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ISRO News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Education & Research' started by Varad, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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    :lol:

    The French had been supportive of our space program since decades. We have acknowledged the same & the founder of CNES, Jacques Blamont received Padma Shri for the same reason.
     
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  2. SrNair

    SrNair Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Next important development is integration of SCE 200 to Mk3 for performance testing.
    Will pump up the GTO capacity to 6 Tonne .By 2020 the strap ones also will convert to SCE 200 semi cryogenics .
    Means GTO capacity would be 15 Tonne
     
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  3. SrNair

    SrNair Captain FULL MEMBER

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    There was a hint that further optimization will increase the capacity of MK 3 again 50%.
    What do they meant by it?
     
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  4. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Story of the Week
    Enhanced use of Space based Applications in Governance and Development- Madhya Pradesh

    For full proceeding of M P State Meet, click here.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Story of the Week - Archive
    Jun 05, 2017 : Enhanced use of Space based Applications in Governance and Development- Madhya Pradesh
    May 22, 2017 : National Database for Emergency Management (NDEM) Version 3.0 Released
    May 15, 2017 : Observing Reservoir and River Water Levels from Satellite Altimetry
    May 08, 2017 : NARL MST Radar Observations Help Resolve Ionospheric Echoing Riddle
    Apr 24, 2017 : ISRO Develops "Solar Calculator" Android App
    Apr 17, 2017 : Satish Dhawan Wind Tunnel Complex Commissioned at VSSC
    Apr 10, 2017 : ISRO Organises Smart India Hackathon-2017 Grand Finale
     
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  5. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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    I am yet to watch the video of the press conference, so I am assuming they don't mean the ULV.

    According to Dr. Kasturirangan, the GTO payload of LVM3 is 4.5 tonnes. The present capabilities can be stretched by 1) reducing the inert mass of upper stage & increasing the propellent loading- already being done 2) uprating & down rating thrust of the CE 20 engine within the limits. 3) adopting a two burn cycle for upper stage -with shutting off the cryo engine and going on a coast phase & then restarting it again

    Also, the lower stage performance can be improved by using 'high thrust vikas' engine, which provides higher specific impulse due to higher chamber pressure.

    They did the same for PSLV, almost doubling the SSO payload, so they'll definitely improvise on this one.

    From ISRO's official publication, 'From Fishing Hamlet to the Red Planet', quoting S Ramakrishnan, the first project director of GSLV Mk- III.

     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2017
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  6. SrNair

    SrNair Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Still it demands a semi cryogenic engines to increase it upto 6 +tonne.
     
  7. SrNair

    SrNair Captain FULL MEMBER

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    A bit off topic .
    But world had alse witnessed some feat like this


    Had the yesterday launch been a failure ,our Mangalyaan 2 ,Chandrayaan 2 etc would have been faced at least 5 years back lash .
    Now we are on right schedule.
     
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  8. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    ISRO is on fire(and the private sector). Great time for aerospace companies.

     
  9. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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    According to present VSSC director K Sivan, it can go up to 7+ tonnes.
     
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  10. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    http://indico.vecc.gov.in/indico/contributionDisplay.py?contribId=72&sessionId=13&confId=44
    Design and analysis of Methane pump

    Content: In rocket propulsion weight has a vital role on efficiency and cost of the program. Since fuel, oxidizer and delivery system contribute a major share of the total weight; so it is desirable to design an efficient fuel delivery system as well as choice of fuel. Methane has been chosen as the next generation cryogenic fluid for its certain advantages over liquid hydrogen and kerosene. Pump-fed system is a well-established preferable fuel delivery system as compared to pressure-fed system. Pump-fed system is commonly known as turbo-pump system; as it consists of turbine and pump. Pump gives the necessary pressure rise to the fuel and oxidizer while turbine acts as the prime-mover. The present work is limited to design and analysis of the pump part alone. Although pump-fed system has been successfully designed for various propellants, but the research is limited and new for methane as working fluid. Centrifugal pump is preferable to other kind of pumps because of its compact size and a wider throttling range. However, an inducer is necessary before impeller to meet the NPSH requirement of the pump. The focus of the work is to determine the throttling range of the system for operating.
    Summary: Methane is a soft cryogen and hugely available in other planets. For inter-planetary motion if methane is used as fuel, it is possible to refill fuel at the destination point. Thus additional fuel storage for returning of the vehicle can be avoided. Further Methane is eco-friendly fuel and have acceptable specific impulse. A turbo-pump assembly is a pump powered by a turbine used to raise the fuel and oxidizer pressure. This eliminates necessity of high tank pressure and thereby thickness of tank chamber. Study is carried out to analyse of the fluid flow through the pump.

