir's high society, Watali is resident of Srinagar's Baghat Barzulla neighbourhood. He's known for his proximity to political leaders across the spectrum, opposition and ruling parties alike.

    Watali's business empire spans from Kashmir to the UAE to Europe, spread across real-estate and international trade.

    HURRIYAT'S MONEYBAG

    But intelligence officials disclosed to India Today they suspect his companies were a facade hiding money laundering and terror finance.

    "The man's believed to be the Hurriyat's moneybag," said a top source. Intelligence officials, poring over Watali's every financial transaction, found he maintained an NRI account in 2004-05 at a leading bank in New Delhi without having spent the required 180 days overseas for the foreign-residency status.

    For months, he received monthly inward remittances of Rs 2 lakh-Rs 2.6 lakh from Dubai into his FCNRE bank account in the national capital, the sources revealed.

    Watali, intelligence officials said, also had an account at the UAE's RAK Bank, from where he transferred more than Rs 53.60 lakh from March to December in 2011.

    Documents accessed by India Today showed the money was credited into his account at the J&K Bank's Air Cargo branch in Srinagar.

    MYSTERIOUS TRANSACTIONS

    The original source of these sums, according to intelligence sources, is a mystery.

    Intelligence officials have found out Watali, however, never declared these inflows in his annual returns. Further, his bank statement from the period reveals large amounts were moved from his J&K bank account to his construction companies, his wife Sarwa Begum and to a medical college in Jammu.

    Watali's properties were part of addresses the NIA raided in Kashmir and Delhi after India Today uncovered Hurriyat-Pakistan connections.

    Investigators are now questioning him for his alleged links with the ISI.

    According to intelligence officials, Watali's top-ranking friends in the rogue spy agency include Brig. Mir Hafiz Sohail, Brig (retired) Javeed Aziz Khan and Maj-Gen. (retired) Rashid Qureshi.

    Watali also had ties with Sardar Attique Ahmed Khan and Sultan Mehmood Chaudhry, the former prime ministers of Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK), the sources disclosed.

    This businessman's police record, intelligence sources said, dates back to 1990, when he was first arrested for allegedly harbouring Kashmiri militants.

    He was taken into custody again in 1994.

    Once a car driver of Abdul Ghani Lone, the slain separatist leader, Watali is now believed to have penetrating connections in the ISI.

    The NIA is examining his deals, local and global, bit by bit, top officials said.

    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/...-zahoor-watali-isi-businessmen/1/1016443.html
     
  13. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Public needs to know more about R&AW

    Concerns about politicisation of our intelligence and its impact on foreign ties can be addressed by being less secretive

    The case of Commander Kulbhushan Jadhav, a retired (according to New Delhi) Indian naval officer under arrest in Pakistan since March 2016, has attracted tremendous public attention. Pakistan has accused Jadhav of working for the Research and Analysis Wing (R&AW) —India’s premier external intelligence agency — and in April 2017, a court martial sentenced him to death for abetting “terrorism” inside Pakistan.

    India denies this claim and has secured a stay on Jadhav’s execution from the International Courts of Justice. A relatively less discussed case is that of retired Pakistani officer Lieutenant Colonel Muhammad Habib Zahir, who mysteriously disappeared from Lumbini in Nepal. Allegedly in Indian custody, Zahir was “picked up” just days before Jadhav was sentenced. According to Indian media reports, the two cases are linked. Such incidents are not surprising in India-Pakistan relations. What does surprise, however, is the scope of debate on this issue in India.

    Unlike the 1999 Kargil conflict and the 2008 Mumbai attacks, which raised questions about the purpose and efficacy of India’s intelligence community, this time most discussion is focused on the diplomatic, legal, and political aspects of the case. Indian officials and Prime Minister Narendra Modi have made aggressive statements regarding Pakistan’s internal troubles, insinuating a new phase of intense covert warfare.

    The binaries
    These statements raise questions about the role of the R&AW in foreign policymaking processes, and the relationship between India’s intelligence community and its political class. Lacking parliamentary oversight and reporting directly to the Prime Minister’s Office, there is no systematic way to assess how R&AW ensures accountability, efficiency, and effectiveness. This lack of information risks undermining public confidence in the agency, exacerbating existing bureaucratic rivalries, and masking the fact that India’s political elites share an equal responsibility in the success or failure of external intelligence.

