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ISRO News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Education & Research' started by Varad, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    Some space news/updates from recent times...

    Mars Orbiter Completes Three Years in Orbit; ISRO Conducts Science Meet

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    Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), the maiden interplanetary mission of ISRO, launched on November 5, 2013, was successfully inserted into Martian orbit on September 24, 2014 in its first attempt. MOM completed three years as on September 24, 2017, though the designed mission life of MOM was six months. The Satellite is in good health and continues to work as expected. Scientific analysis of the data, which is being received from the Mars Orbiter spacecraft, is in progress.

    On the occasion of three years completion of MOM in Martian orbit on September 24, 2017, Space Science Programme Office, ISRO Hqs conducted a ‘MOM Science Meet’ on September 25, 2017.

    The following distinguished scientists graced the occasion:
    1. Dr.K.Radhakrishnan, Honorary Adviser, ISRO and former Chairman of ISRO and Secretary DOS was guest of honour for this occassion
    2. Dr.M.Annadurai, Director, ISAC inaugurated the Meet and
    3. Dr. P.G. Diwakar, Scientific Secretary, ISRO initiated with introductory remarks
    Prof. U.R.Rao was specially remembered with gratitude for his precious contribution to Indian Space Programme in general and to the MOM in particular.

    Dr. P.G. Diwakar, Scientific Secretary in his introductory remarks told that MOM has changed the face of ISRO and brought a lot of reputation within and outside the country. Thirty two proposals were selected under MOM Announcement of opportunity (MOM-AO) and funding support was extended to twenty eight proposals. He said that, MOM first year data was released on September 24, 2016 and about 7 lakhs hits of which about 1500 users have already registered and downloaded about 400 GB data. He also mentioned that more scientific outcome is expected from MOM.

    Dr. M. Annadurai, Director of ISRO Satellite Centre inaugurated the Science Meet. During inaugural address, he mentioned that MOM was accomplished in a record time. MOM has enthused the young generation and they will remember it as an epic mission. He also stressed the need to have a future Mars mission focussing more on science.

    Dr. K. Radhakrishnan, Honorary Advisor to ISRO and former Chairman of ISRO, released the second year data of MOM (Sept 24, 2015 to Sept 23, 2016) to public through ISSDC website. Dr. K. Radhakrishnan during his address mentioned that there is an overwhelming response from the Indian planetary science community to the MOM-AO and it resulted in the formation of 32 research teams within the country. He also appreciated the efforts of MOM mission operation team, spacecraft teams and team of scientific instruments. He also highlighted that MOM kindled everyone in the country and we need more focus to publicise the science outputs from the mission to public.

    He also mentioned that ISRO’s planetary missions are on the Global Exploration Roadmap. It is now time for the teams to brainstorm and come up with ideas which can be realised in 10-15 years and which will remain important for 10 years after that. These could cover areas like habitation of Moon, Mars, sample collection, reusable re-entry vehicles for cargo and resource utilisation of other planetary bodies.

    Dr. Radhakrishnan also stressed the need to prepare a roadmap for the future planetary exploration and also for space exploitation. Further sessions included science presentation from five payload teams and twenty nine MOM-AO project teams. About 100 participants attended in the Science Meet.

    On the occasion of three year completion of MOM, second year data (Sep 24, 2015 to Sep 23, 2016) consisting of 492 data products was made available to the public through ISRO-ISSDC website https://mrbrowse.issdc.gov.in/MOMLTA

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    AstroSat Picture of the Month - Sep 2017
    WLM: Forming stars efficiently in grand isolation


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    Dwarf Galaxy WLM

    Located in the constellation Cetus, 3 million light years away, is a faint dwarf galaxy, Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte, or WLM for short. It is relatively isolated, lying in the outskirts of our Local Group of Galaxies. It has a mass that is thousands of times less than the Milky Way and a metallicity that is only 13% solar. Lower metallicity implies less heavier elements, which in turn hinders forming new stars. So why did AstroSat even look at this galaxy? WLM is a dwarf irregular galaxy with a low mass and metallicity and exists in solitude. Nevertheless, it manages to form new stars extremely efficiently. Adjusted for their respective masses, WLM forms stars at a rate that is 12 times higher than our own Milky Way! Astronomers are still not sure as to how WLM does this. Annapurni Subramaniam and her student Chayan Mondal at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bengaluru wanted to understand how this diminutive galaxy is such an efficient star factory. They decided to use the Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope on board the AstroSat to image the younger star clusters in WLM. In this image, the blue dots are the star clusters imaged in Far Ultra-Violet (130-180 nm) and the yellow dots are those imaged in Near Ultra-Violet (180-300 nm). They are currently analysing this data and will soon be able to fit one more piece into the puzzle that is WLM.

