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ISRO launches GSLV Mk III carrying unmanned crew module

Discussion in 'Education & Research' started by AKIIN, Dec 18, 2014.

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  1. AKIIN

    AKIIN 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    ISRO launches GSLV Mk III carrying unmanned crew module
    [​IMG]

    India on Thursday successfully launched its latest generation vehicle GSLV Mk III, also carrying the 'Crew Module Atmospheric Re-entry Experiment (CARE) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikota.
    As per the plan, the GSLV Mark III was blast off at 9:30.

    While the rocket cost ISRO Rs 140 crore, the crew module has taken another Rs 15 crore.

    The 630-tonne GSLV-Mk III would carry the 3.65 tonne crew module even as the national space agency is equipping itself for its plan of sending astronauts into space eventually.

    The Indian government has not approved any human mission to space presently.

    Realisation of 42.4 metre tall GSLV Mk-III would help ISRO place heavier satellites into orbit.

    "The entire exercise would be completed in around 20 to 30 minutes from lift-off in Sriharikota to splashing in the Bay of Bengal," the official said.

    GSLV Mk III is conceived and designed to make ISRO fully self-reliant in launching heavier communication satellites of INSAT-4 class, which weigh 4,500 to 5,000 kg. It would also enhance India's capability to be a competitive player in the multi-million dollar commercial launch market.
     
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  2. AKIIN

    AKIIN 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    ISRO: LVM3 X / CARE Mission Update: CARE module in its tense atmospheric re-entry.

    ISRO: LVM3 X / CARE Mission Update: CARE module separated and started its descent.

    ISRO: LVM3 X / CARE Mission Update: Heat shield separated successfully.

    ISRO: LVM3 X / CARE Mission Update: L110 stage separated.

    ISRO: LVM3 X / CARE Mission Update: L110 stage performance normal.

    ISRO: LVM3 X / CARE Mission Update: S200 stage performance normal.

    ISRO: LVM3 X / CARE Mission Update: Lift off normal.

    India launches GSLV Mark-III, its largest rocket

    The CREW module would be separated from the rocket about 325.52 seconds after the lift-off at 126.16 km altitude. The specially made parachutes would help the module ‘soft-crash’ in the Bay of Bengal, some few hundred km from Indira Point in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, which would later be fetched by Indian Coast Guard ships.

    As per the plan, soon after the lift-off at Sriharikota, ISRO would study the flight validation of the complex atmospheric flight regime of LVM 3 and would also test the ability of the CREW module to re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere with thermal resistance, parachute deployment in cluster formation, aero braking system and apex cover separation procedures.

    Earlier story by our correspondent G. Ravikiran:

    All arrangements have been made for the launch of the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) Mark-III from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) at Sriharikota on Thursday at 9.30 a.m.

    It is going to be an experimental launch for the Crew Module Atmospheric Re-entry Experiment (CARE), an unmanned crew module which is aimed at testing the effectiveness of the module to re-enter the earth’s atmosphere.

    The Rs. 155-crore mission would involve the use of GSLV rocket as tall as 42.4 metres and having a lift-off mass of 630 tonnes. One of the objectives of this heavy rocket is to achieve India’s self-reliance in commercial launches market in the world as well.

    The 24-hour-and-half countdown for the GSLV Mk-III launch began at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, with the space scientists drawn from different centres of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) making combined efforts at the Sriharikota space centre. Earlier, Dr. K. Radhakrishnan, Chairman, ISRO, visited the space centre and reviewed the progress of the mission.

    Within hours of the countdown, the filling of the propellants in the second stage of the rocket were completed at 1 p.m. The scientists said that the mission was progressing satisfactorily.

    The key feature of this CARE mission is to recover the unmanned module, which is set to separate from the rocket after 325.52 seconds of the flight at an altitude of 126.16 kms. The module would then be crashed into the Bay of Bengal a few hundred kilometres from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The Indian Coast Guard made arrangements for the recovery of the module from the sea waters.
     
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  3. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    'Successful launch of GSLV Mark III is yet another triumph of brilliance and hardwork of our scientists, congrats to them', says PM Modi
     
