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Japan-India Relationship

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by BlueOval, Oct 25, 2010.

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  1. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Army Chief leaves for Japan

    [​IMG]


    Chief of Army Staff (CoAS)General Bikram Singh on Monday set off for Japan on a four-day visit, to firm up bilateral ties between the two countries and enhance defence cooperation. “The visit of the Army Chief to Japan is part of the ongoing high-level military exchanges between the two countries and highlights the importance of India’s peaceful and friendly ties with Japan,” the Army Headquarters (HQ) said in a statement here.

    New Delhi and Tokyo had taken their bilateral ties to newer heights following the establishment of the India-Japan global partnership for the 21st century in August 2000 and the strategic and global partnership in 2006. And defence and security cooperation have emerged as the major highlight of the strategic partnership.

    A Defence Policy Dialogue was established between the two countries and the Army-to-Army talks were institutionalised under this mechanism. The defence cooperation between the two sides has been characterised by joint efforts in the field of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, exchange of personnel for training courses and delegation visits at the functional level, apart from the cooperation in the UN peacekeeping operations.

    And both India and Japan had indicated a willingness to further enhance cooperation in other areas of mutual interest in the defence and security sector.

    Meanwhile, the Army Chief is scheduled to hold talks with the Japanese Self-defence Forces Chief of General Staff, the Chief of Army Staff and the Defence Minister during the visit.

    Gen Singh will also visit the Japanese military training establishments and various formation headquarters.
     
  2. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Recently the Japan Maritime Defence Force and the Indian Navy met in a multilateral forum to undertake coordinate anti-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden.

    On February 26, Vice Admiral Katsutoshi Kwano, chief of staff, Japan Maritime Self Defence Force accompanied by his spouse and high level delegation visited Mumbai.
    During the visit, Kwano interacted with the Vice Admiral Shekhar Sinha, the flag officer commanding-in-chief and other senior officers of the Western Naval Command.

    “Indo-Japanese Naval cooperation and goodwill has grown substantially over the last two decades and both the navies share common maritime perspective. JMSDF and Indian Naval Ships undertake coordinate anti-piracy operations in Gulf of Aden. Both navies have over the years built up high levels of interoperability,” said Chief PRO (Defence) N Vispute.

    Vispute said that the first India-Japan maritime affairs security dialogue was held in New Delhi on January 29, 2013. Representatives of both the countries participated with their focus on maritime security including non-traditional threats and cooperation at various multilateral forums.

    The current visit of COSJMSDF is one of the steps towards strengthening bi-lateral cooperation between the two Navies.

    India, Japan conduct naval meet | idrw.org
     
  3. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    If the enemy of my enemy is my friend, then India and Japan are partners in a great love affair. The common “enemy†— or at least a suspect viewed as a threat by both of them — is China. From opposite sides of Asia, these two huge but very different democracies share common cause in territorial disputes with China for which there seems no immediate solution.
    China’s expansionist moves from East to Southeast to South Asia form the background to a visit to Japan this week by India’s Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in which he and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe are primed to broaden security and commercial arrangements with implications for China. If they’re not forming an alliance, they’re getting about as close as they can come without signing a formal treaty.

    The immediate background for why India and Japan, so different culturally and economically, get along so well with one another are scrapes with China that touch upon the deepest sensitivities and interests of both of them.

    No way can Japan and China come to terms on the Senkakus, Diaoyu in Chinese — that cluster of five small uninhabited islands and a few rocky islets in the East China Sea southwest of Okinawa that Japan holds but China claims. Japanese Coast Guard boats patrol the surrounding waters, fending off Chinese fishing boats, and “research†vessels, in a standoff that has come to symbolize centuries of hostilities between China and Japan, which overran much of the Chinese mainland in the 1920s and ’30s before Japan’s defeat in August 1945.

