Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Kerala Daleet priests: ‘Any Hindu can be a Brahmin’

Discussion in 'Internal Affairs' started by InfoWarrior, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2017
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    694
    Country Flag:
    India
    Shaju Philip meets the five who made the cut and finds a new generation of Dalit priests, armed with degrees from some prominent Vedic colleges, and at ease with rituals, having learnt the ropes in private temples across the state

    Written by Shaju Philip | Updated: October 15, 2017 1:38 pm
    [​IMG] Over nine decades ago, Dalits and backward castes weren’t even allowed in the vicinity of temples. (Source: Suresh Mamood)
    Related News
    Kerala has for the first time allowed Dalit priests to take charge of government-owned temples, taking a giant stride in its sometimes stutter-filled path to social inclusion. Shaju Philip meets the five who made the cut and finds a new generation of Dalit priests, armed with degrees from prominent Vedic colleges, and at ease with rituals, having learnt the ropes in private temples across the state

    Over nine decades ago, Dalits and backward castes weren’t even allowed in the vicinity of temples. It took the Vaikom Satyagraha of 1924 to ensure that temple roads in the then Travancore state were opened for all castes. It would take another 12 years and the royal decree of 1936 for Dalits and OBCs to be allowed entry into temples.

    On October 9, this year, the Travancore Devaswom (Temple) Board (TDB) broke another major barrier towards social inclusion in the state, appointing five Dalits as priests to temples under its control. The entry into the sanctum sanctorum was facilitated by the TDB’s decision to select priests in line with the recruitment process followed in government posts, including adhering to reservation norms.

    The TDB conducted an examination in 2016, held interviews early this year, and appointed 62 priests, of whom five are Dalits. While the current process faced little resistance, similar reform efforts in 1970, when around 10 members of the OBC community were appointed as priests, and in 1993, when OBC priests were finally allowed into temples, were vehemently opposed.

    In 1970, following strong opposition from the Brahmin community, the TDB changed the 10 priests’ designations to clerks and shifted them out of the temples. And in 1993, it took Supreme Court intervention to finally pave the way for an OBC priest.

    Unlike their predecessors, the new-age Dalit priests have worked at private temples. But being part of the TDB is an altogether different matter. The most prominent of the four autonomous temple boards in Kerala controlled by the state government, the TDB manages 1,252 temples in South and Central Kerala, has nearly 2,500 priests on its payroll, and handles an annual revenue of Rs 390 crore. Its portfolio includes 70 major temples, including the famous Ayyappa Temple at Sabarimala.

    [​IMG] Yadukrishna at the Shiva temple in Valanjavattam, where he took over as chief priest on October 9
    P R Yadukrishna, 21

    Priest, Shiva Temple at Valanjavattom, Pathanamthitta Dist

    With a sacred thread across his shoulder, ash and sandalwood paste smeared on his forehead and arms, P R Yadukrishna, clad in a crisp cream dhoti, looks every bit the archetypal temple priest. Only the 21-year-old has earned his thread, with his appointment as a priest, at the Shiva Temple at Valanjavattam in Central Kerala’s Pathanamthitta District, the first instance of a melsanthi (priest) being recruited on the basis of a rank list.

    Yadukrishna, a member of the Scheduled Caste Pulaya community, traditionally toddy tappers, had finished fourth among 946 candidates, who had appeared in the maiden examination and interview conducted by the Travancore Devaswom Board (TDB). His entry into the sanctum sanctorum, however, is of much bigger significance — it marks another watershed milestone on the road to temple equality in Kerala, through reform processes that have lasted the last 100 years.

    It is also, says the son of a farm worker from Chalakkudy in Thrissur district, the culmination of a long journey, which began with him hanging around the temple near his home. “I used to help the temple in my village by fetching flowers and washing utensils. My parents wanted me to become a temple priest. I even abandoned non-vegetarian food at the age of eight to become a priest,’’ says Yadukrishna, who is now pursuing a post-graduate course in Sanskrit.

