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Kamorta-class (Project-28) Corvettes : Updates & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by desiman, Apr 20, 2010.

  1. SR-91

    SR-91 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Also kamorta class 3rd n 4Th ships will have carbon fibre reinforced plastic superstructure bought from Swedish company.

    Incorporating this tech will make it lighter, faster, stealhier and cheaper to operate.

    This is the first time such technologies are used to build ships.
     
  2. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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    INS Kiltan

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Zer0reZ

    Zer0reZ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    The ‘100-Ton’ Difference In The Indian Navy’s New Submarine Hunter

    [​IMG]

    At 9am on the coming Monday, India’s new defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman will oversee her first warship commissioning ceremony. At the naval dockyard in Visakhapatnam, she will flag into service the INS Kiltan, India’s third Project 28 anti-submarine warfare (ASW) corvette. But there’s a significant difference between the Kiltan, and the two class types — INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt — that came before her. A 100-tonne difference.

    While the Kamorta and Kadmatt are built entirely of steel (DMR249A special grade high-tensile steel developed by SAIL in India), the Kiltan’s entire superstructure has been constructed with carbon fiber reinforced plastic — instantly shaving off 100 tons in weight from the brand new submarine hunter.

    Apart from the weight saving, top sources in the Indian Navy said the advantages of the new material are four fold: (a) It provides essential corrosion resistance to the exposed superstructure, (b) improves sea-keeping ability by increasing metacentric height (a measure of the initial static stability of a floating body). And finally, (c) the use of non-metals reduces radar signature and boosts stealth specifically by suppressing extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiations.

    Sources also said the Kiltan will be stealthier, more agile and a more survivable ship at sea than the two previous P28 corvettes. Weight gain from radar signature reduction work had extracted a significant price on the ship’s nimbleness and top speed during the final design stages. The decision to explore a composite superstructure was decided as an imperative for the two final ships. The Kiltan will cruise a shade faster than the two previous ships at about 24 knots.

    The P28 corvette class, built by the state owned Garden Rearch Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE) in Kolkata, are nearly 90 per cent indigenous, says its maker. While the two ships in service are finding their feet, the class ran into rough weather with the national auditor earlier this year over delays and the fact that the ships still don’t have their full complement of armament. The Kiltan, for instance, should have been delivered by July 2014 according to the original project contract.


    UPDATE: The Indian Navy just issued this official statement on the Kiltan:

    Kiltan is the latest indigenous warship after Shivalik class, Kolkata class and sister Ships INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt and sister Ships INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt to have joined the Indian Navy’s arsenal where in a plethora of weapons and sensors have been integrated to provide a ‘Common Operational Picture (COP)’.

    It is India’s first major warship to have a superstructure of carbon fibre composite material resulting in improved stealth features, lower top weight and maintenance costs. The ship is also the first major warship to have undertaken Sea Trials of all major weapons and sensors as a pilot project prior delivery by shipyard to Indian Navy and is ready to be operationally deployed on the day of joining the Indian Navy.

    The ship’s weapons and sensors suite is predominantly indigenous and showcases the nation’s growing capability in this niche area. The ship has been constructed using high grade steel (DMR 249A) produced in state-owned Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL). With a displacement of 3500 tonnes, the sleek and magnificent ship spans 109 meters in length and 14 meters at the beam and is propelled by four diesel engines to achieve speeds in excess of 25 knots with an endurance of 3450 nautical miles.

    The installed propulsion and auxiliary systems provides very low radiated underwater noise feature, required for anti-submarine warfare. Enhanced stealth features have been achieved by ‘X’ form of Hull, full beam superstructure, inclined ship sides and use of Infra Red Signature Suppression (IRSS) system designed by NSTL for cooling the Engine and Generator exhausts. About 81% of the ship is indigenous and it is well equipped to fight in Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) warfare conditions.