    India still rankles under China’s seizure of its of territory on its far north Himalayan frontier in 1962 and is suspicious of Chinese moves there and also in the northeast. China’s Premier Li Keqiang waged a charm offensive when he visited New Delhi last week, but Indians don’t seem mollified by China’s agreement to withdraw a handful of troops three weeks after pitching a tent on India’s side of what’s called the Line of Actual Control.

    India claims Chinese are still harassing Indian troops, stopping them on occasion from reaching their positions and patrolling the Indian side of the line. China, of course, is not going to return territory seized in the 1962 war — most of it barren and uninhabited, more than 15,000 feet above sea level, but of symbolic significance. In the Indian northeast, Chinese maps still show the state of Arunachal Pradesh as “southern Tibet†while the Chinese increase their influence in Nepal, the buffer between China and India.

    If those disputes are probably not about to flare into wider wars, they do mean that India and Japan find they have a lot of mutual interests. Japan under Article Nine of its post-war “no war†constitution still forswears sending troops overseas just to show the flag, but India has sent a flotilla of four navy vessels through the Straits of Malacca and into the South China Sea.

    The flotilla, including a destroyer, a frigate, a corvette and a fuel tanker, would seem to pose a direct challenge to Chinese claims over the South China Sea though the Chinese show no signs of responding. Abe, meanwhile, has said he sees the interests of India and Japan converging between the Indian and Pacific oceans.

    The Chinese do seem to have taken the bait of Singh’s visit to Japan. Incredibly, the People’s Daily, the voice of the Chinese Communist Party, has warned India to “be wary of petty Japanese burglars.†The editorial suggested that Chinese leaders were annoyed that Singh should have taken off for Tokyo so soon after receiving Premier Li Keqiang.

    The point of the editorial was that India should be grateful to China for having resolved the latest border dispute while “Japanese politicians will bring disgrace on their own heads.†Presumably Japan’s grip on the Senkakus is the reason the Chinese are blasting the Japanese as “burglars.â€

    The fact is, however, that India and Japan are likely to reach military arms deals, including an amphibious plane. Japan has previously banned the export of any arms at all.

    China sells no arms to India but is the biggest source of arms for Pakistan — another reason for India to “look east†to Japan. Under the circumstances, Singh would seem to side with Japan when it comes to the Senkakus though he’s not quite saying so.

    India?s Love Affair With Japan Fueled By Disputes With China | idrw.org
     
  4. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    India, Japan join hands to break China's 'string of pearls'

    TOKYO: Despite Beijing's fulminations, India and Japan on Wednesday lifted their strategic convergence to a new level by vowing to work together for ensuring stability in the Asia-Pacific region in the face of growing muscle-flexing by China.

    As Japan pledged financial assistance for big-ticket projects like the Chennai-Bangalore industrial corridor and third line of Mumbai Metro and displayed willingness for early conclusion of India's effort for civil nuclear cooperation, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe spoke of a partnership of the two democracies against use of force to change the order in Asia: diplomatic shorthand for Chinese attempt to arm-twist Japan and other nations into making territorial concessions.

    The two sides agreed to institutionalize joint exercises by their navies and to increase their frequency even as Japan offered its highly advanced sea plane Shinmaywa or US-2 in what is the first instance of Tokyo's willingness to offer a technology that has both military and civilian applications. A very sophisticated craft, the amphibian plane has a very long range and can land and take off in choppy waters.

    India's department of atomic energy and Japan's ministry of economy, trade and industry signed a memorandum for cooperation on the development of rare earths industry in India, a significant element of the expanding cooperation considering Japanese dependence on China for critical raw materials.

    The new momentum in ties was evident from the statements of both the prime ministers which stood out against the backdrop of the advice of People's Daily, a mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party, that Japan should deal with China in a calm way and not be swayed by "internal and international provocateurs".