    Yadukrishna says he left formal schooling to focus on his dream of becoming a shanthikkaran (temple priest). “I have been helping to perform pujas from the age of 15. No one had asked me about my caste. Many of my friends who wanted to become priests abandoned the profession midway. But I stuck to it, hopeful of getting an opportunity. Now it has become a reality,’’ he says.

    If protests and resistance had marked the appointment of the first priest from the backward classes in 1993, sentiments among the upper caste communities, it seems, have mellowed. On October 9 when Yadukrishna landed up with his appointment order, the faithful and local advisors of the Pathanamthitta temple, majority of them upper castes, ensured that the Dalit priest was taken to the temple in a procession. He also shares a home with Prakash Bhat, a senior Brahmin priest with another temple in Pathanamthitta.

    Yadukrishna’s mentor, Anirudhan Tantri (senior priest), who established the Sree Gurudeva Vaidika Tantra Vidya Peedham at Paravur in Ernakulam district in 1987, remembers him as a “studious” boy keen on learning. “He came to me at the age of six as a helper who brings flowers for the puja at the Naalukettu Sree Dharma Sastha Temple at Chalakkudy,” says Tantri. Yadukrishna had enrolled for a tantric course at the Paravur institute, whose alumni work as priests across several temples in Kerala. The institute recruits teenaged, school-going youths, who are taught about various rituals and festivals in temples.

    [​IMG] Pradeep Kumar has studied a tantric vidya course and is now studying an astrology course. (Suresh Mamood)
    Pradeep Kumar K M, 31
    Priest, Dharma Sastha temple, Narayanamangalam in Ernakulam dist

    Pradeep Kumar’s father, M K Karunakaran, too wanted to be a priest. “My father could not complete his studies. I have shouldered his dream,” says the 31-year-old, now appointed at the Dharma Sastha temple at Narayanamangalam in Ernakulam district.

    Kumar, who has completed a vocational higher secondary course, says he began his journey into priesthood by offering daily rituals at the temple in his village of Perumbalam in Alappuzha district. He had initially stayed with a senior priest near Cherthala to learn the basics of rituals, but later joined a tantric vidya course at an institute run by the SNDP Yogam.

    Now he is studying astrology. “Learning astrology is an added advantage for a temple priest,” says Kumar, whose wife Dhanya is an accountant with a private firm. Kumar says he was unaware of the exam being conducted by the Travancore Devaswom Board. “I applied for the post at the behest of a friend, who intimated to me about the board’s recruitment notification. In fact, I didn’t think about a job under the TDB as, before this, it has never appointed any Dalit priest,” Kumar says.

    He adds that he didn’t need to prepare much for the examination, which was modelled on tests conducted by the State Public Service Commission. “We had to mark answers on OMR sheets. The questions pertained to puja practices and other temple matters,’’ Kumar says.

    “I see this selection as a blessing from my parents and teachers,” says the priest, who has worked in private temples for 14 years. “So far, I haven’t faced any protests from devotees. Also in private temples, nobody normally looks into the background of priests,’’ he says.

    [​IMG] Manoj says he cut his teeth as a junior priest, shuttling between privately-owned temples, for close to 22 years (Suresh Mamood)
    Manoj P C, 31Priest, Siva Temple at Arakkappady near Perumbavur

    About 115 km away from Valanjavattam, at Arakkappady near Perumbavur, Manoj P C has taken charge as the priest of the Siva Temple. The 31-year-old Dalit is the first member of his Vettuva community, traditionally coconut climbers, to be ordained as a priest of a TDB temple.

    Manoj says that for close to 22 years, he cut his teeth as a priest in smaller and privately-owned shrines, in the shadow of upper caste priests, while moving from one temple to another, and subsisting on a meagre income.

    In the private temples, mostly run by trusts, Dalit priests like Manoj work as assistants to the senior priests, who recommend them, and have little job security. They are also stop-gap arrangements, filling in when sitting priests go on leave. And their income would depend on the temple’s revenue and contributions while performing pujas.