    The ship hosts a predominantly indigenous cutting-edge weapons and sensors suite which includes heavy weight torpedoes, ASW rockets, 76 mm caliber Medium Range gun & two multi-barrel 30 mm guns as Close-in-Weapon System (CIWS) with dedicated fire control systems, missile decoy rockets (Chaff), advanced ESM (Electronic Support Measure) system, most advanced bow mounted sonar and air surveillance radar Revathi. The ship in the future would also be installed with short range SAM system and carry an integral ASW Helicopter.
     
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  4. Gessler

    Gessler Lt. Colonel Technical Analyst

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    via LIVEFIST

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    INS Kiltan at Vizag - all set for commissioning!
     
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  5. Zer0reZ

    Zer0reZ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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  6. Zer0reZ

    Zer0reZ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Like all its predecessors, INS Kiltan joins Navy with major vulnerabilities

    It doesn't have advanced towed array sonar, essential for detecting enemy submarines in the shallow Arabian Sea.

    [​IMG]

    Like numerous Indian warships before it, the navy’s newest anti-submarine warfare (ASW) corvette, INS Kiltan, joined the fleet on Monday without equipment crucial for discharging its primary role – detecting and destroying enemy submarines.

    The Kiltan, like two predecessor ASW corvettes, INS Kamort and INS Kadmatt, was commissioned by Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman in Visakhapatnam without “advanced towed array sonar” (ATAS), essential for detecting enemy submarines in the shallow Arabian Sea where the peculiar temperature and salinity gradients sharply limit the effectiveness of conventional sonars.

    Without ATAS, enemy submarines can sneak undetected to within 50-80 kilometres of Indian warships and destroy them with heavy torpedoes from standoff ranges.

    The Kiltan will also make do without another vital ASW platform – a naval multi-role helicopter (NMRH), which flies low over the sea, lowering “dunking sonar” into the water listening for audio signals from enemy submarines. The navy is left with just a handful of NMRH choppers – 12 Sea Kings, of which no more than six are usually operational at any time; and eight Kamov-28, of which four-six are available. The navy must distribute these 10-12 helicopters between some 35 capital warships.

    “An ASW corvette without towed array sonar and an ASW helicopter, is nothing more than a feeble joke”, says a retired navy commodore with decades of ASW experience.

    Yet, neither of the two Indian warships that called on the Japanese port of Sasebo last week – the frigate INS Satpura and ASW corvette, INS Kadmatt – has towed array sonar. While passing through the South China Sea, these warships would have been at the mercy of Chinese submarines.

    In June, the defence ministry scrapped an NMRH purchase that had been initiated in 2009 and was at the point of conclusion. Instead, returning to the start line, the navy has now re-initiated fresh procurement for 123 NMRH.

    After this newspaper reported that every Indian warship built after 1997 lacked towed array sonar (“Warships in peril as defence ministry blocks sonar purchase”, May 16, 2014), the defence ministry contracted for six ATAS systems from German naval systems giant, Atlas Elektronik, for just under Euro 40 million (Rs 306 crore).

    Those six ATAS systems were earmarked for the navy’s three Talwar-class frigates (INS Talwar, Trishul and Tabar) and three Delhi-class destroyers (INS Delhi, Mumbai and Mysore). In effect, a Rs 50 crore ATAS multiplied the survival chances of warships worth several thousand crore apiece, each crewed by hundreds of sailors.

    Yet, the National Democratic Alliance government has gone slow on a follow-on proposal to build ten more ATAS systems at Bharat Electronics Ltd (BEL), in partnership with Atlas Elektronik. Those ten systems are intended for three Shivalik-class frigates (INS Shivalik, Satpura and Sahyadri); three Project 15A destroyers (INS Kolkata, Kochi and Chennai) and four Project 28 ASW corvettes, the third of which was commissioned today.

    Without ATAS, India’s frontline capital warships, including the aircraft carrier, INS Vikramaditya, rely on a relatively ineffective Passive Towed Array Sonar (PTAS), and an indigenous hull-mounted sonar called HUMSA to detect enemy submarines.

