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Japan-India Relationship

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by BlueOval, Oct 25, 2010.

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  1. Rock n Rolla

    Rock n Rolla Lt. Colonel STAR MEMBER

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    You don't need to know the background of a member to reply, The content is all that matters. There's no need for personal abuses if you don't like or can't counter a member's argument.

    If you continue in this manner you'll be wearing pink uniform soon!!
     
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  2. S K Mittal

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Apart from all the jokes and shit. I think jus give him a last chance. He has stated some POV which r worth considering. REst is on moderators
     
  3. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    the real reason is I had not submitted to his theories.. but waiting for all the knowledge he claim till now he just opened a thread and said nothing
     
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  4. S K Mittal

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    let us see what he will do there
     
  5. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Japan wants India’s support on disputes with China

    Japan wants India’s support on disputes with China

    [​IMG]

    Engaged in a territorial dispute with China, Japan on Thursday sought to rope in India’s support over “the recent Chinese provocative actions†saying a message needs to be sent to it collectively that status quo cannot be changed by force.

    Japanese Defence Minister Itsunori Onodera said dialogue is the only way to resolve the row created by imposition of restrictions by China in the East China Sea and other areas.

    “For both India and Japan, China is an important neighbouring country. Both countries have important economic linkages with China. However, after the recent Chinese provocative actions, entire international community will have to send a message to China,†he told PTI in an interview in New Delhi.

    “Both Japan and India should ask for a dialogue with Chinese side and tell China not to change status quo by force. These issues should be solved through dialogue and following international rules,†the Minister said.

    He was responding when asked whether India and Japan could come together on issues with China as both the countries have territorial disputes with it.

    The security situation in the region against the backdrop of recent tensions between Japan and China triggered by imposition of ‘Air Defence Identification Zone’ (ADIZ) over East China Sea and other areas by China came up during talks between Mr. Onodera and his Indian counterpart A.K. Antony on Monday.

    During the meeting, Mr. Antony is understood to have told Onodera that India stands for freedom of navigation in international waters and application of global conventions.

    After the ADIZ started creating tensions in the South East Asian region, India had stated that the issue should be resolved between the concerned parties through dialogue in a peaceful way and it was against use of force to resolve the matters.

    Asked about an earlier proposal by Tokyo for forming a trilateral grouping of India, Japan and the U.S. to deal with challenges from China, Mr. Onodera said, “India and Japan have good ties with the U.S. Economically and internationally and in terms of military forces, these are big countries.â€

    He said that, “If India, Japan and the U.S. are in cooperation and send a common message to the Chinese side that will mean a lot.â€

    The Japanese Defence Minister said his country shares strong ties with both India and the U.S.

    “We share the same interests in safety of sea lanes of communications and to secure the freedom of navigation. Trilaterally, India, Japan and the U.S. should be cooperating in these areas,†he said.

    On his talks with Mr. Antony, Mr. Onodera said the two countries have decided to enhance their military ties and a number of decisions were taken during the meeting.

    The two sides have agreed on cooperation in Peacekeeping Operations between their respective agencies along with cooperation between the Japanese Ground Self Defence Forces and the Indian Army, he said.

    The two countries have also decided to conduct staff exchanges and discuss possibility of conducting staff talks between Japan Air Self-Defence Force and Indian Air Force and professional exchanges of test-pilots, professional exchanges in the field of flight safety and between their transport squadrons.

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  6. Sam_

    Sam_ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    No thanks ,we don't any tri-lateral alliance against any specific country and if it ever happen we sure don't need USA.
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    India, Japan Should Focus On The Asian Strategic Framework – Analysis

    Japan is clearly the flavour of the season as far as India is concerned. Japanese defence minister Itsunori Onodera was in New Delhi last week for consultations with his counterpart on how to strengthen and coordinate relations between the two sides in the security arena. In one of their rare visits, the Japanese Emperor and Empress were in Delhi in December. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will be the guest of honour at this year’s Republic Day function on January 26, 2014.