    Next gen cryogen based on Methane?
    Anyway, thanks NSF.
     
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  11. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    SPADEX (Space Docking Experiment) Update

    [​IMG]


    The Department of Space has granted a space project worth Rs 10 crore under which Indian Space Research Organisation(ISRO) will be able to refuel spacecrafts so that they can have a longer life. It will also help in transferring other crucial systems to spacecraft in orbit.

    According to a report by The Times of India, the technology will eventually help in transferring humans to the space stations and bring them back. It will allow two space vehicles to attach in orbit and also transfer material between them. The terms used for the technology are spacecraft docking and berthing. Speaking to the newspaper, senior scientist T K Anuradha confirmed that experiments to this end were under way at the Isro Space Application Centre (Isac), Bengaluru, in 2016. Some ground simulation have already been completed by ISRO. Another senior scientist said, "The plan is to launch two small spacecraft to test the technology in space. India operates a huge constellation of satellites and this technology will allow Isro to enhance their lives by refueling them. It'll also reduce space debris."

    [​IMG]

    However, there will be some challenges like managing the speed of the spacecrafts while docking.

    Earlier in February, ISRO scripted history by successfully launching 104 satellites, including India's weather observation Cartosat-2 Series, in a single mission onboard its dependable Polar rocket. Bettering Russian space agency's feat of launching 37 satellites in a single mission in 2014, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) injected the Cartosat-2 Series satellite and 103 nano satellites into precise orbit after a textbook lift-off from this spaceport, about 100 km from Chennai.

    http://www.outlookindia.com/website...refuel-spacecrafts-and-transfer-humans/298719
     
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  12. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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    THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: After the historic launch of the 640 ton, first developmental flight of Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) -Mark III (D1) on June 5, the team of scientists from Isro centres here have set their target to launch its second developmental flight GSLV-Mark III -D2 by Jan 2018 with more payload and higher thrust. Ahead of that, two more GSLV launches and three more PSLV launches are planned including the latest PSLV -C38 on June 28.

    "The second developmental flight of GSLV-Mk III D2 launch planned in Jan 2018 will have a lift off mass more than 640 ton. Improvisation in vehicle systems is targeted to achieve 500kg more payload than in the D1 launch. The liquid propellant L110 stage will operate at 6 per cent extra thrust throughout the flight duration in the upcoming D2 launch, compared to D1," GSLV MK III Vehicle director J Jayaprakash told TOI.

    On the upcoming launches, he said "Before Jan 2018, we are targeting two more GSLVs and three more PSLV launches including the PSLV-C38 planned on June 28".

    Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) director S Somnath told TOI that the GSV MKIII D1 launch with its human-rated benign features was equipped with a fully indigenous cryogenic engine of 20 ton thrust with 28 ton propellant loading. The cryogenic engine used in this launch has 2.5 times more thrust than the previous cryogenic engine with 12 ton thrust (wrong, it's 7.5 tonnes) . In the second development flight of GSLV -MK III D2, the systems will be improvised further with higher thrust. (I guess he meant higher propellant loading)

    GSLV mission director G Ayyappan had indicated that the GSLV-Mk III D1 flight placed a 3.2 ton satellite in orbit while the same vehicle with modular changes can carry satellites of six tons. He pointed out that it is the success of "Make in India' space project with its fully indigenous launch with cryogenic technology and in terms of the material and design. It unique features include the dual redundancy, health monitoring, fault detection and isolation system, so the next flight will be improvised further, he said.

