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Japan-India Relationship

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by BlueOval, Oct 25, 2010.

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  1. Galaxy

    Galaxy Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    India, Japan Progressing Toward Atomic Trade Pact

    Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011

    India and Japan are gradually progressing toward agreement on a bilateral atomic trade accord, informed insiders told the Singapore Straits Times on Wednesday (see GSN, July 21).

    An agreement would permit Japanese firms to export nuclear technology to India and enable the use of Japanese-manufactured atomic components by other nations in their work in the South Asian nation.
    "A full agreement is still some months away, but you could see a notable announcement on the subject during the Japanese prime minister's trip to New Delhi," a source told the Singapore newspaper.
    Japanese head of state Naoto Kan or his replacement is slated to travel to India in December.
    On Friday, India was not brought up when the Japanese government asked lawmakers to sign off on atomic trade deals with Jordan, Russia, South Korea and Vietnam.

    While the March disaster at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant initially froze talks on the agreement, the main obstacle is nuclear-armed New Delhi's continued resistance to signing the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (see related GSN story, today).
    Tokyo has strong rules against the sale of sensitive nuclear technologies to countries that have not joined the accords. In seeking an exemption to that policy, India has emphasized it has never delivered its nuclear weapons technology to outside parties and has drawn attention to its self-imposed moratorium on nuclear testing.

    Nuclear powers France and the United States, which both have concluded their own atomic trade deals with India, have recently been pressing Tokyo to make an exception in granting a deal to India, the Straits Times reported (Ravi Velloor, Straits Times, Aug. 24).
    Meanwhile, Indian authorities have brought charges against four members of Parliament suspected of involvement in a scheme to deliver bribes to ensure political support for the ruling government, the Associated Press reported (see GSN, March 24).
    The coalition government in New Delhi survived the confidence vote in 2008, allowing it to successfully press ahead with efforts to persuade the Indian Parliament to approve a nuclear trade deal with the United States.

    A police source identified the lawmakers charged in the case as Amar Singh, Ashok Argal, Faggan Singh Kulaste and Mahavir Bhagora.
    Amar Singh is a member of the Socialist Party who is suspected of providing payoffs intended to persuade three members of the opposition Bharatiya Janata Party to back the ruling government. Further details about the charges filed against the four suspects were not immediately available.
    A U.S. diplomatic dispatch leaked in March indicated that the Congress party of Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had handed out $2.5 million in bribes to lawmakers. The prime minister denied that any payoffs had occurred (Muneeza Naqvi, Associated Press/Daily American, Aug. 24).


    NTI: Global Security Newswire - India, Japan Progressing Toward Atomic Trade Pact
     
  2. satz

    satz Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Japan drops seven more Indian companies from restricted list


    For the second year in a row, Japan has removed several Indian companies from its end user list. The seven Indian organisations removed from the End User\Entity List can now enter into transactions involving sensitive dual-use equipment, technology, and software.

    The difference from last year is that seven Indian companies have been dropped and none added. Last year while 11 companies were dropped, four new ones were included. In all only a dozen Indian companies now remain on the Japanese end user list for foreign companies.

    With talks on a civil nuclear agreement not much headway, this Japanese initiative would set the stage for intensive high level interactions planned towards the later half of the year that would culminate in a summit meeting. Government sources termed the move a visible symbol of the desire of both countries to pursue a robust strategic partnership."

    Public sector companies active in the space and defence segments dominate the list of companies taken off the Japanese end user list and their gradual removal could lead to some high-tech Indo-Japanese exchanges in these areas.

    Missile makers Bharat Dynamics Limited, two Indian Space Research Organisations – Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre and Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Defence Research & Development Organisation’s Solid State Physics Laborotary and Armament Research and Development Establishment and a private sector company United Phosphorus Limited are among the major companies which can now uninhibitedly explore for business opportunities in Japan.

    Incidentally, at least half of a dozen of these companies were dropped early this year by the US Government from its Department of Commerce's 'Entity List'. Then U.S. Ambassador to India Timothy J. Roemer had said this will strengthen global non-proliferation efforts, open new doors for space and defense cooperation and high technology trade.

    Last year some of the companies removed from the Japanese end users list included some DRDO and ISRO companies besides Godrej & Boyce and Rashtriya Chemicals Limited. However, some new entities such as the DRDO's Aeronautical Research Development Establishment were added.