    With both India and Japan acknowledging the need to strengthen bilateral defence and security ties, a major chunk of the attention is likely to be on maritime security and anti-piracy efforts. While these are by no means unimportant facets of bilateral cooperation, more significant will be the role of India and Japan in shaping the Asian strategic order. Both the countries have a common and shared perspective on the Asian framework, even as it is an emerging one.

    Having said that, Defence Minister Onodera’s visit focused on some of the tactical and policy issues for enhancing the level and pace of India-Japan bilateral cooperation. Cooperation between the two navies has been an on-going affair, but what has been low on the radar until now have been the links between the air forces of the two sides. This was given some emphasis during the recent visit with the two sides agreeing to encourage more staff exchanges and coordinate the possibility of staff talks between the Indian Air Force and the Japan Air Self Defence Forces as well as exchanges of test-pilots, professional exchanges in the field of flight safety and between two transport squadrons of the two air forces. Also agreed upon was promotion of exchanges on UN Peace Keeping operations between various Japanese agencies (such as the Japan Peacekeeping Training and Research Centre, Joint Staff College (JPC), Central Readiness Force of Japan Ground Self Defence Forces and the Indian Army’s Centre for UN Peacekeeping (CUNPK), and expert-level engagements on humanitarian assistance, disaster relief and counter-terrorism between Indian Army and Japan Ground Self Defence Force. On the naval front, there were agreements on joint exercises between the Indian Navy and the Japan Maritime Self Defence Forces on a regular basis (with the Indian Navy to visit Japan this year). Some of the other aspects that were decided during Onodera’s visit included visit to Japan by India’s defence minister later this year and a decision to undertake high-level visits on an annual basis, conducting of the third 2+2 dialogue and the fourth Defence Policy Dialogue (Defence Secretary level).

    While a rising China factor is undoubtedly an important consideration for both India and Japan as they strengthen their cooperation, the two have been careful not to invite Chinese wrath and thus have not made a mention of China in any of their statements. However, as mentioned above, there are any number of areas including freedom of navigation, anti-piracy, uninterrupted commerce, safe energy corridors and an inclusive Asian strategic framework that are becoming important to both India and Japan.

    One of the key areas of potential cooperation is an arms trade relationship between the two sides. Japan’s lifting of a historic ban on export of arms under the policy guidelines issued in December 2011 has provided abundant opportunities for India and Japan to strengthen defence cooperation. Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda’s decision is something that came about with a lot of prodding from Japanese industry, which have been keen on getting its share of the growing defence market pie. Given that Japan is a sophisticated naval power in the region with advanced technologies and weapon systems, the reversal of the ban will make it free to enter into agreements for joint production and co-development of systems with their select partners. Obviously, the decision has had its share of domestic criticism in Japan, with many viewing it as Tokyo potentially moving away from its post second world war pacifist posture.

    As for India, even prior to the decision by Prime Minister Noda on lifting the ban, there was a Japanese proposal to sell New Delhi a multi-role amphibious aircraft, the US2, suitable for SAR (Search and Rescue) operations. The aircraft is significant for both the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard to undertake humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations in addition to more important search and rescue missions. A Joint Working Group (JWG) was put in place in May last year to work out the modalities of cooperation and the possible induction by the Indian Navy. The JWG is also studying the possibility of joint production, operation and training on the US-2i aircraft. Despite the Japanese inclination and the Indian interest, the deal has not been signed yet. Discussions on this were expected to be stepped up, with hopes that a deal would be announced during Prime Minister Abe’s visit, but this now seems unlikely. Sources now suggest that the second meeting of the JWG will take place in Japan this year and no decision is likely beforehand.

    Meanwhile, there are other systems and platforms on the offer list, including electronic warfare equipment and patrol vessels among others. Given India’s general aversion to buying defence items off the shelf, Japan has gone the extra mile offering India the option of establishing joint ventures with Indian partners, both in the public and private sector. However, the Indian reaction so far has been subdued.

