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Largest Emerging Economies, E7+SA, growth prospects and challenges

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by sunny_10, Jul 8, 2012.

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  1. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    dere should b some high class n costly training to own a gun license... den dat might lower the numbers of gun holders... n will raise awareness...
     
  2. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Most people are aware that if you shoot some one it often kills them. To get a CWP you have to take a 4 hour class in most states.
     
  3. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    look, if you compare 799 total murders in India (1.2billion) in 2011, as compare to just 11,000 murders by guns only in US (310million people) last year, along with 20,000 suicides by guns itself, which still hasn't considered murder through other ways, then you will find murder per capita of US to be very very high as compare to India, isn't it?????

    here, we also concluded that if we include suicides also then total scores in US, mainly by guns, is very close to the number they score in other countries under their different "Peace Establishing Wars"... :tup:

    (a disaster that the most violent country of the world keep fighting different peace making wars in other countries....:tsk: :facepalm:)


     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
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  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  5. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    4 hours ? lol
    wot does one learn in 4 hours ?
    dere should b renewal of license every 4 months n paid psychological test....
     
  6. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    NRIs moving from the US to India: How much salary to expect

    That story probably made news only because of its star power. The fact that NRIs from the US are moving back to India is no shocking development. NRIs have, in the last few years, been relocating to India in large numbers, in search of better personal and professional lives. And if you are an NRI considering that move, there is one important thing that you must understand very well: the salary you will get in India.

    Kris Lakshmikanth, Founder CEO of The Head Hunters India Pvt Ltd. says, "When it comes to compensation, we find that NRIs have inflated expectations. They mainly go by hearsay; their friend or friend's friend who returned to India has told them a tall story about Indian salaries. They want to go by that yard stick."

    USD will not convert to INR

    The first thing to remember is that you will not make the rupee equivalent of your US salary in India. The cost of living in India is significantly lower than that in the US. This also means a lower labour cost in India. These factors will determine your India salary. Seema Nair, Co-Leader India HR Operations of Cisco India explains, "The salary in India (for Cisco employees moving from US to India) is related to local labour market wage rates with a potential premium for critical skill sets."

    Achyut Menon, head of Options Executive Search Pvt Ltd also adds, "In the nineties, people who were posted to India got expat salaries. But those days are over. In the last 10 years, India has become an attractive market for global companies who are not just looking to set up offshore centers here, but also to capitalize on the growing, educated and highly aspirational middle class consumer segment. Added to that is the availability of skilled labour within India itself. Companies no longer need to pay expat salaries."

    Benchmark: What then should be the broad benchmark?

    Both Lakshmikanth and Menon say that while there cannot be a standard formula, the Big Mac Index is a good guideline to calculate salaries. The Big Mac index published by The Economist, is based on the theory of purchasing-power parity (PPP), according to which exchange rates should adjust to equalise the price of a basket of goods and services around the world. The basket in this case being a McDonald's Big Mac.

    Now according to the last available index dated July 2011, a Big Mac costing USD 4.07 in the US costs USD 1.89 in dollar terms in India (Rs 85 converted at an exchange rate of Rs 45). It means that the Big Mac costs 54% less in India; the cost of living is 54% lower in India. Read another way, this means that the rupee is undervalued by 54% to the dollar and that on the basis of PPP, one dollar would actually be worth Rs 21 instead of Rs 45.

    So if you are drawing a salary of USD 100,000 in the US, you can expect to draw Rs 21 lakh in India, give or take. At an exchange rate of Rs 45, that would translate to an Indian salary of USD 46,666 or 46% of the US salary.

    "Senior management can expect anywhere between 40% and 70% of their last drawn US salary when they move to India," Menon explains, adding, "At the 70% end would be people who have moved to India to set up a development/ engineering center or to head the global company's India start-up."


    Best career move

    Having set that broad benchmark, the salary would also vary between industries and functions. You would need to choose your profile and company carefully to maximise your salary.

    "Manufacturing would pay less than technology. Within technology, we find that delivery of software is something which Indian companies have become masters in. They don't need to employ people from overseas. In fact, such people from the US are paid less than the person who stayed back in India because those returning from the US have handled fewer people teams as compared to peers in India," Lakshmikanth points out.

    Similarly, domestic Indian companies do not usually recruit NRIs for strategic positions if the NRIs are not familiar with the dynamics of the Indian market and work place.

    As an NRI moving back to India, Menon says it would be best to join a company in the US which has plans to start-up/ expand in India. "A lot of US companies across sectors like engineering, legal, analytics, financial services, pharmaceuticals are setting up operations in India.

