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LCA Tejas Naval Variant

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by hotstud69, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. hotstud69

    hotstud69 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

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    Last edited: Jul 6, 2010
  2. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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  3. Desi Jatt

    Desi Jatt Captain ELITE MEMBER

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    @arjun MBT - I didnt knew it, but in this picture it seems its two seater...se the second pic from top
     
  4. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Yes buddy, go to the link I mentioned above, It has video Of The Ceremony, its a twin seater version... and its super cool:india:
     
  5. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Video


     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  6. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    High res pics

    EDIT: Already posted. Just 1 left

    [​IMG]
     
  7. gowthamraj

    gowthamraj Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    It is two seates trainer to train navy pilots in sky jump Before they go into mig-29
     
  8. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Not exactly, the Mig 29KUb on order by itself are the Twin seater trainer versions....
     
  9. booo

    booo Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    what is the difference between this and regular lca? any technical details? guys?
     
  10. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    1)LEVCON ( Leading Edge Vortex CONtroller ) is a deflectable aerodynamic device in wing apex region LEVCON surface is deflected +20 (down) to 30 (up) from its neutral position.Downward deflection of LEVCON is used for reducing aproach speed for carrier landing



    2)Recovery on the ship will be by using aircraft arrester hook engaging ship's arresting gear with 90m wire pull out,the aircraft will experience deceleration of nearly 4.5g during deck landing. also nose landing gear will experience higher loads due to a larger pitch moment at the instant of hook engagement



    3)Main and Nose undercarriage has been designed for a significantly higer sink rate of 7.5m/s arising out of the requirement of a fixed glide slope and flare less landing on a carrier deck. A new telescopic design has been adopted for LCA-NAVY .

    4)Auto throttle function reduces pilot load by maintaining constant angle of attack during the critical phase of a flare-less carrier landing

    5)Fuel Dump System enables safe landing by reducing weight in event of an emergency landing immediately after launch from Carrier

    6)Derived from the Air Force version it is a longitudinally unstable fly-by-wire aircraft, making it an agile war machine.

    7)Aircraft gets airborne over a ski jump in about 200 m and lands 90 m using an arrester hook engaging an arrester wire on the ship.

    8)auxiliary air-intakes, strengthened undercarriage and fuselage

    These are few Point which makes it unique :india:
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2010
    2 people like this.
  11. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    The major differences are:

    - nose droop for better visibility of the runway during landing.
    - LEVCON, the extension flaps on the wings near the fuselage, to increase the lift and increase the alpha of the aircraft.
    - strengthened airframe
    - harder landing gear
    - optimized air intakes
    - arresting hook
    - fuel dumping facility

    EDIT: Arjun beat me to it.
     
  12. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    :brushteeth:Is it?:brushteeth: , Heheh thanks:D
     
  13. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    LCA (Navy) Will Add Punch To Blue Water Vision

    India rolled out the naval version (NP-1) of its Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) on July 6 in Bangalore with Defense Minister A.K. Antony leading the team. With the air force version of LCA (Tejas) now months away from its much-awaited initial operational clearance (IOC), the NP-1 rollout was hailed as a significant new chapter in Indian aviation.

    Amidst all the feel-good news stories on NP-1 in India’s media, it was important to check the pulse of the user, who would eventually have the final say on the platform’s worthiness. AVIATION WEEK Senior Aerospace and Defense Correspondent (India) Anantha Krishnan M. caught up with Chief of Naval Staff (CNS) Adm. Nirmal Verma to learn the significance of the NP-1 rollout and the way ahead.

    AW: The LCA Navy was rolled out on July 6 after the project got the Cabinet Committee on Security’s nod in April 2003. How significant is this program for the Indian Navy?

    CNS: The LCA (Navy) was sanctioned in March ’03 [following] the success of LCA (AF) in January 2001. They were planned as a possible replacement to our aging fleet of Sea Harriers, which have been in service since the ’80s. The vision of the Navy has always been to be an effective force, and hence LCA (Navy) shall play an important role in our future carrier operations doctrine. The LCA (Navy) design specifically caters [to] the first Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC1) scheduled to be delivered by Cochin Shipyard Ltd by 2014. The aircraft is expected to have state-of-art sensors and weapons and would be an integral part of our air arm. LCA (Navy) would add punch to the Navy’s blue water vision.

    AW: What role has the Naval Project Team (NPT) based at the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) played in speeding up the program?

    CNS: The Naval Project Team is part of the LCA (Navy) Program office at ADA and is a composite team of scientists from ADA and field experts from the Navy. This team provides [the] Navy specific requirements during design and development in terms of domain knowledge and expertise. They have been involved in the development of the aircraft since its conceptualization and form an important part of the entire design and development team of ADA. The team is also monitoring the Shore Based Test Facility (SBTF) project coming up at Goa, and is working toward the interface of LCA Navy with our Indigenous Aircraft Carrier.

    AW: ADA says that the first flight of NP1 will happen by the end of this year, and NP 2 one year after that. Are you confident that these deadlines will be met?