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  4. AKIIN

    AKIIN 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Here are 10 facts about the mission:
    1. The rocket, launched from Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, is 42.4 meters tall and costs about Rs. 160 crore.
    2. The rocket is capable of doubling the capacity of payloads India can carry into space. It can carry four tonne communication satellites. Once ISRO masters this rocket, India won't need expensive foreign launchers to send its heavy-duty communication satellites to space.
    3. On this flight, the rocket is being tested on how it performs while traveling in the atmosphere. Its first two stages are active rocket engines and the third stage, which consists of the cryogenic engine, is passive.
    4. The heavy-duty cryogenic engine necessary for this rocket is still being developed by ISRO. A full-fledged launch of the rocket can be expected in a few years.
    5. The GSLV Mk III is a new rocket design and marks the beginning of what could be India's initiation into the ambitious human space flight programme. Its main passenger is an Indian-made crew module.
    6. The crew module is unmanned but the small room-sized cupcake-shaped satellite is capable of carrying two or three astronauts into space.
    7. The crew module, powered by its own engine, was navigated and made to re-enter the atmosphere at a massive velocity. It was slowed down with massive parachutes, the largest ever to be used by India, before it splashed down in the Bay of Bengal.
    8. ISRO has said it can fly astronauts to space using a made-in-India rocket within seven to eight years of getting the government's clearance for its astronaut programme.
    9. The space agency has sought around Rs. 12,500 cr for its human space flight mission. When it happens, India will become the fourth country in the world to have the technology of sending humans into space.
    10. Russia, the US and China are the only nations to have the technology for this complex mission.
     
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  5. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    4th country?

    Aren't we forgetting ESA?

    Consists of many countries
     
  6. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  7. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Live coverage: All-new Indian rocket set for maiden flight
    Posted on December 18, 2014 by Stephen Clark

    0413 GMT (11:13 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    The capsule is now descending under its main parachute, according to ISRO. Splashdown is targeted about 1,000 miles downrange from the launch site, or nearly 400 miles from Port Blair in the Andaman Islands.
    0410 GMT (11:10 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    The CARE module has started its parachute deployment sequence, ISRO says, indicating it has survived the period of peak heating.
    0408 GMT (11:08 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T+plus 8 minutes. The CARE crew module, fitted with thrusters to control the first phase of its descent, has started its re-entry sequence. It carries a heat shield to protect it from temperatures of near 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit.
    0405 GMT (11:05 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T+plus 5 minutes, 45 seconds. ISRO says the Vikas engines have shut down and the L110 first stage has separated. And the CARE prototype crew module has been released for its descent back to Earth.
    0404 GMT (11:04 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T+plus 4 minutes. The L110 core stage is performing as expected.
    0402 GMT (11:02 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T+plus 2 minutes, 40 seconds. Both solid rocket boosters have separated as planned, ISRO says.
    0402 GMT (11:02 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T+plus 2 minutes. The twin Vikas engines on the core stage have ignited.
    0401 GMT (11:01 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T+plus 60 seconds. With twin boosters producing 2 million pounds of thrust, the 14-story rocket has broken the speed of sound and is flying southeast from Sriharikota on a flight azimuth of 120 degrees.
    0400 GMT (11:00 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    Liftoff of the GSLV Mk. 3, India's biggest-ever rocket!
    0359 GMT (10:59 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 60 seconds and counting. The rocket's self-destruct system, ignition systems and separation charges are being armed for liftoff. The launch pad's water system will be activated in the final seconds before launch to suppress acoustic energy from ignition of the rocket's two large solid rocket boosters.
    0357 GMT (10:57 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 3 minutes and counting. Pyrotechnic batteries have been activated, and on-board computers are in flight mode.
    0355 GMT (10:55 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 5 minutes and counting. The final flight program has been loaded into the GSLV Mk. 3 rocket, and systems have been transitioned to internal battery power.
    0352 GMT (10:52 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 8 minutes and counting. Data recorders are being activated now.
    0351 GMT (10:51 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 9 minutes and counting. The dummy cryogenic stage is configured for liftoff, and the automated countdown sequence is underway.
    0350 GMT (10:50 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 10 minutes and counting. The automated countdown sequence begins soon.
    0349 GMT (10:49 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    "The launch operation sequence of the LVM-3X/CARE mission is authorized," says the mission director.
    0348 GMT (10:48 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 12 minutes and counting. The CARE module is reported ready for liftoff.
    0347 GMT (10:47 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 13 minutes and counting. The flight of the GSLV Mk. 3 and the CARE landing capsule will take about 19 minutes from liftoff from India's east coast to splashdown near the Andaman Islands. The vehicle will reach a top speed of nearly 12,000 mph and a peak altitude of 78 miles.
    0346 GMT (10:46 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 14 minutes and counting. Ground facilities are reported ready for liftoff.
    0345 GMT (10:45 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 15 minutes and counting. The GSLV Mk. 3 vehicle director confirms the launcher is ready for today's test flight.
    0340 GMT (10:40 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 20 minutes and counting. There are no problems reported in the countdown as the GSLV Mk. 3 launch team goes through their preflight checklist. The rocket is already full of propellant, with pre-packed solid fuel in the strap-on boosters, hypergolic propellant in the two-engine core, and gaseous nitrogen pumped aboard the dummy upper stage to simulate tanks full of cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to be used on future missions.
    0330 GMT (10:30 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    T-minus 30 minutes and counting. The ISRO webcast is beginning now.
    0300 GMT (10:00 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    One hour until launch. The official ISRO webcast of the countdown and liftoff begins in about 30 minutes.
    0200 GMT (9:00 p.m. EST on Wed.)
    Two hours until launch.
    The GSLV Mk. 3 rocket -- also called the LVM-3 -- is fueled for liftoff at 0400 GMT Thursday (11 p.m. EST Wednesday) from the Second Launch Pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Center on Sriharikota Island along India's east coast.