    Perhaps oblivious to all this, Sitharaman stated today while commissioning Kiltan that: “[T]he government fully appreciates the nation’s defence requirements and requisite finances… would be made available for the modernisation and development plans of the Navy”, according to a defence ministry release.

    INS Kiltan’s keel was laid in Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers, Kolkata (GRSE) in August 2010 and she was launched in March 2013. She has been undergoing sea trials since May, and has taken more than seven years in construction.

    The corvette, manned by 13 officers and 178 sailors, is propelled by a combination of four Wartsila diesel engines to achieve a cruising speed of 25 knots. She has an endurance of 3,500 nautical miles.

    In a significant departure from her predecessors, INS Kamorta and Kadmatt, INS Kiltan is India’s first major warship with an all-composite superstructure. This has made the vessel lighter by about 100 tonnes.

    Her weapons package includes heavy weight torpedoes, ASW rockets, an Otomelara 76 millimetre anti-aircraft gun and two multi-barrel 30 mm AK-630 guns for close-in protection against enemy aircraft.

    The corvette, in naval tradition, inherits her name from a previous INS Kiltan (numbered P 79), a Soviet-supplied Petya-class ASW vessel that served in the fleet for 18 years before she was decommissioned in June 1987.

    The four Project 28 corvettes are all named after coral islands in the Lakshadweep archipelago in the Arabian Sea.
     
  7. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Stealthy Kiltan to propel Navy’s anti-submarine warfare arm
    Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman will commission the home-grown stealth corvette at the Naval Dockyard in Visakhapatnam



    Visakhapatnam: Indian Navy’s Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) arm will further get a boost today when Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman commissions the home-grown stealth corvette Kiltan (post-commissioning INS Kiltan) at the Naval Dockyard here.

    Upon commissioning, the ship would join the Eastern Fleet and would enhance Indian Navy’s reach, striking capability and sustainability in the Indian Ocean Region.

    Kiltan is the third of four desi ASWs build under Project 28 (Kamorta class) and will be ready to be operationally deployed on the day of commissioning itself.

    Designed by Directorate of Naval Design and built by Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE), Kolkata, Kiltan is the latest indigenous warship after Shivalik class, Kolkata class and sister ships INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt to have joined the Indian Navy fleet.

    [​IMG]
    Photo credits: Indian Navy


    Manned by a team of 13 officers and 178 sailors, Commander Naushad Ali Khan is at the helm as her first Commanding Officer. The ship derives its name from one of the islands in Aminidivi group located in Lakshadweep and Minicoy Islands.

    Navy says a host of weapons and sensors have been integrated to provide a Common Operational Picture (COP). Its indigenous weapons and sensors suite showcases the nation’s growing capability in this niche area, says Navy.

    “Kiltan is India’s first major warship to have a superstructure of carbon fibre composite material resulting in improved stealth features, lower top weight and maintenance costs. The ship is also the first major warship to have undertaken sea trials of all major weapons and sensors as a pilot project prior delivery by shipyard to Indian Navy,” says a Navy spokesperson.

    Interestingly, Indian Navy says ship also boasts of the proud legacy of the erstwhile Petya Class ship of same name ‘Kiltan (P79) built in USSR. It had then actively participated as Task Force Commander in ‘Operation Trident’ during 1971 Indo-Pak war.

    “It had then served the nation with distinction throughout her illustrious service life from 30 October 1969 to 30 June 1987. The return of Kiltan in new avatar is a matter of pride of the people who have sailed with her and those who will be now part of her future missions,” says an official.

