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LCA Tejas Naval Variant

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by hotstud69, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    This is my opinion and I did ask my coursemates in IN and also program incharge of N-LCA. They had no answer.
     
  2. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    According to me it's political.

    By supporting the LCA, the navy will be able to force the IAF to accept coastal defence fighters. The AF doesn't want the navy to purchase aircraft exclusively for land based operations. But MoD cannot reject if the navy wants the LCA, since it is indigenous.

    So it's a huge PR advantage both within and outside the military if the navy goes for the LCA, regardless of whether it is useful or not.
     
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  3. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    Yes, This is the main reason. IN does not have the mandate to defend the airspace within our territorial limits. IAF has it. IN wwants to take over coastal defence itself and in that N-LCA is a pawn to get things going. Even the sea strike role is with IAF till date while it should rightfully belong to IN. IN has P-8I which carries Harpoon for sea strike. IN should operate the sqn of SU-30MKI which is tasked for sea strikes.
     
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  4. nair

    nair Die hard Romeo Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    IN is known for using the resources very well.....I agree having NLCA would give them the advantage of operating LCA for coastal defense....... IN has a decent amount of experience handling air crafts and with the kind of threat we possess, i guess IN would be capable of handling it.... IAF can focus on west and northern areas......
     
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  5. nair

    nair Die hard Romeo Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    If not su 30, mig 29's shouldnt be a big deal...... they already operate them for past few years.....
     
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  6. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    That will lead to another big and useless turf war, like the attack helicopters. And then they will take 10 years to fix it.

    Rather IN can focus on getting the Rafale for now, without bothering the IAF, and once the navy gets a large fleet 10 years down the line, IAF won't need special squadrons for sea strike.
     
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  7. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Yeah, IAF can completely focus on the real security threats while the navy can sail around the IOR and play power projection with other countries.
     
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  8. nair

    nair Die hard Romeo Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    I agree.... We all know the Ego of IAF...... They wont allow that to happen...... That is why i suggested mig 29,
     
  9. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Mig-29 for the IN? Nah, it's very old tech. It's quite old to face even current 'modern' threats and practically useless against major threats beyond 2030. Even if they upgrade it, it will only be inferior to the Rafale with little life left.
     
  10. nair

    nair Die hard Romeo Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    I was looking at short term plans, not long term.... Long term things would be totally different, especially once we decide the plat form on Vishaal......
     
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  11. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    IN has to start working now if they want to get planes for the Vishal. That's how long it will take to order, take delivery and then get pilots trained before they can be put on the carrier.

    Even in the short term, IN is short by 1 or 2 squadrons for IAC-1. Otherwise they will have to operate with just 1 squadron of Mig-29 each on the Vik and IAC-1. So technically, IN needs 18 Rafales immediately.
     
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  12. dadeechi

    dadeechi Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  13. IndoBot

    IndoBot FULL MEMBER

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    This reminds me of a very famous dialogue from 'Border' -

    Hum hi hum hai toh kya hum hai ... tum hi tum ho toh kya tum ho

    images.jpg
     
  14. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    [​IMG]

    On Tuesday here at the Aero India show, Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar added the latest in the series of nails in the coffin of the troubled LCA Navy, the carrier version of India’s in-service LCA Tejas. By now, the LCA Navy team in Bengaluru had gotten round to the reality that a paper plane that began in 2003 wouldn’t ever be an operational jet with a customer. Parrikar cajoled the team separately, assuring them that the government had no plans to pull the plug, and that the good work the team at the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) had done for over a decade would not go to waste. But the reality stuck. All that work on LCA Navy Mk1 wouldn’t result in sales of the aircraft. It would be forever be a technology demonstrator.

    The last six months have brought headwind way beyond what this little jet was built for. But beyond the claimed stoicism of continuing endlessly with a project nobody wants, there’s a reality that has gone unreported so far. A reality that provides the first solid hope for a project that’s as good as dead but for an honour lifeline from the Department of Defence Production. And here’s the thing: it isn’t pity at all. Livefist met with ADA chief Commodore C.D. Balaji for what he described after as the frankest chat he’s had on the subject. And at the centre of the LCA Navy’s struggle for relevance is a solid kernel of hope.