    Info: AstroSat, India's first dedicated multi-wavelength space observatory, was launched by ISRO on 28 Sep 2015. It has five intruments on board - the Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope, the Soft X-ray Telescope, the Large Area X-ray Proportional Counter, the Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Imager and the Scanning Sky Monitor.

    "AstroSat Picture of the Month" is an initiative of the Public Outreach and Education Committee of the Astronomical Society of India and AstroSat Training and Outreach Team.

    http://astron-soc.in/outreach/

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    ISRO Mars Atlas Download

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    The Atlas imagery was compiled after the first year in orbit: https://www.issdc.gov.in/docs/mr1/Mars-atlas-MOM.pdf

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    India Joins World's Experts to Design the Largest Radio-Telescope on Earth (Square Kilometer Array)
    This news is years old, but the start of Phase-I construction is scheduled for 2018 so posting it now. We never covered it on the forum IMO anyway

    @randomradio should be interested. :biggthumpup:

    (Artist impressions)
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    India has formally initiated work towards the design of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the world’s largest and most sensitive radio telescope. This telescope is an international project, and will be co-located in radio quiet regions of South Africa and Australia. The SKA Project is now entering an era where the teams responsible for design of the various parts of the telescope have been identified, and they are all set to start the work. . In total, more than three hundred and fifty scientists and engineers, representing 18 nations and drawn from nearly one hundred institutions, universities and industry have the challenging task to work on the critical detailed design phase which will usher in the most sensitive and powerful telescope ever devised. This design phase will last for 3 years, and lead directly to construction of Phase I of the SKA, starting in 2017.

    The Telescope Manager (TM) for SKA will be designed by an international consortium, led by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA-TIFR) in Pune, India. Of the 10 different components of the SKA, the Telescope Manager is a crucial element, and will perform the task of sending control commands to various subsystems, ensure successful astronomical observations, cooordinate between the various SKA components and the users, continuously monitor the status of the telescopes as well as ensure safety. NCRA-TIFR will draw upon its experience in building, operating and maintaining the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT, Khodad, Maharashtra), the worlds largest low-frequency radio telescope, in the work for the Telescope Manger. Ongoing upgrade activities at the GMRT will also be beneficial to this work.

    NCRA has formed an international consortium under its leadership, for designing the Telescope Manager. This team includes the Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune, a research team with vast experience in monitor and control systems for larger international science projects.

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    This is a level of engagement only seen in revolutionary projects!”, said Professor Phil Diamond, Director General of the SKA Organisation to mark the formal inauguration of the design phase of the project in the first week of November 2013. “That we have been able to pull together a team of some of the world’s best experts, most prestigious institutions and major companies reflects the passion and ambition of the scientific and engineering communities to work on an inspirational world-class project of the scale of the SKA.”

    The total area of the full SKA will be roughly one square kilometre – this is 50 times the sensitivity, and 10000 times the survey speed, of the best telescopes of today. The scale of the SKA represents a huge leap forward in both engineering and research & development towards building and delivering a radio telescope, and will deliver a correspondingly transformational increase in science capability when operational. Eleven countries, including India, are currently working together for designing the SKA.

    Each consortium, including the Telescope Manager, has already provided the SKA Organisation with detailed management and verification plans, schedules, milestones and budgets for the various elements with which they have been tasked. The SKA Organisation, which is coordinating this global effort, will oversee the work done by the consortia and ensure that this meets critical design reviews along the way. Similar to a jigsaw puzzle, the consortia teams will be called upon to ensure that their various elements integrate and interface as seamlessly as possible.