    “We would go for private pujas and people would hand in contributions. In the initial days of my career, my monthly income was less than Rs 1,000. In recent years, I had been getting between Rs 10,000 and Rs 12,000 a month from assisting the chief priests and working in small temples,’’ says the son of daily wagers. All that is set to change with his appointment. Under the Travancore board, salary is fixed in the Rs 10,620-16,460 scale for the newly-appointed priests, who have to undergo a one-year probation period.

    The TDB priests are also entitled to pension after retirement, which would be one third of the last salary drawn. Manoj says he abandoned formal education at Class VII, to focus on studying temple rituals. “During my early school days, I used to assist the priest at the Subramania temple in my village of Nediyara in Ernakulam district,” he says.

    He got a break, he says, when the main priest at the prominent Devi Temple in Mannanthala, which was consecrated by social reformer Narayana Guru, took him under his wing. “I was lucky to work as an assistant to the main priest Sabu Santhi. When I joined to learn rituals under Santhi, there were 10 of us. Later, most of them left the field. Even if we become masters in performing rituals, if we don’t get opportunities, we will never become priests,” he says.

    After five years of studies, Manoj conducted his maiden puja at the Durga Devi Temple, Oruvathilkotta, near Thiruvananthapuram. Along the way, insists Manoj, he faced no discrimination. “I used to dine with Brahmin priests and we stayed together at the Durga Devi Temple in Thiruvananthapuram. Priests like Deva Narayanam Potti and Ambapapuzha Madusudhanan Namboothiri helped me a lot,” says Manoj.

    Kerala Vettuva Maha Sabha president C V Subramanian says Manoj’s elevation would inspire youngsters from the community. “When society is heavily polarised over religion, a Vettuva priest in a temple catering to mainly upper caste Hindus has much significance. This would encourage more children from the Vettuva community to pursue a career in priesthood,” he says.

    [​IMG] As the temple he serves is a small one, Jeevan is not expected to spend his entire day at the shrine (Suresh Mamood)
    Jeevan G, 26
    Priest, Maha Vishnu Temple, Kaduthuruthy, Kottayam

    In the four years he spent working in private temples, Jeevan G, 26, says he never once got an invitation from a Brahmin family to conduct a puja in their home. “Upper caste Nairs and members of the Ezhava community would invite us home for private pujas but never the Brahmin families,” says the youngest son of Gopalan, a farm worker and Thankamani, a homemaker.

    Terming TDB’s decision as a revolutionary step, Jeevan says that the fact Dalit men like him have been able to benefit from it, is solely due to the Sree Narayana Dharma Paripalana Yogam (SNDP), the social organisation that represents the numerically strong backward Ezhava community. The SNDP, he says, allowed Dalit men to learn about rituals in temples controlled by the Yogam. “Several Pulaya youth, including me, have got training in Ezhava temples. Without the gesture of that community, we would not have become priests,” he says.

    Although Jeevan’s older brother Sandeep is also a temple priest, it was he who first moved into the profession. “My brother was a medical representative but later embraced this profession. In the last year-and-a-half, he has been working as a temporary priest in a private temple,” Jeevan says.

    A bachelor, Jeevan’s spiritual grounding started early. “I began by assisting in temple matters during my school days. After Class 10, I joined as an assistant to senior priests at prominent temples,” says Jeevan, adding that his early years were marked by economic hardship, and to supplement his income, he worked as a daily labourer.

    “The job at TDB is of great relief. After a one-year probation, a junior priest is entitled to a monthly salary of Rs 18,000,” says Jeevan, who unlike the other four Dalit priests, had earlier worked with the Travancore board. “I worked at a TDB temple on contractual basis for nine months,” he says.

    Jeevan daily routine nowadays involves opening the Maha Vishnu Temple at 6 am and remaining there till 9.30 am. Since his home in Vaikkom is just 15 km from the temple, he returns home for lunch hours. Jeevan says he is then expected back at the temple at 5 pm. “This is a small temple, where a priest need not stay throughout the day. People are very cordial and many have personally come to meet me after hearing about a Dalit man being appointed to the temple,” says Jeevan.