    India has to get much more long-term and strategic in its defence diplomacy. While Tokyo made its intentions clear and official, New Delhi’s reaction has been less than forthcoming. On the US-2, India responded to Japan’s offer to supply the aircraft by asking the Japanese company to follow the usual route of tenders. Accordingly, in response to the Indian Navy’s Request for Information (RFI), there are three companies in the fray – Japan’s ShinMaywa, Canada’s Bombardier and Russia’s Beriev. While open tendering and transparent processes are to be encouraged, this is not how strategic ties are built. Japan’s offer of the US-2 was a strategic message that India missed, just as it did earlier with the MMRCA decision.

    Even as the alliance relationship with the US is key to Japan, Tokyo has understood and acknowledged the need to strengthen relations with India and other like-minded democracies. The idea of an ‘arc of democracies’ has been a pet theme of Prime Minister Abe. The quadrilateral initiative among India, Japan, Australia and the US was also an initiative to forge closer security ties among these countries. A diamond initiative was talked about by Abe during his campaign days last year.

    What do all these mean for India-Japan relations and the larger Asian strategic framework? Japan’s interest in defence trade with India is not entirely driven by commercial angles. While commercial factors are an incentive, a closer strategic partnership with Asian neighbours has become an important priority for Japan. In addition to the general concerns over the rise of China, Tokyo also has unresolved border and territorial issues with China. In the current context, the simultaneous rise of three powers – India, Japan and China – is a perfect design for conflict and rivalry. It does not help that China has had prior disputes with both Japan and India.

    Both Tokyo and New Delhi want to create a stabler Asian order by redefining partnerships in the region. Can India and Japan take the lead in this regard and form a concert of nations that would bring about balance of power in the Asia-Pacific? The role of small and medium powers such as Taiwan, Vietnam, Philippines, and South Korea is significant. India and Japan have to be able to offer stable options to an aggressive China.

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  8. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Abe to view India’s military, nuclear might at R-Day parade

    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, whose country is against nuclear weapons after suffering the horrific effects of the atomic bombing nearly 70 years ago, would be treated to a glimpse of India’s military and nuclear might at the Republic Day parade on Jan 26.

    Abe, had at an event to mark the 68th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima last August, vowed to realize a nuclear-weapons free world.

    A Japanese media person asked India’s external affairs ministry Thursday whether the Japanese premier and people would not “get some kind of bad feeling” at the sight of an array of India’s nuclear prowess.

    A trifle nonplussed, Gautam Bambawale, joint secretary (East Asia) in the ministry of external affairs, answered that the Republic Day parade is a military-cum-civilian parade, and “not purely a military parade”. He said the parade shows off India’s social and cultural aspect too.

    Bambawale said to have a Japanese premier be the chief guest of the parade after so many years is an honour and “we are delighted he has accepted the invite at a time not completely convenient, when Diet is in session”.

    Abe, who arrives on Jan 25, would meet Prime Minister Manmohan Singh that day and hold restricted as well as delegation level talks. The prime minister would host a banquet for him.

    On Jan 26, after attending the parade in the morning, Abe would meet business leaders in the evening before departing on Jan 27.

    The India-Japan civil nuclear agreement is unlikely to be ready for inking during Abe’s visit. Both sides are still in negotiations on the issue, he said, adding the subject is of “great sensitivity”.

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  9. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Japan And India: The Twin Pillars Of Asian Security – Analysis

    China’s emergence as Asia’s most prominent ‘regional spoiler state’ and its strategic trajectories betraying its ambitions to emerge as Asia’s most predominant power has left Japan and India to shoulder the challenges of operating as the twin pillars of Asian security.