    [​IMG]

    The TM consortium has ten international partners from 8 countries (India, South Africa, Australia, United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Italy and Portugal), all of whom will pool in their knowledge of designing and building such monitor and control systems for large telescopes in the past.

    As the leader of the Telescope Manager consortium, NCRA is organising a kick-off meeting of the entire international consortium during the week of 11-15 November . This meeting is being held at the NCRA, with 30 attendees from all of the 8 member countries, including partners from industry. The goals of this meeting are to evolve a shared vision and understanding of how to design this crucial part of the SKA, define mutual relationships and allocate responsibilities. Dr. Tim Cornwell, Head of Computing from the SKA, will also be attending this meeting.

    Immediately following this week-long meeting, the exciting phase of designing the Telescope Manager will start and the final design will be delivered to the international community in three years.

    Members of the Telescope Manager consortium are :

    • National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of FundamentalResearch, Pune, India
    • Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune, India
    • SKA South Africa, South Africa
    • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia
    • Science and Technology Facilities Council, United Kingdom
    • National Research Council of Canada, Canada
    • National Institute for Astrophysics, Italy
    • Institute for Telecommunications, Portugal
    • GTD, Germany
    [​IMG]

    For more information on the SKA Project, visit the website
    http://www.skatelescope.org

    (Telescope Manager LOGO – http://www.skatelescope.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/TMlogo.jpg)

    Artists impression of the SKA
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    @Abingdonboy @PARIKRAMA @Hellfire @Levina @Agent_47 @MilSpec @Vergennes @Picdelamirand-oil @BON PLAN @Sancho @Grevion @GuardianRED @GSLV Mk III @BMD @Zarvan @Blackjay @Bloom 17 @ranadd @sunstersun @nair
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2017
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  2. The enlightened

    The enlightened Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Its a shame they fucked up on the Methane Sensor. Would be nice if we could get some added science literature credited to ISRO.
     
  3. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    It's an achievement in of itself that the spacecraft managed to find it's way to Mars and stay functioning for 3+ years (against a designed service life of 6 months). An area where even China & Japan have failed.

    As of the Methane Sensor, it isn't fucked per se. It's problem is that is that it's data is not as accurate as ISRO intended it to be (picks up some CO2 along with Methane). Other than that it's functioning fine. I'm sure we can & will learn from this.

    MOM was our first Mars mission, not the last - we are already well into planning MOM-2. After that there will be many more.

    If you want to get everything correct without even a little trial & error, it's not going to happen so I'd advise against having unrealistic expectations....not to mention the fact ISRO has already crossed all set expectations, and then some.
     
  4. The enlightened

    The enlightened Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    There's no need to be defensive. MoM, all things considered was a brilliant success and achieved all its goals.

    Science wasn't one of them but MSM was indeed something we were looking out for and a methane discovery in Martian atmosphere would have been a massive event on par with Chandrayaan's discovery of water on moon (atmospheric methane can only be created from water or organics so......). And yet they managed to ignore what looks like a really basic principle in its design which only got found when they let NASA have a peek. I just hope there's better co-ordination between the engineering and science divisions (if any such exist) of ISRO in the future.
     
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  5. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    You talk almost as if you know the methane sensor inside out. :angel: Lol I'm pretty sure it's not as simple as you think it is mate. I wouldn't speculate further on what exactly went wrong leading to the problematic sensor.
     
  6. The enlightened

    The enlightened Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    No I don't know the sensor inside out. But at least I bothered to read before I speak :rolleyes2:

    https://www.seeker.com/india-mars-orbiter-mission-methane-detector-flaw-red-planet-2133861312.html
     
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  7. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    And you thought that because the official used a simple analogy to explain the issue, the problem with the sensor must be equally simple? :confused:
     
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  8. GuardianRED

    GuardianRED Captain FULL MEMBER

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    How does one gauge the life of a satellite? for eg MoM ?
     
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  9. The enlightened

    The enlightened Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The primary mission duration was 6 months. The equipment was designed for 10 years. The orbiter will keep orbiting as long as it has fuel or suffers from component failure or a solar storm or a martian attack w.e.earlier

    'The spacecraft is expected to circle the planet for another five years as it has still got about 15kg of fuel left.'

    http://zeenews.india.com/space/mang...1000-earth-days-in-martian-orbit-2016869.html

    Other orbiters have lasted longer obviously but our goal on our first interplanetary hop was just to get something up there. Not much science happening anyway. So it doesn't matter too much when it dies. I just hope we get some more full scale shots of Mars or its muns.