    These companies are happy to send an Indian to India who also has experience of their other markets.
    The employee benefits because he can grow with the company's operations in India. In the beginning, the company will set up a 30-40 staff office and expand going forward. As a member of the start-up, the employee grows as the company grows, making it a win-win for both" he explains.

    Parting shot

    "At the end of the day, come back to India for the same reasons you went abroad: for personal and professional growth and happiness. Come with a long term view in mind and you won't regret it," Menon advices.

    (The author is a chartered accountant and financial writer. She also blogs at blogs.economictimes)

    NRIs moving from the US to India: How much salary to expect - Economic Times
     
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  7. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    double post
     
  8. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Will India Match China's Manufacturing Might?

    When C. Northcote Parkinson -- economist, historian and humorist -- wrote "East and West" in 1963, the book's basic theme was that one day, India and China would combine to take on the West. At the time, the Sino-Indian war had just ended, and the book didn't make many waves. Over the past few years, however, things have changed; everyone has been talking about the powerful combination of India's expertise in software and services and China's capabilities in manufacturing. Today, there's a new twist. China has been upping its strength in the former and India has a newfound confidence in its might in the latter.

    This is not confined to the IT arena. "India will emerge as a strong manufacturing base," predicts Janat Shah, a professor of production and operations management at the Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore (IIMB) and founder-chairperson of its Center for Supply Chain Management. Jagdish Sheth, marketing professor at Emory University's Goizueta Business School in Atlanta, adds that India will become "a second sourcing destination" for the world economy.

    The numbers have already started signaling this development. In March, a new United Nations Industrial Development Organization report put India as one of the top 10 manufacturers in 2010. "India tops developing countries (China excluded) in production of textiles, chemical products, basic metals, general machinery and equipment, and electrical machinery," the report noted. In motor vehicle production, the country has overtaken Brazil and is behind only Mexico among developing countries. India's manufacturing value added has grown by over 10%, compared to 3.4% for the industrialized countries. The share of China, India and Brazil in world manufacturing output is now 32%, up from 20% a decade ago. :tup:

    Examples of this manufacturing story are everywhere. In March, General Motors India announced that the company wants to become an outsourced vendor of car engines made at the newly-opened Maharashtra plant. The firm also wants to ship the parts to GM's joint ventures in China. GM India's strategy is to find customers for the excess capacity at its US$220 million engine manufacturing plant at Talegaon near Pune. The plant can make 300,000 engines a year, but GM India doesn't need them all immediately. Last year, the company sold 110,000 Chevrolet cars in India, and expects to hit 300,000 only in 2013. "If I need to sell 300,000 engines [annually] domestically, then I need to start filling the gap," GM India president and managing director Karl Slym told business daily Business Standard. :coffee:

    Pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca sources active pharma ingredients (APIs) from India for use in its global operations, according to James Chelliah, CFO for branded generics operations at AstraZeneca India. "Over the years [sourcing from India] has been increasing year on year by around 100%," he says. "Of course, it's on a small base.... China is big for us from a market perspective. Our China business will be almost US$1 billion this year. But from a sourcing perspective, India is ahead of China."

    Through a partnership between Suzuki and Nissan, Indian subsidiary Maruti Suzuki manufactures the Pixo model compact car for sale in Europe, according to Mayank Pareek, Maruti Suzuki India's managing executive officer for marketing & sales. The Indian auto major is likely to start making vehicles for Volkswagen soon; in 2009, the German carmaker bought a 19.9% stake in Suzuki for US$4.5 billion. "The scope of the tie-up is under discussion between Suzuki and Volkswagen," adds Pareek.

    At Pfizer India, Thomas Lobo, director of global external supply, says there has been a significant increase in sourcing activity from India with an average annual growth of 35 to 50%. "We source drug formulations, APIs and drug intermediates. India is a leading country in drug product-formulation outsourcing, although we are starting to see competition from other markets, including China."

    The First Awakening

    The potential of Indian manufacturing was first highlighted in a 2005 Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)-McKinsey report titled, "Made in India." According to the report, "In the past, India did not tap into its manufacturing exports potential to the fullest. Going forward, however, Made in India could become the next big manufacturing exports story." Chelliah of Astra Zeneca agrees with that prediction. "India would be much better off in anything that has value-add and needs precision, because of its technical capabilities and qualified manpower," he notes.