    Isro sets focus on PSLV-C38 launch by June 28
     
  13. Blackjay

    Blackjay Developers Guild IDF NewBie

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    Could be easily weaponised in my IMVHO.What is stopping the attaching vehicle from disabling/destroying the satellite instead of refuelling it.
    Could we track a satellite from any other country precisely enough using ISRO ground stations to guide our vehicle within range?
     
  14. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Isro: How calculated risks have translated into more frequent and sophisticated launches

    [​IMG]


    Employees at the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) do not open champagne bottles to celebrate success. As soon as a rocket launch is over, they go back to their offices and start working on the next launch. About two years ago, Isro decided that this practice was not good enough. No, they weren’t yearning for the bubbly. Rather, the organisation was keen to begin assembling the next rocket well before a specific launch was over. So, it created teams and processes to that end.

    The successful launch of the Geostationary Launch Vehicle (GSLV) Mark III on Monday was a major milestone in Isro’s five-decade history. A similar success would have resulted in celebrations in some space agencies around the world. But, on Tuesday morning, employees at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (Shar) in Sriharikota were back to working on the half-assembled Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) C-39, which will soon be assembled fully and launched on June 23. “Earlier the entire Shar used to concentrate on one mission,” says director P Kunhikrishnan. “Now we work in parallel to increase the throughput.”

    By the end of this month, Isro would have made four rocket launches this year itself. Two of them were technically challenging, one being GSLV Mark III and the other the launch of 104 satellites on one rocket. By the month-end, Isro would also have built four satellites this year. They include the Gsat-19, a sophisticated satellite with high throughput that is expected to improve communication significantly in the country. It was put into orbit on Monday by the GSLV Mark III.

    Even a casual observer would have noticed that the frequency of Isro’s missions has been increasing in recent times. Isro is also tackling missions of increasing sophistication, and slowly reducing the gap between India and the other space powers. Early next year, Isro will launch its second lunar mission, consisting of an orbiter, lander and rover.

    If the government gives its approval, Isro will also begin work on a human mission sometime soon. With two different rockets and a third to be available soon, Isro will have an increasing presence in the global commercial market. When current chairman Kiran Kumar took over two and a half years ago, Isro was in good shape from a technical perspective.

    The Mars mission had been accomplished and the GSLV, a thorn in Isro’s flesh for a long time, had been successfully flown. A cryogenic engine had been developed, and a human crew capsule tested by atmospheric re-entry. Through all these, the PSLV had been launching satellites with exquisite precision.

    This was not always the case, as Isro went through a difficult phase about seven years ago. A GSLV launch failed and a cryogenic engine shut off prematurely. Another mission was aborted due to a fuel leak. “When you encounter difficulties,” says Kiran Kumar, “the concentration of the people goes towards solving those problems. But, once these problems are solved, the concentration is on how we can make things happen at a faster pace.”

    The technical problems had delayed Isro’s programmes significantly. The GSLV should have been ready by 2009, but its first successful flight was only in 2014. The cryogenic engine should have been ready early in the millennium, but it was successfully flown only in 2014. Even the PSLV had a backlog. The government was aware of the problems, but continued to support the organization.

    Soon after he took over, Kumar reengineered Isro to work faster. The senior management sat down and identified the bottlenecks. They strengthened the technical review system. They also optimized procurement and methods of testing. Separate divisions were created to deal with operations and R&D.

    Projects were done in parallel. “The chairman asked us to push ourselves to the limit,” says S Somanath, director of the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) in Thiruvananthapuram. The results were evident soon. The launches increased in frequency.

    The backlog of satellites and launches has decreased, but national requirements are so large that Isro will be kept busy for a long time. The commercial opportunities are also not insignificant. “There is a shortage of launchers, whether it is higher capacity of lower capacity,” says Kumar. Isro, especially in the current high-speed environment, has the ability to respond quickly to market needs.

    With PSLV launches increasing in frequency, satellite builders get opportunities for launch with low turnaround time. Isro’s launch costs also go down. None of these would have been possible if the technical problems had been left unsolved. In its nine-year history, GSLV Mark I and II together had notched five failures till December 2010. After Mark I failed in December 2010, Isro took two years before trying the next launch. In August 2013, GSLV Mark II flight was aborted due to a fuel leak. These failures delayed GSLV Mark III as well, as its facilities were used for Mark II for some time.