    [​IMG]

     
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  10. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    ISRO should be ballsy enough to own up. Sign of a mature organization.
     
  11. Schwifty

    Schwifty 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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  12. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    Just a little note....

    This is the 4th anniversary of the Mars Orbiter's launch. The PSLV-C25 was launched from SHAR on November 5, 2013...about an year later, Mangalyaan entered the Martian orbit (on September 24, 2017 it completed 3 years in Mars' orbit).

    So far it's been in orbit for 1140 days, and 1461 days in space (including the travel period from Earth to Mars).

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    [​IMG]

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    AstroSat Picture of The Month: Oct 2017

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    The Near-UltraViolet image of NGC 2336 observed by the UVIT on board the AstroSat. The bright spots along the spiral arms are regions of active star formation. Credits: UVIT Team.

    NGC 2336 is a magnificent barred spiral galaxy located in the northern constellation of Camelopardalis, or the giraffe. At a distance of 105 million light years away from us, it can even be seen through medium-sized amateur telescopes under dark skies. This galaxy was discovered by the German astronomer Ernst Tempel in 1877. NGC 2336 has a highly developed and splendid spiral arm structure that emanates from a ring of stars surrounding a central bar. The spiral arms contain a number of star forming regions, or nebulae. These nebulae shine because of hot young stars that are bright in the ultraviolet.

    This was one of the first objects chosen to be imaged by the Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) on board AstroSat, in order to test its ability to resolve complex structure. The Near-UV (200-300 nm) and Far-UV (130-180 nm) images obtained were spectacular, showing details finer than in the image from the GALEX ultraviolet telescope. Astronomers found that the resolution of UVIT was 1.2 arc-seconds in the Near-UV and 1.5 arc-seconds in the Far-UV, which was much better than the initial goal of 1.8 arc-seconds. This superior resolving power, along with its large field of view, make UVIT an excellent instrument for investigating star formation in large galaxies like NGC 2336.

    For more information: https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1612/1612.00612.pdf

    “AstroSat Picture of the Month” is an initiative of the Public Outreach and Education Committee of the Astronomical Society of India and the AstroSat Training and Outreach Team. All pictures are archived at http://astron-soc.in/outreach/apom/.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2017
  13. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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  14. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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    The First Launch Pad (FLP) at SDSC SHAR is being upgraded from an Integrate on Launch Pad facility to an Integrate-Transfer-Launch facility as with the second launch pad.

    This would allow to increase the number of launches from FLP to 15 from present 6.

    http://www.shar.gov.in/sdscshar/projects.jsp

    A high res pic of MOTR as a bonus :)

    [​IMG]
     
  15. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Captain FULL MEMBER

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    India, Japan working on lunar sample return mission
    SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
    BENGALURU, NOVEMBER 17, 2017 21:16 IST

    Third trip to Moon for space agencies of both the countries
    India plans to visit the moon a third time and also return, with Japan for company this time.

    Their lander and rover mission will bring samples back from moon, the chiefs of the two space agencies said on Friday.The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) have started to work out the contours of their joint trip — which will be the third for both countries. They did not say when it would be sent.

    The plans are in the early stages: ISRO Chairman and Secretary, Department of Space, A.S.Kiran Kumar, and JAXA president Naoki Okumura said the ‘implementation arrangements’ are likely be reached in a couple of months. The pre-phase studies to decide the scope of work — or the focus of the mission — should be clear in the next six months.

    They were addressing a news conference in connection with the annual Asia Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum APRSAF-24 which met here over the last four days.

    Dr. Okamura said that with this collaboration, “India and Japan will lead the space sector in the Asia Pacific region. We hope we can do it as soon as possible. It is not easy as we are understanding each other’s [goals and capabilities].”

    ISRO sent its first orbiter mission to moon, Chandrayaan-1, in 2008 and plans a lander rover mission by March 2018.

    @Gessler @Agent_47 @Nilgiri @Abingdonboy @MilSpec @ni8mare and others...
     
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