    Argued for nearly a decade in my Papers has been the strategic reality that China alone cannot exclusively grab the Asian strategic space and that Asian strategic space has to be shared by China with Japan and India. China down the years has demonstrated that it has no intention to allow this and that on the contrary China has increasingly indulged in escalation of its territorial disputes with Japan and India thereby strategically down-size them.

    Asian security and stability in 2014 stands greatly endangered by China’s military provocations and military brinkmanship extending from the India-Tibet Himalayan borders in South Asia to South China Sea in South East Asia and finally to conflict escalation at Japan’s doorsteps in the East China Sea (Senkaku Islands).

    With China not emerging as the leading stakeholder in Asian security and stability, and contrarily emerging as the major challenge to Asian security, Japan and India now have to strategically operate as the twin pillars of Asian security and stability.

    Indicators exist that strategic realities have dawned on both Japan and India that they not only have to add substance to the Japan-India Strategic & Global Partnership 2006 but also hasten the process of their respective defence build-ups and strive for creation of an indigenous Asian ‘balance of power regime’ incorporating other Asian nations threatened by China’s military waywardness.

    Japan-India Strategic & Global Partnership 2006 comes into detailed focus with the forthcoming historic visit of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as the Chief Guest at India’s Republic Day 2014 Parade and celebrations which was preceded by an equally historic visit of Their Imperial Majesties, The Emperor and Empress of Japan.

    Related to these two significant events in the Japan-India relations extensive media analyses have appeared in the Indian media highlighting the imperatives of a continued and reinforcing Japan-India Strategic Partnership in a comprehensive sense.

    In this Paper therefore I would not like to indulge in a repetitive analysis but focus on how well-equipped Japan and India are strategically and militarily to shoulder effectively the onerous challenge of emerging as the twin pillars of Asian security and stability in the face of unremitting conflict escalation and military brinkmanship by China.

    China, it needs to be recalled has engaged in a massive build-up of its conventional military machine, nuclear weapons arsenal and its armoury of its nuclear ICBMs. China also has been engaged in an extensive build-up and expansion of its naval power including nuclear-powered and SLBMs equipped submarines. All in all China has amassed disproportionate military power, unrelated to its threat perceptions and now also a strategic concern for leading global powers like the United States and Russia.

    Japan has exhibited a strategic will not to appease China in the face of grave and threatening military brinkmanship of China in the overall context of strategically downsizing Japan. Conflict escalation over the Senkaku Islands and ADIZs are just the opening Chinese moves in its overall strategy of ensuring China’s dominance of the Western Pacific ad converting North East Asia into China’s exclusive strategic backyard.

    Japan has stiffly stood upto China recently both militarily and politically. Japan has refused to be cowed down in the face of the growing Chinese threat Militarily, Japan anticipating China’s not so benign strategic designs have been engaged in building its conventional military punch and deterrence. Japan has realigned its force deployments from its Cold War northern-bias deployments towards South and South West deployments. It has earmarked $ 240 billion for the period 2014-2019 for expansion of its submarine fleets, fighter aircraft and amphibious warfare capabilities to meet the China Threat.

    More significantly, Japan in view of changed security environment has enunciated its National Security Strategy, established a National Security Bureau, all geared towards integrated national security planning and operations.

    Politically also Japan has been engaged in recent times to widen its diplomatic contacts and initiatives in relation to its perceived threats from China. In a strategically significant move Japan in 2013 hosted a 2+2 Meet of Japanese and Russian Foreign and Defence Ministers to explore strategic cooperation between Japan and Russia. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the first year of his second term as Prime Minister has visited all ten nations of ASEAN in a diplomatic overdrive to garner greater political support for Japan’s political and strategic postures in relation to China.

    Prime Minister Abe’s overtures to India earlier and now in his second term as he visits India next week is geared towards adding more substantial contours to the already functioning Japan-India Strategic Partnership.

    India’s record and demonstrated performance in contrast to Japan to confront China’s military provocations and brinkmanship leaves much to be desired if it has to effectively safeguard its own security leaving aside the challenge of shouldering the responsibility of being the second pillar of Asian security alongside Japan.