    [​IMG] Sumesh (second from left) with his family at their home in Karuvelil in Kollam district (Suresh Mamood)
    P S Sumesh, 35

    Priest, Devi Temple, Nelluvila in Kollam district

    P S Sumesh is well aware that the road ahead for the Dalit priests is a tough one. “We are the first Scheduled Caste priests in the Travancore Devaswom Board. We don’t have predecessors from the community to guide us on how to handle difficult situations. And we are yet to see what our presence will mean to the community of TDB priests,” says Sumesh, a member of the Pulaya community.

    The Dalit priest is an anomaly in his family of government employees. His father K M Surendran had retired from the state municipal service as a clerk, his mother Ponnamma is an employee of the Animal Husbandry department, while his brother P S Sujesh is a police constable.

    That, the priest at the Devi Temple, Nelluvila, in Kollam district says, is because his foray into the world of shrines was accidental. “When I was in school, a swami visited our village, Karuvelil in Kollam, and sought children who could regularly kindle the lamp at the small temple there. From the small crowd, the swami picked me. That was my way to priesthood,’’ recalls Sumesh.

    A graduate in English, Sumesh has been working as a priest at various private temples for the past 10 years. “These days, most of the faithful do not bother about the caste of the priests. If we can deliver the result expected from a puja, we will be in demand. In such a situation, a priest has little to worry about caste,” insists Sumesh.

    The priests says his job will finally provide him much needed stability. “The job at TDB is a permanent one and my parents had asked me to apply for it. Besides, one can rise up in the TDB and retire as a senior priest with all benefits,’’ he explains.

    Sumesh also says his first salary would go to his guru, who he credits for having groomed him as a priest. “Becoming a temple priest is a long process. An aspirant cannot just become the disciple of a priest one fine day. The senior priest or tantri would closely observe an aspirant for months. I, for instance, was under the observation of my guru Sankaranarayan Potti for six months. Only if the guru is convinced about one’s intentions and impressed by one’s behaviour, would he accommodate one as a disciple,” says Sumesh.

    For all the latest India News, download Indian Express App
    http://indianexpress.com/article/in...t-temples-any-hindu-can-be-a-brahmin-4890673/
     
    Itachi and Wolfpack like this.
  2. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2017
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    694
    Country Flag:
    India
    After Kerala's historic step Tamil Nadu non-Brahmin priests look for similar change
    Tamil Nadu non-Brahmin priests are a hopeful lot these days after Kerala temples reluctantly welcomed a change to the Brahmanical domination.

    Kerala has recently appointed 62 priests to serve in temples administered by the Travancore Devaswom Board after subjecting the candidates to tests. Out of the 62, 36 were non-brahmins of which six were dalit candidates. It was the first time six people from the scheduled caste community have been recommended for the appointment as priests. It was the appointment of Yedu Krishna, the Dalit archaka appointed by the Travancore Devaswom Board, that led to this change.

    That's when Stalin, leader of the opposition in Tamil Nadu, chose to point out how the Tamil Nadu government had failed its priests by not appointing archakas (priests) irrespective of their caste. Over 206 archakas trained by the state government remain unemployed.

    PMK founder S Ramadoss tweeted a very pertinent line, "Appointing archakas from all communities has been possible in the land (Kerala) to which Periyar went, but still remains a dream in the land (Tamil Nadu) where he lived and won."

    Now, after the leaders have spoken out lauding the Kerala government for its progressive step, Tamil Nadu priests have taken up the cause hoping that the ambiguity is ended. The ambiguity has been caused by a decision by the Supreme Court which though upheld the State government's right to appoint members of all castes as priests, another part of the verdict stated: "appointment of archakas in temples following Agama rituals of individual temples concerned would continue".
    https://m.dailyhunt.in/news/india/e...iests+look+for+similar+change-newsid-74740772
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2017
  3. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2017
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    694
    Country Flag:
    India
    Appointment of Dalit priests in Kerala: Karnataka Govt. can follow suit
    [​IMG] Special Correspondent
    MYSURU , October 15, 2017 18:42 IST
    Updated: October 15, 2017 18:42 IST

    Chief Minister Siddaramaiah said the state government will consider appointment of Dalits as priests of temples coming under Muzrai Department.