    The McKinsey report predicted that the global trend to manufacture and source products in low-cost countries is likely to gain strength over the next decade, "particularly in the skill-intensive industries where India has a significant competitive advantage. If India were to take advantage of this trend, manufacturing exports could increase from US$40 billion in 2002 to approximately US$300 billion by 2015, leading to a share of approximately 3.5% in world manufacturing trade."

    But the report warned that in order to be successful, Indian companies needed to "adopt a global mindset to build scale and achieve cost excellence; acquire market access rapidly, including using inorganic routes such as acquisitions where required; strengthen design and innovation skills; build a global or regional operating footprint, and master the ability to manage a world-class talent pool and organization."

    Indian companies are now preparing to go the extra mile. A Capgemini-IDG research report titled, "Manufacturing in 2020," found that Indian companies "claim they will lead the pack in customer collaboration in 2020, a position they already say they hold. All the responding Indian companies say they already collaborate with customers at the R&D level. This could reflect the historical lack of manufacturing in India, and a strong national desire to 'catch up.'"

    India's rise in the manufacturing arena has to come at somebody's cost -- namely, China's, experts say. China has built its economic fortunes over the past three decades with large-scale, low-cost outsourced manufacturing for global markets. But economists have long predicted that China will cede its outsourced manufacturing base to other developing countries as its working-age population declines in the coming decades. The country has periodically battled threats to its status as a low-cost manufacturing hub -- a designation that has been helped by massive investments in infrastructure, education and training, and state incentives.


    The China Factor

    Are China's problems a passing phase? "This is not a flash in the pan," says Marshall Meyer, a Wharton professor of management and sociology. "Efficient and younger-age factory workers have been in short supply." In addition, factory wages have risen around 50% in the country's southern provinces like Guangdong that lead the export juggernaut.

    According to Meyer, the Chinese central bank's efforts to contain inflation by limiting liquidity aren't working as intended. "Inevitably there is leakage," he says, adding that money supply has risen 52% in the past two years. "This creates a very powerful inflationary force. One way or another, goods coming out of China will cost more ... [and business] will go where costs are lower." China's "weak spots" are in low-margin manufacturing such as garments, toys, pharmaceuticals and foods, some of which could head to Vietnam, Indonesia and Sri Lanka, he notes.

    Lower costs alone will not tilt the scales, however. Many Western companies head to India for outsourcing manufactured parts and sub-assemblies because China lacks the required expertise. "We have been seeing increased activity in sourcing from India, primarily in components requiring some degree of complexity," says Ketan Chandarana, a partner at Synergy, a Bangalore-based consulting firm. Synergy advises mostly multinational firms in outsourced manufacturing. His clients prefer India also in cases that call for "sensitivity" to intellectual property rights and manufacturing in low-to-medium volumes with high degrees of variation in products.

    Among Synergy's clients is a Canadian maker of high voltage electrical equipment that two years ago needed a wide variety of components but in volumes ranging from a few hundred pieces to tens of thousands. "They tried to source from China, but were not able to get the quality levels and attention to detail," Chandarana notes. The company now sources brass components from Gujarat and Karnataka.

    India has traditionally had an edge in high-end manufacturing with lower volumes relative to China and design-intensiveness, according to Shah of IIMB. "India's problems are in low-end manufacturing, where wage costs play a role. Higher-end manufacturing is not that sensitive to wage costs." India will enhance its overall manufacturing competitiveness in the next five years, according to a June 2010 Deloitte study that gives China a current score of 10 in that area and 8.15 to India. Five years from now, however, the study projects India advancing to a score of 9, with China staying at 10. In addition to India and China, Korea, the U.S. and Brazil were ranked as Deloitte's top five countries in manufacturing competitiveness.


    Investing in India

    Global companies attracted to India's markets also realize they need to invest in local manufacturing for maximum advantage, according to Prabhudev Konana, a professor of business at the McCombs School of Business in the University of Texas at Austin. "You cannot tap a growing market by being outside. You want to be inside, closer to the market." All the major global automobile manufacturers, including General Motors, Ford, Nissan and Hyundai have invested in manufacturing in India with an eye on exports to third-country markets, he adds. It also helps that the Indian market "is very similar to a lot of Asian countries and Africa.... Roads are not wide and not designed for big vehicles."

    Chinese companies are not sitting quiet as their outsourcing clients get restive. "Chinese companies and the state, [which are] often hard to separate from each other, are aware of the pressures on their competitiveness, most immediately from rising wages," says Tarun Khanna, a Harvard University professor and author of the 2007 book, "Billions of Entrepreneurs," which tracks entrepreneurship trends in China and India. China has responded with two "structural" solutions, Khanna adds. "The first is to encourage a 'Go West' policy to tap into the still incredibly-large labor pools available in the western part of the country, a process now underway for some time. The second is to compel foreign investors to disseminate technology to domestic companies, so that the local entities can begin to compete on non-price dimensions and move up the proverbial value chain."