    Two narratives dominate popular understanding of India’s external intelligence agency.

    The first is the binary of the extremely capable versus highly dysfunctional agency. The R&AW is considered highly capable in undertaking covert operations abroad, allegedly including the promotion of unrest in Pakistan; military training to Tibetan exiles; initial support of and subsequent war with Tamil rebels in Sri Lanka; delivery of victory in the Bangladesh War of 1971; building a formidable presence in Afghanistan; and developing advanced technological intelligence capabilities.

    That R&AW can increase the cost of enmity for India’s adversaries has become an article of faith among members of India’s strategic circuit. But when incidents such as the 1999 Kargil conflict, the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, or defection of officers occur, the agency is considered dysfunctional and corrupt. This binary between offensive success and defensive failure on the one hand creates an easy and unaccountable scapegoat that remains in the shadows when India faces a crisis from outside. On the other, it assuages mass anxieties about India’s troubles such as terrorism from Pakistan and the constraints posed by an intransigent China.

    The second narrative — dovetailing with the first — is that the R&AW was defanged or under-appreciated by soft prime ministers such as Morarji Desai, Inder Kumar Gujral, and Manmohan Singh. Desai is seen as being mistrustful of R&AW, whereas Gujral and Singh are viewed as soft on China and Pakistan. Even Narasimha Rao and Atal Bihari Vajpayee used these assets to a limited extent. Only Indira and Rajiv Gandhi, and now Modi, allegedly, understood the value of offensive covert capabilities and utilise(d) them effectively. This narrative has become folklore in Indian strategic circles. It suggests that there were moments in India’s history when intelligence played little, if any, role in foreign policy decision-making. This is a flawed proposition, because offensive operations are only a small element of the role of intelligence agencies in foreign policy. The narrative thus risks reducing R&AW to a caricature of hired assassins and agent provocateurs, instead of a professional intelligence arm meant to assess and shape India’s strategic environment. At the same time, it risks branding a non-offensive approach as weak even if the former is the correct response in a given situation.

    Even if valid, the second narrative raises questions about the politicisation of India’s intelligence community as well as the impact of R&AW’s unaccountability on Indian democracy. The Emergency, for instance, was the pinnacle of the political leadership’s misuse of and public’s mistrust in the R&AW. The latter was reflected in a 1988 incident when a security guard at Palam Airport in New Delhi uncovered a cache of weapons in the baggage hold of an Air India flight from Kabul. Allegedly whisked away by an intelligence officer before airport security could investigate, these weapons were found with Khalistani militants a few weeks later. The incident created a storm in the Parliament where opposition parties alleged that Rajiv Gandhi and R&AW were misguiding the public.

    Did the ISI infiltrate Indian and Afghan intelligence networks to such an extent that they used an Air India plane to send arms for Khalistani militants? Or was India framing Pakistan as such? Pakistan’s support to Khalistani militants more generally stands corroborated in retrospect. However, this incident underlined how little public confidence R&AW enjoyed as a result of such extreme secrecy on one hand, and why India’s neighbors are often wary of New Delhi on the other.

    The way forward
    The Jadhav-Zahir case marks a continuity rather than change in how intelligence has been understood and treated in India. Whether or not Jadhav truly is an Indian spy is immaterial. His military background and forged identity documents fit Pakistan’s profile of an Indian spy. The unspoken aspect, however, is that he also fits the image among many Indians of a capable covert operative fomenting violence in Pakistan. Modi’s statements on Balochistan, and the alleged kidnapping of Zahir, ensure that this case entrenches old narratives in public memory. The existence of such binary narratives is symptomatic of the failure to appreciate the larger purpose of intelligence as a tool of statecraft. Unlike other democracies, India has been shy to declassify intelligence dossiers, or even authorise an official history of the R&AW. A former chief of R&AW I interviewed years ago stated: “We are fine if people talk about our failures. But we don’t want our successes to become public.” True, public discussion of covert successes that may have operational implications is highly undesirable.

    However, a rising power in an increasingly complex geopolitical environment such as India urgently requires serious study of intelligence beyond operational matters. The argument that a sophisticated conceptual understanding among the public of the role of intelligence in foreign policymaking is not essential for R&AW to operate effectively overseas is erroneous. It overlooks the fact that effective overseas operations require sound structural base at home. Few civil service aspirants in India want to join R&AW today. Most officers recruited via civil service exams have poor ranks, and intake from other departments raise issues of bureaucratic politics and inconsistency in training standards. Better understanding of intelligence in foreign policymaking, and parliamentary accountability of India’s agencies are the first steps towards strengthening this base and attracting top quality recruits.