    Here are some of the key features of the mighty Kiltan

    • It is built using high grade steel (DMR 249A) produced in state-owned Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL).
    • The installed propulsion and auxiliary systems provides very low radiated underwater noise feature, required for ASW missions.
    • Enhanced stealth features have been achieved by ‘X’ form of hull, full beam superstructure, inclined ship sides and use of Infra Red Signature Suppression (IRSS) system designed by NSTL for cooling the Engine and Generator exhausts.
    • About 81 per cent of the ship is indigenous and it is well equipped to fight in Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) warfare conditions.
    • With a displacement of 3500 tonnes, the sleek and magnificent ship spans 109 meters in length and 14 meters at the beam and is propelled by four diesel engines to achieve speeds in excess of 25 knots with an endurance of 3450 nautical miles.
    • Weapons and sensors suite includes heavy weight torpedoes, ASW rockets, 76 mm caliber medium range gun and two multi-barrel 30 mm guns as Close-in-Weapon System (CIWS).
    • It has a dedicated fire control system, missile decoy rockets (chaff), advanced ESM (Electronic Support Measure) system, most advanced bow mounted sonar and air surveillance radar Revathi.
    • The ship in the future would also be installed with short range SAM system and carry an integral ASW Helicopter.

    http://english.mathrubhumi.com/news...rine-warfare-arm-nirmala-sitharaman-1.2315033
     
  8. SR-91

    SR-91 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    http://maritimebulletin.net/2017/10...tte-collided-with-russian-navy-hospital-ship/


    Brand new ship damaged:facepalm:

    Indian Navy Corvette INS KADMATT (P29) collided with stern docked Russian Navy ship IRTYSH in Vladivostok, at 1130 LT Oct 19, while maneuvering to dock, also by stern, at Russian Navy’s pier in Vladivostok downtown. IRTYSH suffered hull dents above waterline (according to Navy Command), no information on Indian Corvette damages. Corvette’s commander lack of practice in making fast stern, and language problems hampering communications between Indian officers and pilot, who was on board of corvette, are said to be the main causes of collision. Squadron of Indian Navy ships arrived to Vladivostok to participate in joint Russia-India Navy drills. Hospital ship IRTYSH: displacement 11300 tons, built 1989, complement 207. INS KADMATT commissioned 7 January 2016.

    indru1.jpg

    indru.jpg
     
  9. GuardianRED

    GuardianRED Captain FULL MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    Pal !!! ... stop with the facepalm !!!...no significant damage

    credit to @smiriti95 over at PDF

    [​IMG]

    The difficult wind conditions and features of the mooring, adopted in the Russian Navy, caused a minor accident during the mooring of ships of the Naval Forces of India. Trying to stick to a mooring stern, as it is practiced from the Russian sailors, the Indian navigators little miscalculated maneuver and tangentially got used to board the hospital ship of the Pacific Fleet "Irtysh", reports Trend. PrimaMedia from the scene. Sound collision was not heard was in a minor accident and no casualties on board the ships
    The Russian naval hospital had noticeable small dent. Russian sailors greeting the foreign colleagues on the dock, noted that nothing unusual had happened. The thing is that Indian commanders have little experience mooring stern to the dock since they Moor port side to dock . Due to the lack of such practice this maneuver is given to them hard. It is also important to take into account the language barrier - the pilot recommendations are given through an interpreter. In addition, 33 berth - waters of anguish, so freedom for maneuver ships here a little bit. Its own characteristics and complexity in the approach to the jetty and mooring has made coastal weather. Tugs failed to provide effective assistance in a strong wind, and failed to keep the ship from the lateral drift at the approach to the dock.
     
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  10. proud_indian

    proud_indian 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    The ‘100-Ton’ Difference In The Indian Navy’s New Submarine Hunter
    Shiv AroorOct 15 2017 6 55 pm


    [​IMG]

    At 9am on the coming Monday, India’s new defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman will oversee her first warship commissioning ceremony. At the naval dockyard in Visakhapatnam, she will flag into service the INS Kiltan, India’s third Project 28 anti-submarine warfare (ASW) corvette. But there’s a significant difference between the Kiltan, and the two class types — INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt — that came before her. A 100-tonne difference.


    While the Kamorta and Kadmatt are built entirely of steel (DMR249A special grade high-tensile steel developed by SAIL in India), the Kiltan’s entire superstructure has been constructed with carbon fiber reinforced plastic — instantly shaving off 100 tons in weight from the brand new submarine hunter.