    Those new controls should be "serious food for thought" for multinationals entering China these days, according to Khanna. He also noted an increasing fear that foreign investors "will not be allowed to achieve critical scale in China." If MNCs get too big for comfort in China, the government could extend preferential treatment to local companies "to contain over-reliance on outside investors," Khanna says, a new approach that contrasts with China's pampering of foreign investors with tax and other incentives since seeking them out in 1980. China started phasing out incentives five years ago.

    India's reluctance in earlier years to welcome foreign investments brought unintended benefits in grooming local manufacturing, according to a 2003 paper titled, "Can India Overtake China," written by Khanna and Sloan School of Business professor Yasheng Huang. They wrote that as the Chinese economy took off in the past two decades, "Few local firms have followed, leaving the country's private sector with no world-class companies to rival the big multinationals." By contrast, India "took a dim view of Indians who had gone abroad, and of foreign investment generally, and instead provided a more nurturing environment for domestic entrepreneurs. In the process, India has managed to spawn a number of companies that now compete internationally with the best that Europe and the U.S. have to offer."

    A Second Sourcing Destination

    Emory's Sheth offers four reasons for India becoming a second sourcing destination. For one, India's large market for everything from cars to cell phones will attract investments in capacities that will be used also to supply West Asia and Africa. Secondly, as China grows, it will "selectively divest low-end manufacturing to other parts of the world to protect its own resources." Third, by using modern manufacturing techniques to tap into its vast agricultural and industrial resources, India can lower costs and improve its competitiveness. His fourth reason: "India is becoming a strategic alliance partner with America," the world's largest market. He sees India and China sharing a common destiny along with America as partners.

    Some of initiatives currently underway, including a plan to implement a uniform goods and sales tax and a direct tax code, could help boost India's manufacturing competitiveness, Shah of IIMB notes. Dedicated freight corridors along eastern and western India totaling 2,762-kilometer (1,716 miles) would increase freight movement capacity, although they are set to open no earlier than 2017. India's latest budget also allocates Rs. 500 crore (US$110 million) for the government's National Skills Development Fund, which has a target of providing job training to 500 million people by 2022. The University of Texas' Konana would like to see that implemented with missionary zeal. "For China, it is an obsession; they are training large numbers of people with passion. One CEO told me they are teaching English in stadiums in China."

    China's latest challenges do not translate into automatic wins for India, warns Khanna. "Can India benefit from this re-calibration? In a sense, yes, but probably no more than before." The primary deterrent to investment in India "will be internal to India," he notes, listing "good infrastructure" and "low-hassle processes" as the chief inducements. Investors are also wont to make politically correct noises about the need for democratic institutions and transparent processes, but they sometimes ring hollow, says Konana. "Most U.S. companies love China because it provides stability. That is where I see the hypocrisy. India is a democracy but they don't like the uncertainty [that goes with the territory]." :coffee:

    Will India Match China's Manufacturing Might? - India Knowledge@Wharton
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2013
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    India tops world murder count


    TNN Jun 2, 2008, 12.50am IST





    NEW DELHI: India has earned the dubious distinction of being the country where maximum number of murders takes place in the world, three times more than its neighbour Pakistan and double the figures in United States.

    There were more than 50 lakh incidents of crime reported in 2007-08 which included murder, rape and drug offences, a government report said. There were 32,719 incidents of murder recorded in India, whereas there were 16,692 in the US and 9,631 in Pakistan, the report compiled by National Crime Records Bureau and released by the Union Home Ministry, said.
    India tops world murder count - Times Of India
     
  10. kaku

    kaku BANNED BANNED

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    AV, this is five year old news.
     
  11. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    now compare those numbers with the population of each country :evilgrin:
    inidian population - 12410000.000000002
    US population - 3139000
    pakistani population - 1767000
     
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  12. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The definition of murder and rape differ from county to country.
     