    When his attention was drawn to the appointment of Dalits as priests of temples in neighbouring Kerala, Mr. Siddaramaiah said the state government can also consider it. The state government appoints priests for temples coming under the Muzrai Department. “We are not opposed to it,” he told reporters in Mysuru on Sunday.
    http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...taka-govt-can-follow-suit/article19865824.ece
     
  4. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Messages:
    13,818
    Likes Received:
    15,588
    Country Flag:
    India
    This is proper Sanatan Dharma based on vedic principles. Everyone is born a shudra and his karma makes him one of the four varnas. I welcome this change as this is our true religion.
     
    madmax613, SpArK, omya and 2 others like this.
  5. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2017
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    694
    Country Flag:
    India
    Brahmin priests demand expulsion of Dalit recently appointed to temple post in Kerala, suspend protest amid criticism
    By Online Desk | Published: 30th October 2017 08:32 PM |

    Last Updated: 30th October 2017 08:32 PM | A+A A- |


    Yedu Krishnan was the first among the six Dalit priests appointed by the Kerala government to take charge (Photo | Facebook/Rahul Easwar)

    A hunger strike that was announced yesterday by All Kerala Santhi Kshema Union (AKSKU), an organisation of Brahmin priests in Kerala, demanding the expulsion of a recently appointed Dalit priest, has been called off, amid criticism.

    Malayalam media portals on Sunday reported that AKSKU, with the support of Yogakshemasabha – a Namboodiri Brahmin welfare association, would stage an indefinite hunger strike before the office of Thiruvalla Devaswom Assistant Commissioner from Monday morning, demanding that Yedu Krishnan, one among six Dalit priests appointed by the Kerala Government, recently, be fired.

    Reports said that the AKSKU had accused Yedu Krishnan of starting the routine temple rituals late and going absent without leave, and not leaving anyone else in charge.

    It was decided that AS Krishnan Namboodiri, General Secretary of the AKSKU would start fasting from 10 AM.

    However, Yogakshemasabha told Express that the agitation has been suspended and denied any involvement in the event.

    “It was the AKSKU that had announced the strike. We had no involvement in it. This confusion emerged because many members of our association are a part of AKSKU as well,” said E Krishnan Namboodiri, All India Brahmin Federation Executive member and Alappzuha District Secretary of the Yogakshemasabha. A press release clarifying their stand will be published, he said.

    Krishnan Namboodiri said that the stir was called off as the Devaswom Ministry has promised to look into the accusations against Yedu Krishnan over neglecting his priestly duties.

    Yedu Krishnan had told the media earlier that the allegations levelled against him were untrue. He clarified that he had submitted his leave application in writing beforehand, but his substitute was a few minutes late for duty as the person’s father had met with an accident. No major delays in the daily activities of the temple were caused. Yedu Krishnan was not available to respond today.

    Minister extends support
    Stating that the real reason behind the Brahmin priests’ intention to go on strike their reluctance to accept a person from the scheduled caste as a priest in a temple, Kerala Devaswom Minister Kadakampally Surendran said, extending support to Yedu Krishnan. The Minister said temple procedures often start 10 or 15 minutes late due to personal reasons of the priests, but these organisations (AKSKU) have never bothered to agitate before.

    Nevertheless, he said it would be looked into if Yedu Krishnan had been negligent about work on purpose.

    Twenty-two-year-old Yedu Krishnan was one among six Dalit priests appointed by the Government of Kerala under the Travancore Devaswom Board, in a much-discussed revolutionary move. He was the first among the six to take charge when he assumed duties at the Manappuram Lord Shiva Temple near Thiruvalla in Pathanamthitta district.