    Apart from the weight saving, top sources in the Indian Navy said the advantages of the new material are four fold: (a) It provides essential corrosion resistance to the exposed superstructure, (b) improves sea-keeping ability by increasing metacentric height (a measure of the initial static stability of a floating body). And finally, (c) the use of non-metals reduces radar signature and boosts stealth specifically by suppressing extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiations.


    Sources also said the Kiltan will be stealthier, more agile and a more survivable ship at sea than the two previous P28 corvettes. Weight gain from radar signature reduction work had extracted a significant price on the ship’s nimbleness and top speed during the final design stages. The decision to explore a composite superstructure was decided as an imperative for the two final ships. The Kiltan will cruise a shade faster than the two previous ships at about 24 knots.


    The P28 corvette class, built by the state owned Garden Rearch Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE) in Kolkata, are nearly 90 per cent indigenous, says its maker. While the two ships in service are finding their feet, the class ran into rough weather with the national auditor earlier this year over delays and the fact that the ships still don’t have their full complement of armament. The Kiltan, for instance, should have been delivered by July 2014 according to the original project contract.


    But for all that’s progressive about the new ship, like its predecessors, it continues to be without an advanced towed array sonar — inexplicable contracting delays have meant the P28 class, purpose-built as submarine hunters, don’t have the primary sensor required for the task and for evasion of enemy submarines, a troubling absence that the navy has sought to downplay amidst the atmosphere of welcome for a new indigenous warship. Livefist has learnt that ATAS kits should be arriving soon for test and retrofitment on the three P28s and the fourth ship that will be commissioned next year.


    Kiltan is the latest indigenous warship after Shivalik class, Kolkata class and sister Ships INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt and sister Ships INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt to have joined the Indian Navy’s arsenal where in a plethora of weapons and sensors have been integrated to provide a ‘Common Operational Picture (COP)’.

    It is India’s first major warship to have a superstructure of carbon fibre composite material resulting in improved stealth features, lower top weight and maintenance costs. The ship is also the first major warship to have undertaken Sea Trials of all major weapons and sensors as a pilot project prior delivery by shipyard to Indian Navy and is ready to be operationally deployed on the day of joining the Indian Navy.


    The ship’s weapons and sensors suite is predominantly indigenous and showcases the nation’s growing capability in this niche area. The ship has been constructed using high grade steel (DMR 249A) produced in state-owned Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL). With a displacement of 3500 tonnes, the sleek and magnificent ship spans 109 meters in length and 14 meters at the beam and is propelled by four diesel engines to achieve speeds in excess of 25 knots with an endurance of 3450 nautical miles.

    The installed propulsion and auxiliary systems provides very low radiated underwater noise feature, required for anti-submarine warfare. Enhanced stealth features have been achieved by ‘X’ form of Hull, full beam superstructure, inclined ship sides and use of Infra Red Signature Suppression (IRSS) system designed by NSTL for cooling the Engine and Generator exhausts. About 81% of the ship is indigenous and it is well equipped to fight in Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) warfare conditions.


    The ship hosts a predominantly indigenous cutting-edge weapons and sensors suite which includes heavy weight torpedoes, ASW rockets, 76 mm caliber Medium Range gun & two multi-barrel 30 mm guns as Close-in-Weapon System (CIWS) with dedicated fire control systems, missile decoy rockets (Chaff), advanced ESM (Electronic Support Measure) system, most advanced bow mounted sonar and air surveillance radar Revathi. The ship in the future would also be installed with short range SAM system and carry an integral ASW Helicopter.

    https://www.livefistdefence.com/201...in-the-indian-navys-new-submarine-hunter.html
     
  11. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    Lovely. Just the kind of development we need in Ship Building.
     
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  12. Bloom 17

    Bloom 17 2nd Lieutant IDF NewBie

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    We still should go a long way in ship building when it comes to number of hull launches.
     
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  13. randomradio

    randomradio Colonel Technical Analyst

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    The carbon composites were imported from Sweden.
     
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  14. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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