    In terms of strategic will to face upto China’s repeated provocations and military intrusions into Indian Territory along the India- Tibet border, India has failed significantly. Sadly in the last ten years India has all along been engaged in a ‘China Appeasement’ policy and political timidity arising presumably from a lack of realistic grasp of strategic issues and overly relying on and misreading China’s protestations of sincere friendship for India. China’s actions on India’s borders do not match the talk.

    Regrettably, Indian policy establishment circles even shrink and shy away from mentioning the possibility of a “Live” China Threat to India’s national security and interests.

    India has consistently shirked from enunciating its National Security Strategy.. After a decade or so India’s nuclear doctrine continues as a Draft Doctrine. All this indicates how much India invests in its national security architecture.

    In terms of military preparedness to cope with the China Threat the Indian Armed Forces due to bungling Ministry of Defence prevailing over a Defence Minister who values his personal integrity more, have delayed materialisation of decades-long due inductions of modern weapons and equipment. Defence infrastructure along the Himalayan borders is years behind completion dates.

    India’s cutting edge combat air-power in terms of deficiency of 126 combat aircraft being fulfilled by the deal with France for Rafael fighter aircraft is in jeopardy, again because of the above attitudes.

    In terms of political initiatives to off-set the China Threat to India and to Asian security as a whole, India’s political leadership has not gone into any personal over-drive to offset China’s provocative postures. It was illuminating to read how China has reacted with a propaganda offensive to decrying the political initiatives by Japanese Prime Minister in Asian capitals.

    The much hyped US-India Strategic Partnership of the last decade implicit in whose evolution was to provide some sort of political if not military deterrence against a destabilising military rising China has failed to take off

    Reverting back to the main theme of Japan and India being twin pillars of Asian security and stability what needs to be sated is that it is not a mere concept but a pressing strategic imperative for both Japan and India. Both Japan and India as leading powers of Asia are being incessantly being subjected to Chinese military provocations and brinkmanship. While Japan has openly recognised the China Threat, it is India that also has to recognise the same.

    India can no longer indulge in complacency in shirking away from exercising its strategic will in relation to the China Threat, nor it can it afford to let its war preparedness to downslide.

    Finally, India needs to learn a lot from Japan in terms of how to effectively emerge as a strong and reinforced second pillar of Asian security alongside Japan to offset China’s military provocations and brinkmanship. The Japanese Prime Minister declared in Washington some time back that Japan is determined to keep itself as Tier-I power in Asia and the world. India has yet to delineate ‘red lines’ which China should not cross in terms of impinging India’s security.

    China is engaged in strategic diminution of both Japan and India as peer competitors to establish its unquestioned primacy in Asian security environment. In response Japan is finally shedding the US-imposed mantle of pacifism. Similarly India needs to shed its strategic naivety and strategic timidity in facing China’s military provocations and brinkmanship.

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  10. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    India, Japan Showcase Partnership on Republic Day

    [​IMG]

    Japan’s prime minister and India’s president sat side-by-side on the reviewing stand here on Sunday as India celebrated a national holiday with a parade designed to display military strength.

    It was an important show of solidarity between Asia’s largest democracy and its richest as the two nations contend with an increasingly assertive, well-armed and authoritarian China.

    The weekend visit to New Delhi by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe marked a significant new stage in the two countries’ deepening strategic relationship as geopolitical tensions mount across Asia, diplomats from both sides said. Mr Abe was the guest of honor for festivities on India’s Republic Day, which commemorates the day its constitution came into force in 1950.

    Mr. Abe and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said their nations are committed to a global partnership based on “freedom, democracy and rule of law” to help maintain peace and stability amid “changes in the strategic environment.”

    China wasn’t mentioned by name. But worries about Beijing’s ambitions and its growing ability to project military power are driving closer ties between Japan and India, both of which are embroiled in territorial disputes with China.