    In a toughly-worded opinion piece, the daily lashed out at Japanese politicians, calling them "petty burglars" on China-related issues. Surprisingly, the Chinese daily said India and China were able to resolve their standoff over the incursion of People's Liberation Army in Ladakh swiftly, saying, "In the development of Sino-Indian ties, there are several divergence (sic) and contradictions. Some countries see these differences as an opportunity to provoke dissension."

    If the comment was intended to deter India and Japan, the effort ended in failure. "It is not only our spiritual and cultural affinities that bring us together, but also our shared commitment to democracy and international peace. The success of our partnership is vital for the prosperity of our people and indispensable for a future of peace and stability in Asia and Pacific region," Singh said in his banquet speech.

    He elaborated on that in his statement to the media, "India and Japan are natural and indispensable partners for advancing prosperity in our two countries and for a peaceful, stable, cooperative and prosperous future for the Asia- Pacific and Indian Ocean regions."

    Saying that the maritime democracies were obligated to safeguard oceans, Abe said, "India from the west, Japan from the east, the confluence of the two most deep-rooted democracies is already one important part of international common good for the 21st century. I am of a belief that it is important that Japan and India should ensure that Asia remains in peace and prosperity."

    In fact, Tonohika Tanaguchi, counsellor in the cabinet secretariat and member of Abe's strategic communication team, said the relationship could grow into an ever-lasting alliance, although he added that the deepening of Indo-Japan partnership was not aimed at any other country. He also spoke about China seeking to grab Senkaku/Diaoyu islands in the East China Sea.

    Tanaguchi emphasized that the emperor and empress of Japan had agreed to visit India by the year-end despite their ripe age, and mentioned that their decision to host the prime minister and Gursharan Kaur was an extraordinary gesture, considering that Singh was not the head of state.

    The Indian side was not dismayed by Japan refraining from agreeing to a civil nuclear energy cooperation agreement. Foreign secretary Ranjan Mathai noted that the joint statement emphasized India's excellent non-proliferation record: significant in view of Japan's sensitivities, the only country against which nuclear weapons have been used.

    Sources said the delay was because of "domestic consultations" and some movement could be expected after elections to the Japanese Upper House got over in the third week of July.

    India also committed support to Japan's bid to host the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    India, Japan join hands to break China's 'string of pearls' - The Times of India
     
  5. Rock n Rolla

    Rock n Rolla Lt. Colonel STAR MEMBER

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    Japan, India split over policies toward China

    Though India has an interest in the Asia-Pacific region, it is reluctant to adopt security policies that target a specific country

    Although Japan and India have agreed to reinforce bilateral security cooperation, the two countries still have differing views on forging an international coalition to handle China’s military expansion.

    Japan wants to create an international coalition together with India, the United States and other nations, to put pressure on China. However, New Delhi is a seeking multilateral foreign policy that places equal importance on its relations with not only Japan and the United States, but also China, Russia and the Middle East.

    On Tuesday evening, a day before their summit meeting, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife Akie invited visiting Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and his wife Gursharan Kaur to the prime minister’s official residence for a small, intimate dinner meeting.

    The invitation was unusual because another official dinner was held Wednesday evening, and it is rare for Japanese prime ministers to host the same foreign guests for two consecutive days.

    Political observers said it was an indication of Abe’s high expectations for India.

    The prime ministers’ joint statement also included many points regarding bilateral security cooperation.

    In the statement, Abe and Singh said their two countries would regularly hold joint exercises between the Maritime Self-Defense Force and the Indian Navy, as well as begin talks for the export of the MSDF’s US-2 amphibious plane to India. They also said they would cooperate to better counter cyber-attacks, ensure safe sea lanes and bolster both countries’ defense and coast guard authorities.

    The points put forward in the joint statement clearly indicate they were drafted with China’s increasing maritime presence in mind.

    In the East China Sea, Japan and China continue to dispute the sovereignty of the Senkaku Islands in Okinawa Prefecture.

    Submarines assumed to belong to the Chinese Navy have frequently appeared in Japan’s territorial waters, putting pressure on Japan.