    It can also be argued that declassifying documents related to intelligence are unnecessary — so long the right people in government have access to those files, they can learn from the past. The above-mentioned case about weapons coming from Afghanistan allegedly ending up in Punjab demonstrates that political leaders may not learn from history. If the charges on this occasion were correct, we are looking at a scenario where Rajiv Gandhi used R&AW to exacerbate a conflict, which claimed his mother’s life, for immediate political gain. Clearly, leaving these issues entirely in the hands of politicians is dangerous. If ambitious prime ministers could misuse R&AW in the past, there is no guarantee it may not happen again.

    Indian intelligence practitioners are often blamed for being obsessively secretive, yet the political class is equally culpable. Worried about political legacies, few politicians want classified files to become the subject of public scrutiny. What people think about these matters may not seem important in operational terms. However, declassifying historical documents for public consumption and accepting parliamentary oversight is critical to ensure that the functioning of the agency is optimised by those in government with the power and authority to do so, and equally, for the agency to prevent itself from becoming a tool of abuse by the political leadership.

    The writer is a lecturer in diplomacy and public policy at the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. This article is by special arrangement with the Center for the Advanced Study of India, University of Pennsylvania.


    http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/opinion/public-needs-to-know-more-about-raw/article9835478.ece
     
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  14. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Pvt foundations abroad are hurting India, counter narrative urgently, IB to PMO

    [​IMG]

    The Intelligence Bureau has cautioned Prime Minister Narendra Modi and said that a narrative to malign the country is being set. The report by the IB was handed over to the PMO, National Security Advisor, Ajit Doval and the chief of the Research and Analysis Wing. The report specifically focused on the global documentation on slavery. The IB said that the document shows India as the home to the highest number of slaves in the country. A strong campaign to change the narrative and more importantly discredit the information is needed, the IB said. Recently the International Labour Organisation, Walk Free Foundation and a United Nations Agency released the "Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: Forced Labour and Forced Marriage." The IB says that the report would harm India's image and hence there is an urgent need to counter it and also discredit the information. The IB says that there are several corporations abroad which specifically fund NGOs to focus on alleged slavery in South India's textile industry. This amounts to 40 per cent of India's textile exports and such reports could damage the country's reputation. The IB wants the government to intervene and force ILO to disassociate with from WFF. The IB says that WFF is a private foundation and hence ILO should be urged to disassociate itself. Further the IB also wants a rejoinder issued to discredit the estimate stated by the WFF.

    Read more at: https://www.oneindia.com/india/pvt-foundations-abroad-are-hurting-india-counter-narrative-urgently-ib-to-pmo-2556872.html

    @PARIKRAMA @Abingdonboy @Ankit Kumar 001 @nair @vstol jockey @Gessler @randomradio @MilSpec @Robinhood Pandey @Levina @Hellfire @GuardianRED @ashkum2278 @Nilgiri @Sancho @X_Killer @Angel Eyes @lca-fan @NKVD @Blackjay @Wolfpack @sangos @stephen cohen @Lion of Rajputana

    Please use this sticky thread for intel updates
     
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  15. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Harvard studies of kumbh Mela and now this slavery report are part of compilation of atrocity literature against India. The day India is seen as a threat to West , at one push of a button all these Literature will start pouring out day in and day out.That is how West will justify,why it needed to Invade India or any other country before it starts invading.First step is character assasinnation/maligning once its over, Invasion or use of force is justified as bringing Freedom or human rights to oppressed people of that maligned country. USA brought Freedom and Democracy to Iraq,Libya,Afghanistan and many more countries around the world and you know what those countries fate was after USA left and Democracy came.
    Pakistan is still in good books because USA wants it to use its Islamic nation idea to appeal to Islamic world and manipulate it.India doesn't have that luxury since its Hindu and pagan in eyes of Judeo-Christians of West,simply put there is no market appeal for Pagans of India around the world.This is happening right now when India is in the good books of West as a Democracy etc. Think how bad it will be once India is perceived as a threat to Western hegemony.
    As i said, after China we are next on the list.
     
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