    “It is clear both countries realize there is a major challenge looming on the horizon,” said Srikanth Kondapalli, an Asian security expert at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi. “India and Japan feel the need to do something, especially in the maritime-security realm.”

    Japanese officials said relations with India are far broader than defense cooperation. During Mr. Abe’s trip, the two countries agreed to a wide range of efforts to cement economic and commercial ties, with Japan saying it is committed to helping India further industrialize.

    Yet days before he arrived, Mr. Abe caused a stir at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland by comparing relations between China and Japan today to those between Britain and Germany before World War I.

    Japan, backed by the U.S., has launched a diplomatic offensive to draw other Asian countries into a more united front against China, which last year declared a new air-defense identification zone seen by many as a bid to reinforce its claims over disputedislands in the East China Sea.

    China’s claims there and in the South China Sea, where it is butting heads with Vietnam, the Philippines and other countries, have garnered the most international attention. But China has also been active to the west, along its land border with India and in the waters of the Indian Ocean.

    India has accused Chinese troops of making repeated incursions into Indian-controlled parts of the Himalayas. Beijing, which also claims those areas, denies India’s allegations. The two countries fought a 1962 war over their Himalayan border.

    Indian policy makers have also grown increasingly concerned about China’s presence in the Indian Ocean, which India views as within its sphere of influence and which encompasses critical transit routes for shipments of Mideast oil to India as well as to China and Japan. Beijing has funded port construction in Pakistan and Sri Lanka and its navy has been more active in the region.

    In December, Japan and India conducted their first bilateral naval exercise in the waters off Chennai on India’s southeast coast. Two Japanese destroyers joined three Indian warships to practice anti-submarine warfare. In January, the two countries’ coast guards staged joint maneuvers in the Arabian Sea.

    Sunday’s military parade included flyovers by the Indian air force’s Russian-made Sukhoi Su-30 fighter jets and a U.S.-made C-130J Super Hercules transport plane. India recently dispatched the Hercules to a high-elevation landing strip near the Chinese border, highlighting its ability to reinforce troops there.

    A wing of the advanced fighters is also set to move to a base in northeastern India closer to China, marking a reorientation in threat assessments by the Indian military, which for decades has focused largely on rival Pakistan.

    Mr. Abe’s weekend visit joins a series of recent high-level exchanges with India. Japan’s Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko came to India last year, and Mr. Singh visited Tokyo. Japan’s defense minister also made a recent trip to Delhi.

    Ties between the two haven’t been weighed down with the historical baggage that, to the consternation of Washington, burdens Japan’s relationships with some other Asian countries, most notably U.S. ally South Korea, and has hindered greater regional cooperation.

    During World War II, when India was still part of the British Empire, many Indian troops fought on the side of the allies. But Japan supported the creation of the pro-independence Indian National Army, which fought alongside Japanese troops in some battles.

    Korea, which was colonized by Japan for decades, says Japanese leaders have failed to adequately atone for the country’s actions—such as forcing Korean women to serve as prostitutes in Japanese military brothels during World War II. The two countries also have territorial disputes of their own.

    A visit by the newly elected Mr. Abe, a more nationalist leader than his recent predecessors, to the controversial Yasukuni Shrine, where 14 Class-A war criminals are honored along with Japan’s other war dead, angered Koreans. U.S. officials are pressing Mr. Abe to pledge not to visit the shrine again.

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  11. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    Japan enters where China is barred – northeast India

    NEW DELHI: Japan is sailing in where China fears to tread. As India and Japan ramp up their bilateral relationship, India has invited Japan to invest in and build overland infrastructure in areas which are generally out of bounds for Chinese investments.

    India and Japan used the visit of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to dramatically expand the scope of bilateral cooperation to include the politically sensitive northeastern states of India, areas where Chinese investment or projects are actively discouraged. Japanese companies will have the opportunity to help the development of the northeast specially to build roads, and aid agriculture, forestry and water supply and sewerage in these states.