    CNS: Unlike the LCA (AF), the LCA (Navy) experiences additional force during takeoff/landing, and requires increased cockpit vision and low speed maneuverability during carrier operations. These challenges are being addressed by ADA. We look forward to the day when the NP1 and NP2 take to the skies.

    AW: A Shore Based Test Facility (SBTF) is coming up at Naval Air Station Hansa, Goa, and is said to be only the third such facility in the world. In addition to LCA, will you use this facility for any other platforms?

    CNS: The Shore Based Test Facility at Goa will primarily be used to carry out extensive Carrier Compatibility Tests for present and future versions of LCA (Navy). Since the facility replicates the deck of an aircraft carrier, it is an excellent platform for maintaining currency for the aircrew and [a] training ground of [the] crew for carrier operations. This would reduce the training load on the carrier, thereby increasing her operational availability. The Shore Based Test Facility can be used for training requirements for the carrier borne fighter aircraft in our inventory, viz MIG 29K.

    AW: Tejas (IAF) had to go through various difficulties and the project invited a lot of negative publicity from the media and even at times from the user. In your view, what are the key things the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) must do for an early induction into the Navy?

    CNS: The design and development of a new state-of-art aircraft is a tedious and time-consuming process. ADA and HAL, having gained certain expertise during the development of the Air Force version of LCA, are better placed to carry out the design changes for the naval version. Putting the LCA (N) into “flight†trials and proving of carrier compatibility of the naval prototypes and meeting the specified naval mission requirements must now be one of the key thrust areas for the naval program.

    AW: How important is it for the Indian armed forces to support indigenous programs?

    CNS: The importance of self-reliance in well recognized by the armed forces and is being supported wholeheartedly. In order to [have] indigenization and self-reliance in defense production, a number of steps have been taken by the government in [the] recent past. As you are aware, the Kelkar Committee appointed by the government on the subject submitted its recommendation in 2005 for the purpose, and a number of these have been approved for implementation. Measures have also been recommended by the Standing Committee on Defense in its report of April 2009.

    Issues and concepts of indigenization, defense industry, R&D, [and] joint ventures, as well as policy frameworks are all interrelated. The Indian Navy has consistently supported all efforts in these linked areas, and this is borne out of the fact that we have made good progress in indigenous warship construction, though some areas related to capacity and timelines need to be addressed. We have also proactively pursued indigenization with respect to the induction of Arihant, as also in key areas of equipment and subsystems for warship and submarine construction. A number of DRDO projects have been proactively supported by us, and we will continue to assist all agencies, public and private, engaged in the process of indigenization. At the same time, we have to plan for alternatives when indigenous programs do not materialize as per projects time frames in order to ensure that requisite capabilities are inducted in time for operational requirements.

    AW: Many of our homegrown projects were always delayed. What are the main causes for these delays and what is your mantra to overcome this?

    CNS: There are a number of reasons for time and cost overruns in indigenous projects. These include technological and developmental challenges, current limitations of our defence industrial base, nonavailability in time of requisite materials and components, and procedural delays in some cases. Efforts have been made at various levels to address these key areas of concern. The Ramarao Committee recently submitted its recommendations on some of these areas, and the same are under examination by the Ministry of Defense.

    In December 2008, the Standing Committee on Defense submitted a report on ‘Indigenization of Defense Production – Public Private Partnership.’ The report highlighted the need for public-private partnership in defense production. Steps have been taken in the recent past to ensure greater participation by public and private industry. We need to enhance the vendor base and infuse competitiveness through private sector participation. Defense production, as a sum total of DPSU and private sector capabilities, would be increasingly relevant as an index of our indigenous efforts. To achieve desired levels of self-reliance, our R&D and industrial responses to the existing and emerging requirements of the services would need to be strengthened. The indigenization process must also ensure that requisite capabilities are inducted in time. The time taken from the “drawing board†to the “delivery†stage should be comparable to global standards, and processes related to specifications, design and production need to be made efficient and result-oriented.
     
  14. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    LCA (Navy) Chief's Speech On NP-1 Roll-out Day

    The following is the full text of the speech that was delivered by LCA-Navy programme director COMMODORE CD BALAJI on 06 July 2010 at the roll-out ceremony of the aircraft's first prototype, NP-1.

    In 2003, based on the progress made on the Air Force LCA Programme the Govt approved Phase-1 development of 2 LCA Navy Prototypes that would operate from an aircraft carrier with the concept of Ski-jump Take-off and Arrested Recovery (STOBAR). Navy actively supported this Challenging programme to design, develop, build and flight test a carrier borne aircraft for the first time in the country. The two prototypes under development would be used to demonstrate that the aircraft is capable of operating from a ship, i.e., carrier compatible.

    The question often asked is ‘what are the changes in LCA(Navy) in comparison to the Air Force version?’ Typically the aircraft will get airborne in about 200m over the ski-jump on the ship as against a land based take-off run of about 800m. Landing on the ship is with an arrester hook on the aircraft engaging an arrester wire on the ship and the aircraft stops in 90m which is about 1/10th land based stopping distance.