    Improving ties with the two Far Eastern neighbours — South Korea and Japan — is part of India's “Look Eastâ€￾ policy that involves greater security and economic partnerships with these two countries, besides China, Australia and the 10 Association of South East Nations.

    India flagged its interest in a strategic relationship with South Korea by signing a civil nuclear agreement during the recent visit by President Pratibha Patil and could be attempting to dovetail summit level bilateral interaction with the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul next March.


    Ref:-The Hindu : News / National : Japan drops seven more Indian companies from restricted list
     
  3. satz

    satz Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Japan planning to invest more in TN


    [​IMG]


    Japan is planning to invest more in Tamil Nadu and enhance its dialogue with the State government for better investment relations, said Akitaka Saiki, Ambassador of Japan to India, here on Thursday.

    Addressing a round-table on ‘Infrastructure trend and outlook for Tamil Nadu to be the best', organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), he said the Japanese investment in the State in recent years had been very impressive with more than 245 companies setting up base.

    Dwelling on the infrastructural inadequacies of the Ennore port, he drew attention to its poor road connectivity, inadequate facilities within the port area and very high port charges.

    The State government could take up the matter with the Union Government and also do its part in building access roads to the port. On the lines of Delhi-Mumbai Industrial corridor, a golden necklace could be made by connecting Chennai and Bangalore, he said.

    Earlier in the day, the Japanese Ambassador called on Chief Minister Jayalalithaa and said Japan would like to have continued dialogue with Tamil Nadu.

    In his address, Kou Kimura, Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of Renault Nissan Automotive India, expressed concern over the delay in completion of the Oragadam Industrial Corridor; construction of general cargo berth ports in Chennai and shortage in other facilities. He called for improving the conditions within the port by studying traffic conditions.

    Itaru Ishibashi, Managing Director of Toshiba JSW, said the need of the hour was developing adequate road infrastructure for transportation of very heavy products such as steam turbine generator weighing up to 450 tonnes.

    N. Sundaradevan, Principal Industries Secretary, said the government was aware of the infrastructure deficiencies, and the key to getting and sustaining investments was to develop infrastructure.

    T.K. Ramachandran, Secretary, Highways and Minor Ports Department, said Ennore and Chennai Port would be connected through a four-lane road. The work on Oragadam Industrial corridor was on and would be completed by March 2012.


    Ref:-The Hindu : States / Tamil Nadu : Japan planning to invest more in State
     
  4. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    I like Japanese Anime :happy:
     
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  5. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    India bids for closer East Asia ties for regional integration

    [​IMG]

    INDIA-JAPAN SYMPOSIUM

    Pact with Japan can help trade, investments while China disputes are set aside for growth

    India wants to play a role in the economic integration of Asia through closer ties with East Asian powers including China — despite a long history of political hostility — and Japan, journalists and experts from India said at a recent symposium in Tokyo.

    An economic partnership agreement with Japan that recently took effect is hoped to boost bilateral trade and investment ties that have so far remained well below the potential, they said.[​IMG]


    The veteran journalists and experts from India were taking part in the symposium organized Sept. 15 by the Keizai Koho Center under the theme, "Japan-India relations in a new era of the Asia-Pacific region." Yasukuni Enoki, a former Japanese ambassador to India, served as moderator of discussions.

    As India's economy has expanded four to five times since it started liberalization efforts two decades ago, its trade and investment relations with East Asia have grown sharply, noted Rajeev Anantaram, senior associate editor of the Business Standard daily.

    Today the world's ninth largest economy, India has had an average annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 7 percent since 2000, and its performance after the global financial crisis following the 2008 failure of U.S. investment bank Lehman Brothers shows that the nation has become resilient to external shocks, he said.

    As it continued to pursue liberalization programs, India concluded a series of free trade agreements with East Asian economies. Even economic ties with China, with which India has long had political tensions over border conflicts, "have expanded rapidly over the last 10 years . . . as the two governments decided that economic synergies should not be allowed to suffer" because of the disputes, Anantaram said.

    Today, China is India's second largest trading partner, while India is China's 10th largest. While capital equipment such as machinery account for nearly 70 percent of Chinese exports to India, primary products such as iron ore and low value-added products comprise a large portion of Indian exports to China, he noted.

    Chinese investments in India are also increasing, with major automakers and wind power equipment manufacturers showing interest in light of growing consumer needs and power demand in India, he pointed out.