    China claims Arunachal Pradesh as its territory, which has aggravated border tensions between India and China. Security agencies have also long tracked Chinese weapons assistance to militant outfits in northeastern states. It has taken India many difficult years to calm down these hills, but China remains a significant security threat.

    For India to invite Japan to build infrastructure here is a huge political statement. In 2007, China opposed an ADB loan for development works in Arunachal Pradesh describing it as "disputed territory". The last time the Japanese were in India's northeast was during the second world war, when they worked with Netaji Subhash Bose's INA to confront the British in Nagaland.

    Japanese companies have also been invited to help develop a new port in Chennai, which would be used to improve India's sea-route connectivity. India assiduously keeps China out of port development because they constitute India's critical infrastructure. Japanese assistance for Chennai port is also aimed at giving teeth to a new sea-based route that would start in Chennai, and end in Dawei port in Myanmar's Tanintharyi region. The port is being developed by Thailand.

    In 2012, Thai PM Yingluck Shinawatra had promised PM Manmohan Singh that Thailand would pump in a massive $50 billion into Dawei, making it a bigger investment than China's in Gwadar or Hambantota.

    The development of a new port in Chennai would serve to connect the industrial centres of southern and western India with southeast Asia. In addition, Japan's investment in the Bangalore-Chennai industrial corridor would find easy outlet from Chennai.

    In the larger strategic matrix, this would help in building an alternative supply chain network, giving Asia a viable alternative to the China-dominated networks currently in play. The India-Japan team for economic projects is ultimately placing pieces together to build a multi-polar Asia, a declared strategic intent of both countries.

    Japan and India have agreed to work together to develop infrastructure in other regional countries as well. This would have the double benefit of being a power projection for both countries in South Asia, it could be an effective counter to the Chinese juggernaut. For India, this would be an added advantage because it always falls short in delivering quality infrastructure by a moribund public sector system. An injection of Japanese funds and expertise is just what India needs.

    As part of the trilateral dialogue between India, US and Japan, a trilateral highway linking India, Myanmar and Thailand (the ambitious draw it further to Hanoi, Vietnam) is likely to see more Japanese and US interest. This is an India-led project due for completion in 2016, but by itself, India is unlikely to make the target.

    In Sri Lanka, where India is working hard to squander its hard won gains, it has invited Japan to help develop a huge thermal power plant in Trincomalee. Foreign minister Salman Khurshid recently inaugurated the project, which India has promised would be a better, cheaper power project than the one developed by the Chinese in Norachcholai.

    India and Japan could also jointly develop the strategically crucial oil terminals in Trincomalee. In retaliation for India voting against Sri Lanka in the human rights council, Sri Lanka has threatened to take away some of the oil terminals from India. A joint development project with Japan would solve many issues with Colombo.

    Buried in the agreements between India and Japan are a promise by Japan's JICA to help India's Export-Import Bank develop more attractive funding packages for Indian projects in regional countries. India always loses to China because Beijing offers finances at very attractive rates, which India cannot. India reckons that with Japanese help, it can up its own game in the neighbourhood.

    In the power play that is quietly underway in Asia, India has made Japan the centerpiece of its strategic outreach.

    Manmohan hosts Abes at home

    Keeping the special tempo in the India-Japan partnership, PM Manmohan Singh and his wife hosted the Japanese premier Shinzo Abe and his wife Akie to an exclusive, quiet dinner at his home Sunday evening.

    Also at the dinner was Shotaro Yachi, recently appointed Abe's national security adviser, and his Indian NSA Shiv Shankar Menon.

    Yachi has been Abe's closest foreign policy adviser for years. Japan's deputy vice minister Shin Sugiyama completed the table. This was probably the hihhest level strategic foreign policy conversation between Abe and a normally reticent Singh.

    Japan enters where China is barred ? northeast India - TOI Mobile | The Times of India Mobile Site
     
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