    The ADA has opened dialogue with the Indian Navy with the hope that its customer will come round to the view that the LCA Navy Mk.2 will be a sensible graduated step to the big twin engine jets it finally wants to operate. “The LCA Navy Mk.2 would be a great stepping stone,” Balaji tells Livefist. And he’s backing his pitch with a solid timeframe.

    ‘We’re aiming for a first flight of the LCA Navy Mk.2 in late 2020 or early 2021. The detailed design will be complete by 2019. To save time, we’ve already ordered raw materials required,’ Balaji says. Two GE F414 engines — one for the AF prototype and one for the LCA Navy — arrived earlier this month, the first batch of eight engines contracted from GE for the Mk.2 programme. That the LCA Navy will be a more powerful combat jet is well known. What Livefist has now discovered from the team is that there are design and engineering improvements being effected on the LCA Navy Mk.2 that could prove dealmaker if they work out.

    For starters, the team plans to move the wings outboard by about 350mm, increasing the space significantly between the fuselage and the wings. This would immediately optimise load transfer (the ADA has had weight issues with the landing gear) and free up the central fuselage for fuel. ‘We believe the change will free up space for up to 700 kg additional fuel, providing about 22 minutes of additional time on task,’ Balaji tells Livefist. That’s huge for the tactical envelope the LCA platform was developed for.

    But there’s a great deal of work left on the LCA Navy Mk.1 before the Mk.2 can begin taking shape. In the immediate future this summer, the LCA Navy Mk.1 prototypes will begin ‘taxi in engagement’ drills, where the jets are throttled on ground into the arrester wire at Goa’s Shore Based Test Facility (SBTF) to exercise structural compatibility for a hook. The tests have been delayed three months thanks to a damper failure during field carrier landing practice (FCLP) dummy approaches last year.

    ‘Our focus with the Mk.1 is carrier suitability. We’ve got a good handle on carrier ops. Control laws have matured well, and sit right on top of our simulations. Deck recoveries are a different challenge and there are several lead-up activities planned,’ he says.

    The ADA has built a new test rig to test horizontal and vertical loads during a deck recovery, including 7.1 m/s sink rate and the 45 ton load on an arrester wire. ‘Structurally, everything checks out,’ Balaji says, adding, ‘We are doing more dummy approaches to fine tune our control laws. Want to narrow everything down so we have very predictable landings.’

    Balaji smiles when pushed on the question of the Mk.1 and whether they are hoping for anything to come of it. ‘Saab has a Sea Gripen concept. They are in the same stage we were at in 2003 when we decided to create a carrier-capable derivative of the LCA Tejas. We have proven many technologies. The LCA Navy Mk.2 will incorporate every lesson we could possibly have learnt,’ he says.

    There’s activity on the radar front too. Balaji’s team will freeing up LCA Tejas LSP-2 shortly for ground integration of India’s indigenous Uttam AESA radar. The ADA has asked the DRDO’s LRDE lab to keep the Uttam’s interfaces as similar as possible to the current system. ‘It will be a challenge, moving from a mechanically scanned radar to the AESA without interface changes but that is the attempt, to save time and forestall any structural changes to the aircraft or radar,’ says Balaji. Interestingly, since the LCA doesn’t have an integrated liquid cooling system necessary for an AESA radar, the team has suggested that a small auxiliary compartment that becomes redundant after the mechanical-to-AESA switch could be utilised to house a liquid cooling system.

    A full scale model of the LCA Navy Mk.2 will be ready by early next year. Commodore Balaji and his team now hope their case will have a firm taker by then.

    http://www.livefistdefence.com/2017/02/revealed-the-indian-lca-navys-big-fight-back.html

    @Abingdonboy @Ankit Kumar 001 @nair @Agent_47 @Picard @Picdelamirand-oil @vstol jockey @Gessler @randomradio @MilSpec @BON PLAN @CNL-PN-AA @Robinhood Pandey@Levina @Hellfire @GuardianRED
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2017
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  15. bharathp

    bharathp Developers Guild Developers -IT and R&D

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    UTTAM is ready to be integrated on to an LSP? not a TD? was it already flown on a TD ? is LSP the same as the SP's that are going to the IAF sqdns?
     

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