  13. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    look don't repeat the same shiits again and again :tsk:. always remember, "a murder means when someone's death is caused by someone else, and a rape means when its fully penetrated etc, as we discussed before too." different circumstances are considered in India too, US is not any country living in different planet :wave:

    here, we had first news which confirmed only 799 murders in India while the same in US was well above 11,000+ by guns only, as discussed before??? while it had a more reliable source, The Reuters????? this does mean that there might be at least 10,000 more murders in US by other sources, even if we exclude 20,000+ suicides by guns only??????

    and yes, you can't compare India with Bhutan, as discusses before, as India has more than 36 states, which are more populated than Bhutan?

    even in this certain news you brought here, we still find difference between non-Welfare civilized society of India, w.r.t. to uncivilized but highly armed Welfare Society of US as below:


    Comparison based on per 100,000 (lakh) people

    1st,
    here, Rapes in uncivilized Welfare society of US = 93,934/ 3000 (100,000) = 30.3 :usa: :toilet:

    Rapes in civilized India = 18,357/ 125,00 (100,000) = 1.47 :india:


    2nd,
    Total Murders in uncivilized Welfare society of US = 16,692/ 3100 (100,000) = 5.38 :usa:

    Total Murders in civilized India = 32,719/ 12500 (100,000) = 2.61 :india:


    3rd,
    total crimes in uncivilized Welfare Society of US = 2,31,13,708/ 3100 (100,000) = 7456 :usa: :toilet:

    total crimes in civilized India = 50,26,337/ 12500 (100,000) = 402 :india:


    => India tops world murder count - Times Of India


    => and yes its a truth that all these dramatic increase in Murders, crimes, especially Rapes, started during last 7-8 years only, check the data's. we even find India to be dropped 25 points on the corruption ranking in just 5 years, out of hardly 180 countries, as below. the very first outcome of inviting the Western Culture and their all the good and bad :tsk:

    and i have said before, if the Indian government doesn't take proper steps to control influence of Western Culture, then soo they will have to build more jails for those people who dont even have house, and living in slums :toilet:

    India 72 in corruption index in 2007

    India ranked 94th in Corruption Perception Index ratings by 2012
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2013
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  14. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    one day we discussed that, "you can't compare yourself with the Western nation in terms of 3 criterion, the Murders, the Rapes, and the Wars." :wave:

    for example of US itself, almost every US's origin, excluding the migrants, keep guns, and ready anytime :usa:. even 20,000+ suicides a year by guns only, but the "GUN", is the main player :usa:

    and as they get enough Social Security+Free Medical etc, so they are mainly 'credit card' society, hence less corrupt this way. true.... its also true that, if they don't get Welfare then they can't understand, "why to maintain peace if no Welfare?"

    for example, we find a dramatic increase in local militia since 2008 recession, as below too :usa:





    => its so simple, even if we watch a 35 year old Indian movie of Mr Bharat Kumar (Manoj Kumar), the "Poorab Aur Pushchim", or a 60 year old movie of then Indian Show Man, Mr Raj Kapoor, "Jis Desh Me Ganga Bahti Hai." even the generations of India know that Western nations always use the guns first to get the work done..... you just compare yourself with the "WEST" in terms of murders, rapes and wars, no matter how much Welfare you provide them :nono:
     
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  15. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Finance ministry verifying outward remittances made in 2011-12 fiscal
    Jun 14, 2013

    NEW DELHI: The finance ministry is verifying outward remittances worth Rs 3.56 lakh crore ($70billion+) from India during 2011-12 as a major portion was not subject to tax deduction at source, an official said on Friday. :facepalm:

    "The finance ministry is currently engaged in verifying the remittances made abroad from India as over 70 per cent of remittances going out of India during the financial year 2011-12 were without any tax deduction whatsoever,:toilet:" director income tax (International Tax), MS Ray said at an Assocham event today.

    For 2011-12, there were 7,56,741 foreign remittances made from India with money worth Rs 3,56,461 crore going out of India, he added. (exchange rate in 2011, US$1.0 = Rs 50.)

    Ray said: "...out of this, tax deduction at source (TDS) made was Rs 12,676 crore representing just three per cent of the total remittances going out of India."

    He said that the income tax department is making efforts to verify the remittances and organising seminars and campaigns to spread awareness about consequences of withholding taxes in smaller towns.

    These efforts are paying rich dividends, he added. Ray said that awareness about TDS, mainly in smaller towns and cities is not up to the desired levels. This is especially seen in places such as Ludhiana with large population of non-resident Indians, he added.

    "The NRI population in these places is selling properties but while remitting the sale proceeds, people are not aware that TDS has to be made," he added.

    Speaking about characterisation of income through royalty and fees of technical services, he said this is a major area of litigation and needs a coherent approach and understanding from both tax authorities and tax payers.

    Ray added that the department is providing various mechanisms for greater certainty in taxation and reduction in litigation.

    Finance ministry verifying outward remittances made in 2011-12 fiscal - Times Of India
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
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