    A native of Thrissur district’s Koratty, Yedu is a post-graduate student of Sanskrit and has an experience of seven years in priesthood.

    Social media slammed the proposed protest

    Following the news reports about the hunger strike, Facebook users from Kerala responded strongly against the agitators calling it the very latest incident exposing the casteist face of Kerala. “If the lower castes are not allowed to do pujas in temples, then the entire concept of Hindu unity put up by organisations like the Hindu Parliament (an organisation that says its stated objective is to unite all Hindus, regardless of caste) is a lie,” one user wrote.


    “If Dalits are also Hindu community, then why can’t they be priests? Why should there be separate temples? This is exactly what casteism is,” another person responded.



    Supporters of the agitation were asked by many people to show them which religious text of the Hindu religion bans lower castes from entering priesthood.

    http://www.newindianexpress.com/sta...ple-post-in-kerala-suspend-prote-1687369.html
     
  6. Pundrick

    Pundrick Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    923
    Country Flag:
    India
    This should have been the actual Varna system with equal recognition for every class regardless of their area of work.
     
  7. Pundrick

    Pundrick Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    923
    Country Flag:
    India
    Though I appreciate inclusion of every caste as priest in temples but it should not be enforced by the govt as this encroachment in religion. This should be driven by the people itself either by boycotting the extremist Brahmin priest or by appointing a priest from other caste.
     
  8. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2017
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    694
    Country Flag:
    India
    People elected the government, Government is executing will of the people. No one protests this...

    I'm just a informer or interpreter of facts... This is necessary to save Hinduim... or else these manuwadis with their fanatic intolerance will divide Hinduism. They don't see the change in society...

    Dravidians to stage sacred thread ceremony for pigs; Brahmins upset
    http://www.dailypioneer.com/nation/...-thread-ceremony-for-pigs-brahmins-upset.html
     
  9. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Messages:
    13,818
    Likes Received:
    15,588
    Country Flag:
    India
    Now this the idiots and Commies hitting the street after they realised that Hindus have no problem with Dalit priests.
     
    Pundrick, omya and Wolfpack like this.
  10. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2017
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    694
    Country Flag:
    India
  11. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,021
    Likes Received:
    1,264
    Country Flag:
    India
    Sacred thread ,Janeu is for practisers of Hindu religion,who follow certain rituals everyday. Tying that to a pig is openly Insulting Hinduism, i don't see these Dravidian group idiots do it to Christian or Islam. Get that Manuvadi thing out of your head and all your problems will be gone.
     
  12. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,021
    Likes Received:
    1,264
    Country Flag:
    India
    They thought there would be opposition and riots, when none of it happened,these Dravidian groups resorted to Insulting Hinduism by tying Janeu to pigs. Bunch of losers.
     
  13. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2017
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    694
    Country Flag:
    India
    TamilNadu has 6 crore Hindus, Brahmin population would be barely few lakhs. Riot outcome would be ...as expected. With BJP trying to make inroads into TN, no other choice for Brahmins but to drink poison like Neelkanth to avert crisis. Situation in TN...

    Attacks fuel Brahmin fears
    https://www.telegraphindia.com/1150422/jsp/nation/story_15964.jsp

    Memories of a violent movement led by Periyar
    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com...ement-led-by-Periyar/articleshow/47823566.cms


    You should know Pairatala Ravi
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paritala_Ravindra

    Muslim population maybe already higher than forward caste Hindu population.
     
  14. Sathya

    Sathya Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2016
    Messages:
    834
    Likes Received:
    832
    Country Flag:
    India
    I don't why some morons start stoking this in TN .

    They won't succeed by simply creating hatred .

    People are not fools to simply follow the hatred logic .

    Those days are long gone.
     
    Wolfpack likes this.
  15. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,954
    Likes Received:
    5,849
    Country Flag:
    India
    They are insulting casteism not Hinduism. Casteism is a reality not something you can avoid by not thinking about it.
     
    nik141993 likes this.

Share This Page