    Trade relations with Japan, meanwhile, have been sluggish as India "has been off (Japan's) radar or below the radar" for a long while, Anantaram noted. Japan is India's 14th largest trading partner, with the volume of bilateral trade at around $10.3 billion — compared with $230 billion between Japan and China, he said.

    Tokyo and New Delhi have concluded the bilateral Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA), which took effect in August. Under the accord, India will remove its tariffs on 94 percent of goods and Japan on 90 percent of goods over the next 10 years, and the two governments have set a target of increasing the bilateral trade volume to $25 billion by 2014. Anantaram said he hopes the accord will be "a fillip that helps jump-start the economic relationship, which is way below potential."

    India has so far been "largely excluded from Japan's regional production networks" in Asia due to geographical and other reasons, he pointed out.

    He noted that the volume of Japanese companies' investments in India is also far below their investments in China, although the gap is not as wide as seen in trade statistics. However, what really counts is the quality of the Japanese investments, he said.

    "If the nature of Japanese investments in India changes, even modestly, from being horizontal — which means market-seeking — to vertical or export-oriented, where part or all of the production system are moved to India to be reexported to Japan or to a third country," then it would benefit both countries, Anantaram said.

    Japanese automakers Suzuki and Nissan have been expanding their production in India, "and we'd like to see more vertical foreign direct investments replacing horizontal FDIs," he said.

    Rajaram Panda, a senior fellow at the Institute for Defense Studies and Analysis in New Delhi, also expressed hope that the CEPA will put Japan-India economic ties into higher gear.

    The number of Japanese firms entering the Indian market has already grown in recent years, from about 200 in 2006 to 800, "but the figure is still very small compared with the number of Japanese firms in China," Panda said.

    Human exchanges — a key component of closer bilateral ties — remain limited to certain sectors. India has had a growing presence in Japan's information technology sector, with the number of Indian IT engineers having reached 15,000 prior to the March 11 Great East Japan Earthquake. About half of them left the country following the disasters, but many have reportedly come back since then, he said.

    Still, the number of Indian students in Japan stands at just around 500 — compared with roughly 70,000 Chinese students in Japan, he noted. "Indian students in Japan are even outnumbered by those from Bangladesh and Nepal. Meanwhile, there are about 7,000 Indian students in China," he said.

    India has often been talked about as a counterbalance against fellow emerging Asian giant China — both in the economic and the regional political context. At the same time, when regional economic integration is discussed, India's position is left in the air as the talks have long centered on East Asian countries.

    Panda noted that while economic integration is market-driven, there are various impediments including political and security issues.

    Along with the political issues that frequently crop up between Japan and China or South Korea, India's disputes with China must be overcome as India aspires to play a role in regional integration, said Jayanta Roy Chowdhury, a senior editor of The Telegraph (India) newspaper.

    With European and U.S. markets in turmoil, it makes sense for Asian countries including India to work toward regional economic integration, he said, adding that closer integration will help the region "insulate itself better from the economic problems of the West."

    Among the fast-growing nations in the region, India, which is forecast to grow more than 8 percent this year, "has a lot to offer as three-fourths of its GDP comes from domestic demand," whereas China is more export-oriented — as are Japan, South Korea and ASEAN, Chowdhury said.

    Since the 1990s, India has adopted a "Look East" policy of trying to "revive all trading and cultural links with East Asia" that had been neglected as the nation "depended on trade with the West for its very tiny share of global commerce," he said.

    East Asia was initially cool toward such efforts by India, which had troubled relations with China and much of ASEAN in the 1960s and '70s, he said. That changed when India began to achieve rapid growth and that came to be recognized in comparison with China's rapid rise, which was accompanied by Beijing's increasingly assertive diplomacy on what it called issues of "core concerns," he noted.

    "A perception has gained ground that India's rise to maturity will be benign, and as such, many in East Asia seem more likely now than before to balance their interaction with China and India," he observed.

    As a result, India "has become more acceptable as a partner in most of East Asia," Chowdhury noted. India concluded a free trade agreement with ASEAN that took effect in January 2010. ASEAN is already India's fourth largest trading partner after the European Union, the U.S. and China, he said.

    Still, China remains the key to regional economic integration and "China has to accept us to join the East Asian community," Chowdhury noted.