    China has also increased its presence in the Indian Ocean.

    In February, a Chinese state-run firm obtained management rights to a port in Pakistan, in addition to providing assistance in building ports in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

    China’s “String of Pearls†strategy has progressed in areas surrounding India.

    In Kashmir, Chinese and Indian armies were locked in a stand-off from mid-April to early May, creating tension in the region.

    China has allocated about 12.3 trillion yen for its 2013 defense budget, much higher than Japan and India’s combined budget of about 8.3 trillion yen.

    As it would be difficult for Japan or India to unilaterally take action against China, the two countries have thus adopted a strategy of deterring China by cooperating on security matters.

    India also has a deep interest in the Asia-Pacific region and a forward-looking attitude toward boosting cooperation through joint military drills and other means. However, India is reluctant to adopt security policies that target a specific country.

    Instead, India expects that such cooperation will help introduce technology that will improve its military capabilities.

    According to a senior official at India’s foreign ministry, the country’s top priority is stability in the Indian Ocean.

    While cooperation with the United States and Japan is essential, the official added that it does not intend to participate in Japanese and US foreign policies that aim to create a network to surround and deter China.

    http://www.thestatesman.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=459049&catid=39

    GoI is not serious in handling China issue, visits alone won't suffice
     
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  6. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Japan is one of the biggest investors in India. Japan's relationship wth India is very stable and friendly. This relationship holds a lot of potential.

    However we must remember that Japan has its limitations, and is not a substitute with relationship with either USA or Russia.

    Japan has a pacifist constitution and is barred from military operations overseas.

    It's military is for protection of home islands.

    We can get a lot of advanced tech from Japan, especially in naval area where they excel.
     
  7. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Japan is very good in optics. Why India does not ask Japan for night sights?
    Japan may be willing to set up a plant in India.
     
  8. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    What is this dumb stooge gonna do in this tour. Nothing.
     
  9. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    do you even read the news related with japan......... first thing japan is not allowed to sell weapons to other but made a execptional treaty with india in this regard but why we ask night sights from them when domestic production is on.

    the constituion of japan is about to change... present japanese PM abe is one used it as one of many promises in elections. japanese are re arming themselves and will change the constitution when they are ready to stop playing passive.

    and Japan is single nation which will ever come to help you if there would be a war with china. russia will play natural for sure and USA will ask for a lot of things and will force you to open your market and will over price its equipments if there will be a need for them.
     
  10. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Please enlighten me about 'domestic' production of night sights. I would like to know more.

    Not sure if rest of your post is a response to mine.
     
  11. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    google it.. or search in this forum.. I never do other's work
     
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  12. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Read this: Broadsword: None so blind as those who will not see

    I suggest you research first what you write.

    I am trying to be very restrained and civil on this board. I am shocked at the behavior of people like you. You have no manners whatsoever.
     
  13. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    yes I have no manner for those whom I consider lich... I always make a catogory of people and treat them accordingly.. and you are in low levels of those catagories from the day I read your first post.. you don't know anything, never try to learn anything, understand anything or try to evaluate before starting bowing infront of russia, USA and china...

    I have no manners for people without backbone and you are such a person.. so better will be if you start ignoring me.. and I will do same for you. and on India manufaturing night vision devices.. check in OFB for

    Bino night vision passive cased 101A
    Passive night vision binocular light Wt
    Passive night vision monocular
    Passive night sight for rifle and LMG
    Passive night sight for 84 mm RCLII

    and on tibaati made indian force its Special Frontier Force
    Special Frontier Force - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    next time try to be ignore if you don't know all not civil.
     
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  14. S K Mittal

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    japan also shares some good relations with BD.
     
  15. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    So just mentioning SFF, and you become intelligent and all-knowing. You are crazy.

    You have no idea about a lot of things you talk about. What is your background?

    I am going to open new thread and we shall see what you know.

    People like you is the reason this country is bogged down.
     
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