    Isro subsequently did such thorough analysis of the GSLV that some of its engineers had said that they would not have known what to do if it had failed again in 2014. Its successful flight in January 2014 was a major turnaround for Isro. The preceding years were the period when Isro engineers mastered several technology areas, including the cryogenic engine, and developed confidence to take more risks. It also grabbed world attention through the mars mission. “Two successful GSLV launches showed that whatever we worked out was successful,” says Kumar. “Technology is no longer an issue.” He could look at more challenging problems from 2015 onwards.

    Isro now became very serious about adhering to the fixed launch date. Launch dates became sacrosanct. Only a newly-formed project management council had the right to change a launch date, and that too when done well in advance. Once Isro became serious about not changing the launch date, work culture changed for the better. People picked up speed. “In the aerospace sector, there is a belief that we should not hurry,” says Somanath. “But we can do faster. By doing things faster, nothing bad is going to happen.”

    Isro then looked at its testing methods and decided to optimise them. Launch vehicle components were being tested in Thiruvanathapuram, transported to the launch centre at Sriharikota and then tested again. Isro decided to test them only at Sriharikota, thereby saving time. “We took a calculated risk,” says K Sivan, director of the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre in Thiruvananthapuram.

    If the components were found to be faulty during tests at Shar, Isro would have lost more time. However, engineers at VSSC by now have the confidence in their skills to take this risk. The biggest changes were reserved for Shar, which got big investments to create new facilities. Shar also started activities in parallel. It had built a solid stage assembly building, exclusively meant for GSLV Mark III.


    This rocket had big solid motors – the third largest in the world – that could not be made by industry, and needed these special facilities for assembly. Isro also decided that the assembly building would be used for PSLV assembly as well. When the solid stage assembly building was being used for multiple vehicles, two vehicles could be assembled in parallel. Earlier the practice was to launch a rocket, clean up and repair the launch pad in about three weeks, and then start the new assembly. Now vehicles are assembled in parallel without affecting each other. Shar is building a third vehicle assembly bay that will be ready by the end of the year, and it will increase the efficiency even more.

    Isro has two launch pads. From the first pad, it can launch six PSLVs. When the third assembly bay is ready, the throughput from the second launch pad will increase to ten, or probably 12 when teams are stretched fully. It means that Isro can have 18 launches from next year onwards.


    Its launch capacity will remain at this level till it builds a third launch pad. Isro now has an extremely reliable vehicle in PSLV, which is being used by many satellite builders for launch. GSLV Mark II is now operational, and so Isro has a second vehicle for commercial launches. GSLV Mark III will be declared operational after one more flight, scheduled to happen after a year. It can launch satellites of up to 4,000 kg in weight.

    As Isro developed more powerful launch vehicles, the weight of communication satellites kept going up. However, electric propulsion in satellites is promising to bring down their weight in the near future. So the GSLV Mark III will enter a lucrative commercial market soon. Big rockets are not optimized to launch 4-5-tonne satellites.

    Arianespace, whose Ariane 5 rocket can launch payloads of more than ten tonnes, is now developing Ariane 6 for launching satellites of around five tonnes. So the two GSLV vehicles are addressing a market that may not go away soon. “I am confident that the GSLV Mark III will have a long life,” says K Radhakrishnan, former chairman of Isro.

    Over the next few years, Isro is planning to start a joint venture with private industry to launch vehicles and make satellites. Isro itself is going to concentrate on future challenges, leaving the routine jobs to the joint venture. This entity is expected to start work by 2021. Isro’s biggest challenge after that will be to take humans to space.
     
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  15. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    Proper docking won't be possible until the docking protocols are known & shared by both the satellites involved. Hijacking a foreign satellite by force presents more challenges and complications.

    I heard the Chinese were attempting a similar type of ASAT weapon as you have described - don't know where they got with that.

    Given enough resources and tech - I don't see why something like that should be impossible...however I'd think it would be much easier to have a robotic arm extending from your satellite throw the enemy satellite out of orbit.
     
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