    A joint communique issued by Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao in New Delhi in December 2010 suggests that the two nations "support the multilateral cooperation mechanism in Asia and view positively each other's participation in regional and subregional cooperation processes," Chowdhury said. China has also agreed to a broad-based cooperation with India within the framework of the East Asia Summit, and the two countries are engaging in high-level economic dialogue with the aim of increasing the volume of two-way trade to $100 billion by 2015, he added.

    "Indian analysts believe that China, after decades of hostility over border disputes, has now decided to engage India for two reasons — its desire to have a 'peaceful periphery' and to engage a rising India for mutual economic benefit," he said. "A third reason would also be to try to mute the influence of the U.S. in Asian affairs, especially since the U.S. has made it clear that it wants India to play a role beyond South Asia."

    But Chowdhury said it appears premature to say that China has fully accepted India as a partner in East Asia. While the Chinese government has not officially commented on India's Look East policy, its state media seems to view that policy and India's free trade accords with East Asian economies "as an attempt to encircle China," he said.

    China also wants the existing ASEAN plus three (China, South Korea and Japan) framework to be the basis for a regional free trade arrangement, while seemingly trying to keep out India, Australia and New Zealand — countries in the ASEAN plus six grouping — as "outsiders," he noted.

    In the end, the question lingers on whether East Asian economic integration — or an Asian economic integration — "will remain hostage to the rivalry between China, Japan and India," Chowdhury said.

    "All of the three powers have to work out ways of addressing each other's sensitivities," he said. "India needs to constructively address China's doubts about its Look East policy while engaging it increasingly in commercial terms. At the same time, (it needs to) continue the deepening of bilateral relations with Japan, ASEAN and South Korea."

    Two other speakers discussed security in the Indian Ocean security and the implications of China's growing naval presence. The Indian Ocean is the "world's most important waterway with 50 percent of container traffic and 70 percent of crude oil being carried through it," noted Vidhi Upadhyay, senior assistant director for defense and aerospace at the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry.

    Just like other Asian economies, security in the Indian Ocean is vital for India, 75 percent of whose trade in value terms and 95 percent in volume terms moves by sea, she said. The share of maritime trade in India's GDP has grown steadily from 16 percent in 1995 to 28 percent in 2005, and is projected to rise to 55 percent in 2020, she noted.

    Since 2008, India's Navy has been "at the forefront of anti-piracy operations in the Indian Ocean," where 266 cases of piracy was reported in the first half of this year alone, Upadhyay said.

    Japan and India signed a security cooperation agreement in 2008, and the Indian Navy and Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force have both taken part in the Exercise Malabar naval drills with the U.S., Singapore and Australian navies in 2007 and 2009, she noted, adding that further bilateral cooperation is needed on this front.

    The pact with Japan is among over a dozen defense cooperation pacts that India concluded with East Asian nations over the past decade, said Prakash Nanda, editor-in-chief of the Uday India weekly and editor of the Geopolitics monthly.

    "India needs to have a profile in this part of the world,.given the fact that India's total volume with East Asian economies now exceeds that with the European Union or the U.S., while more than half of India's trade goes through the Malacca and Singapore Straits," Nanda said. "This economic reality drives India's naval strategy."

    In the meantime, China's growing naval muscle -modernization of its naval forces both in terms of technology and manpower — "is certainly not inspiring for the Asia-Pacific security environment," he said. "Although China talks of peaceful settlement of disputes through bilateral and multilateral negotiations, China's bellicosity over the past two years in both East and South China Seas have raised serious questions about its intentions," he added.

    India wants "good and enduring relations" with China, and as an emerging economic power and major consumer of energy, it favors a multilateral action to meet common challenges to regional maritime security, he noted.
     
  6. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    So do I.

    Bleach, One Piece, Naruto, Deathnote etc
     
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  7. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    haha,
    all those are not even the beginning of my list,
    i am a hard core anime fan.
     
  8. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    When I stated watching Anime, Bleach and One Piece were the first because Bleach has over 300 episodes and One Piece is over 500 episodes. You actually learn a lot from anime.
     
  9. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    yes, i have learned quiet a bit about Japanese culture,
    it was helpful for the visit there.

    although i dont watch one piece
    way too much eps. Bleach is my choice,

    also there are a number of series from
    the early 1980s they are my favorite.

    maison ikkoku
    wismical orange road
    ranma 1/2
    urusei yatsura
    Super Dimensional Fortress Macross
     
  10. sanman

    sanman Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Haha, I saw SDF Macross back in 1985, when it was adapted into english as Robotech, by Carl Macek of Harmony Gold. I also occasionally corresponded with Macek, who died last year.