    Unlike shore based take-off and landing applications, typical ship borne requirements imposes large loads on the aircraft structure which entails new design. Also, the nose section of the aircraft is drooped down in order to have better pilot vision for ship landing. Whilst the external aerodynamic shape of the aircraft is same as the Air Force Trainer, the internal structure is entirely different due to larger loads resulting from carrier operations. However, all Mechanical, Avionics and Flight Control system layout are by and large common with the Air Force version. The design of LCA(Navy) has been performed in a 3Dimensional Computer Aided Design (CAD) concurrent engineering environment. A Digital Mock Up (DMU) of the aircraft was ultimately created which had all the internal equipment laid out. This helped in visualising possible areas of clash with various system groups and the structural interfaces due a possibility of ‘virtual walk through’. No physical mock up has been built. Due to first time design, there could be additional reserve factors taken as a conservative measure, but would be optimised based on experience in the future prototypes. This would result in significant weight savings.

    Areas identified as challenges over and above the Air Force Version were structural design, Landing gear design, arrester hook, introduction of a new control surface (LEVCON) and ski-jump take-off. A case in point for Naval specific activities was the development of large sized landing gear forgings. Midhani had to develop the special tooling and processes and provide the special steel forgings. In addition, Bharat Forge, Pune provided the near shaped forgings of the major landing gear elements. These have been fabricated at private companies at Hyderabad and landing gears have been assembled at HAL (Nasik). Some of the typical challenges encountered during the development cycle, resulted in them taking longer than anticipated. However, today these have been resolved and we all await the aircraft’s rollout in the presence of the Hon’ble Raksha Mantri and the Chief of the Naval Staff.

    In its primary role of Air to Air combat, the aircraft will carry both Close Combat Missiles (CCM) and Beyond Visual Range (BVR) Missiles. In its Air to Sea role, the aircraft will carry Anti Ship Missile (ASM). The aircraft can carry external fuel drop tanks to increase range and endurance. The aircraft can carry a wide variety of bombs based on role requirement.

    To meet specific Naval testing, new test facilities have and are being developed. A new landing gear drop test facility has been created to handle testing to Naval requirements for qualifying larger landing gear loads. A hardware-in-loop simulation for flight control system testing called ‘Iron-bird’ has been set up and functioning. In this facility, entire hydraulics, flight control system and avionics would be integrated for the evaluation of the software. The Avionics and Weapon test rigs have been suitably modified to test the changes in system layout and architecture required for the Naval version. Shore Based Test Facility (SBTF) to simulate an aircraft carrier with ski-jump and arrested recovery is being set up at the Naval Air Station at Goa. The ski-jump facility is expected to be ready by the last quarter of 2011 and the landing area a year later. Goa Shipyard Ltd is handling the complete structural work, system integration and operations. R&D Engineers and CCE(R&D) west Pune are handling the civil works. Specialised equipment supply is from Russia in order to have the same configuration as on the Vikramaditya.

    It is critical to demonstrate carrier compatibility to infuse confidence in the Indian Navy that we indeed have a Carrier borne aircraft and towards that it is critical to demonstrate ski-jump take off and validate the simulations that have been carried out by the control Law team. Navy has defined the Mission and Performance requirements expected of the aircraft. As mentioned earlier, due to first time design, there may be shortfall in certain parameters with the current engine. Two more LCA(Navy) prototypes has been sanctioned by the Govt in Dec 2009 with a higher thrust engine to enable meeting the Mission objectives set out by the Navy.

    The act of ‘Rollout’ is a significant milestone in the development process of an aircraft wherein it is structurally complete, equipment installed, plumbing and wiring completed. The aircraft is on its wheels and can be moved by assisted power and is a precursor to the phase of ground based system integration testing leading the engine ground run, taxi tests and flight. Every effort is being made by all the stake holders to have the maiden flight in 3 to 4 months time.

    This day of NP1 rollout has been possible with the active involvement of HAL as the Principal Partner of ADA and support by DRDO, CSIR labs, CEMILAC, DGAQA, Public and Private sector industries, Educational Institutions and a host of other agencies. I wish to salute all of those who have contributed as a composite LCA Navy Team in realising this important milestone and look forward to the same spirit to take the aircraft towards its maiden flight at the earliest.

    LiveFist - The Best of Indian Defence: LCA (Navy) Chief's Speech On NP-1 Roll-out Day
     
  15. itzmylyf

    itzmylyf FULL MEMBER

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    Even though the NLCA is small I think it can carry air launched Exocet missiles if we buy them. I believe we are getting the sub launched variants with scorpenes. It has weight under 1500lb so can be carried in center line pylon.
    Size is also not large like brahmos so it wont be a problem.
    Is there any chance getting air launched harpoons with poseidons. They are good and if US allows,it can be integrated on NLCA making a common anti ship platform.Air launched klubs will be quite long and heavy for this bird.
     

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