    The launch vehicle is an all-new design with powerful solid rocket boosters and a core stage powered by two Vikas engines. The boosters are the second-most powerful solid rocket motors in operation after the strap-on rockets flying on Europe's Ariane 5 rocket.

    The Vikas engines on the rocket's L110 core stage burn hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants.

    The rocket's twin strap-on S200 solid rocket boosters will fire at liftoff to propel the 630-metric ton (695-ton) launcher away from the space center. It will fly southeast from the launch site, passing the speed of sound in less than a minute as the boosters ramp up to more than 2 million pounds of total thrust.

    The GSLV Mk. 3's liquid-fueled Vikas engines will ignite at T+plus 1 minute, 55 seconds at an altitude of nearly 27 miles (43 kilometers). The S200 solid rocket boosters will consume their pre-packed propellant a few seconds later before jettisoning from the launcher at T+plus 2 minutes, 29 seconds.

    The rocket's 5-meter (16.4-foot) diameter payload fairing will separate at an altitude of 114 kilometers (71 miles) at T+plus 3 minutes, 52 seconds. The liquid-fueled core stage will switch off at T+plus 5 minutes, 17 seconds after reaching a top speed of nearly 12,000 mph (about 5.3 kilometers per second).

    Three seconds later, the first stage will release from the GSLV Mk. 3's upper stage, which is flying in an inactive configuration on today's launch. On future missions, the stage will have an engine fueled by super-cold liquid hydrogen to send satellites into orbit.

    The passenger on today's mission -- an 8,000-pound landing craft -- will separate from the launch vehicle at T+plus 5 minutes, 25 seconds.

    The Crew Module Atmospheric Re-entry Experiment, or CARE, will descend back to Earth from a peak altitude of 78 miles (126 kilometers). After its heat shield weathers temperatures near 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, the spacecraft will deploy a series of parachutes to slow it down before splashdown in the Bay of Bengal nearly 1,000 miles downrange from the launch site.

    A 100-foot-diameter main parachute will unfurl to slow down the capsule before it hits the ocean about 19 minutes after liftoff. The Indian Coast Guard will recover the craft and return to land for inspections.

    WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2014
    Indian engineers are counting down to a test flight Thursday of a next-generation launcher to verify the performance of two powerful solid rocket motors, a twin-engine core booster and a prototype capsule designed for India's nascent human spaceflight program.
    Read our full story.
     
  8. AKIIN

    AKIIN 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    may be ESA not in that list because they helped by the US NASA to launch heavy satellite.
     
  9. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    Nope...ESA's tech is almost 100% home-grown. The reason why ESA is left out in most country-based lists is because it is not
    fully done by one country - but by many countries of the European Union. But still it's not logically correct...even if you leave out ESA,
    you must definitely include Arianespace, which is a complete French company, and the one responsible for making the rockets of
    ESA.

    NASA, Roscosmos, Arianespace, CNSA, JAXA have all done rockets like these - far bigger ones - long ago. We would be the 6th entity after
    USA, Russia, France, China, and Japan.
     
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  10. AKIIN

    AKIIN 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Japan and ESA will developed project and also satellite lunch vehicle with collaboration with US NASA this all known fact.
     
  11. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    All that matters is that we will have a heavy lift rocket for manned spaceflight(with C 25 of course) in 2 years. Previously we had trampolines like a 'superpower' today.:troll:
     
  12. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    They're just as indigenous to their countries as the GSLV is to us. Disagreeing with the writing on the wall doesn't discredit
    their achievements. It's also a fact that France, Japan had developed cryogenic engines much before India. But yeah, unlike us
    they were not under sanctions and managed to receive tech & support from other Western countries. Even China had the chance
    to study and license-built Russian cryogenics before coming up with their own design...but we unfortunately had to do it alone
    and from scratch partly due to sanctions and partly due to pressure of West on Russia not to proliferate its tech in cryogenic
    propulsion.

    This is where our achievement lies. But it for sure can't be ignored that those countries did indeed acquire these technologies much
    before we did.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2014
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  13. m2monty

    m2monty Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Stop fighting !!
    Can we enjoy this achievement ...??
    I am happy..:dance3::dance3::dance3::rockroll::rockroll::rockroll::taz::taz::tribaldance::india::india::india:
     
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  14. turkish

    turkish Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    OHHHHH!! I was waiting for this for a lonnnnng time.... Love you India!!
     
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  15. GUNS-N- ROSES

    GUNS-N- ROSES Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    massive success for ISRO. cheers. made my day
     
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