    Yeah, Macross was like Japan's Star Wars, but there are a lot of other good action animés. I've watched too many to count.

    Bubblegum Crisis was also a good cyberpunk mini-series, back in the day.
    [youtube]HBlATPpx_3w[/youtube]

    So was Cowboy Bebop.

    But animé production values have declined over the years, because of the rising cost of animation. Now there's a preference for CG, which is gradually compromising the hand-drawn art.
     
  11. sanman

    sanman Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Does anybody remember Yugo Sako's animé version of Ramayana? It's been aired on DD a number of times, and was pretty groundbreaking back when it first came out.

    I posted some scenes on youtube:

    [youtube]d74zxZAs1m8[/youtube]

    As you can see, it's gotten nearly a million views in the past 5 years.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2011
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  12. satz

    satz Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    please don't post any thing Off-topic.. keep the thread going....
     
  13. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    India, Japan to hold strategic dialogue; nuclear energy in focus​


    NEW DELHI: India and Japan will hold their fifth strategic dialogue from Friday during which the two sides will review and discuss ways to strengthen cooperation in key areas, including civil nuclear field, trade and security.

    During the two-day dialogue, to be led by External Affairs Minister S M Krishna and his Japanese counterpart Koichiro Gemba, the two sides will also discuss agenda for visit of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda here in December.

    "They will review all aspects of the bilateral strategic and global partnership and discuss regional and international issues of mutual interest," the Ministry of External Affairs said here today.

    India and Japan have held three rounds of talks on the civil nuclear cooperation deal, which seems to have suffered a setback due to Fukushima nuclear disaster after the earthquake in Japan.

    Significantly, Japan has exempted India from the cuts it has implemented in its overseas aid programmes following the tsunami and the nuclear disaster at Fukushima

    Given that the dialogue comes just days after increased Chinese assertiveness in South China Sea and barely weeks before the the East Asia Summit next month that will focus on evolving an inclusive regional architecture in which both countries have high stakes, the two leaders are expected to discuss issues relating to them.
     
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  14. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG]Japan-India bilateral relations are set for a serious upgrade in the coming days, with two important back-to-back visits from the Indian side setting the stage for more intense engagement between the two Asian powers.

    First, Indian External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna begins his official three-day trip to Tokyo on October 28. Krishna will hold wide-ranging talks with his Japanese counterpart, Koichiro Gemba, and will also call on Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda. The high point of the visit will be the 5th annual Japan-India Strategic Dialogue, which will be co-chaired by the two Foreign Ministers and will provide an opportunity for them to review all aspects of their bilateral partnership.

    Days after Krishna leaves Japan, another senior Indian minister will be paying a visit, with Defence Minister A.K. Antony set to be in Japan on November 2 for the defence dialogue, a new institutionalized mechanism set up between the two Asian powers. Though Krishna and Gemba will be touching upon defence and security cooperation between India and Japan, this particular domain will be given a clearer focus when Antony holds meets with his Japanese counterpart.

    No bilateral agreements or documents are going to be signed during the Krishna-Gemba talks, with the event set to be largely an exercise that allows the two sides to update each other on bilateral progress, regional politics and other international issues. The two foreign ministers are expected to engage in so-called SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis, and reaffirm their allegiance to promoting their strategic partnership.

    An Indian diplomat familiar with the upcoming foreign minister-level talks told The Diplomat that the two sides would look to ‘maximize their convergences,’ but added that the Indo-Japan relationship doesn’t come at the cost of either power’s relations with other nations.

    Such comments are almost certainly made with China in mind, and both Delhi and Tokyo will be keen not to make Beijing feel it is being encircled. Still, India and Japan are set to inch closer to one another, and it’s hard not to imagine that China will see this development in zero sum terms.
     
  15. Katsuhiro

    Katsuhiro FULL MEMBER

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    It would be important to make more faster decisions on our behalf. Not because I like India personally, but also fact that whatever business opportunities we delay, we lose to other countries. My view is that being friendly Asian countries with many similar values in our cultures, Japan and India should have a faster mechanism to speed up all our strategic and business agreements.

    In my country we have very less people who are wishing to talk much about warfare and military matters today, but I am one of those few who has much belief that trade and economics can be safe only if military relations between two strongest countries in Asia historically are good.
     
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