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Mega Thread-India Pakistan Nuke Scenario..NFU/massive Retaliation/ decapitating strikes/scenarios

Discussion in 'Indian Military Doctrine' started by nik141993, Mar 19, 2017.

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Should India abandon its ‘no first use’ nuclear policy?

Poll closed Jul 19, 2017.
  1. Yes

    21 vote(s)
    31.3%
  2. No

    15 vote(s)
    22.4%
  3. Should keep an ambigious Policy

    19 vote(s)
    28.4%
  4. Threat Specefic Policy

    12 vote(s)
    17.9%
  1. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India modernising its nuclear arsenal with eye on China instead of Pakistan: US nuclear experts
    India continues to modernise its atomic arsenal with an eye on China and the country's nuclear strategy which traditionally focused on Pakistan now appears to place increased emphasis on the Communist giant, two top American nuclear experts have said.

    By: PTI | Washington | Updated: July 13, 2017 11:03 am
    [​IMG]India’s nuclear strategy, which has traditionally focused on Pakistan, now appears to place increased emphasis on China, the two experts claimed. (File photo)
    RELATED NEWS
    India continues to modernise its atomic arsenal with an eye on China and the country’s nuclear strategy which traditionally focused on Pakistan now appears to place increased emphasis on the Communist giant, two top American nuclear experts have said. An article published in the July-August issue of the digital journal ‘After Midnight’ has also claimed that India is now developing a missile which can target all of China from its bases in South India.

    India is estimated to have produced enough plutonium for 150–200 nuclear warheads but has likely produced only 120–130, wrote Hans M Kristensen and Robert S Norris in the article-“Indian nuclear forces 2017″. India’s nuclear strategy, which has traditionally focused on Pakistan, now appears to place increased emphasis on China, the two experts claimed. While India has traditionally been focused on deterring Pakistan, its nuclear modernisation indicates that it is putting increased emphasis on its future strategic relationship with China,” they wrote.

    “That adjustment will result in significantly new capabilities being deployed over the next decade that may influence how India views nuclear weapons’ role against Pakistan,” they said.

    Noting that India continues to modernise its nuclear arsenal with development of several new nuclear weapon systems, the two experts estimate that New Delhi currently operates seven nuclear-capable systems: two aircraft, four land-based ballistic missiles, and one sea-based ballistic missile. “At least four more systems are in development. The development program is in a dynamic phase, with long-range land- and sea-based missiles emerging for possible deployment within the next decade,” it said.

    India is estimated to have produced approximately 600 kilograms of weapon-grade plutonium, sufficient for 150–200 nuclear warheads; however, not all the material has been converted into nuclear warheads, it said. Based on available information about its nuclear-capable delivery force structure and strategy, we estimate that India has produced 120–130 nuclear warheads, the article said adding that the country will need more warheads to arm the new missiles it is currently developing.

    Kristensen and Norris said that the two-stage, solid-fuel, rail-mobile Agni-2, an improvement on the Agni-1, which can deliver a nuclear or conventional warhead more than 2,000 kilometres is probably targeted on western, central, and southern China. Although the Agni-4 will be capable of striking targets in nearly all of China from northeastern India (including Beijing and Shanghai), India is also developing the longer-range Agni-5, a three-stage, solid-fuel, rail-mobile, near-intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of delivering a warhead more than 5,000 kilometres (3,100-plus miles), it said.

    “The extra range will allow the Indian military to establish Agni-5 bases in central and southern India, further away from China,” the research article said.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/wo...stead-of-pakistan-us-nuclear-experts-4748319/
     
  2. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    ‘It’s India’s nuclear power that Pakistan fears’: Highlights from Shahid Khaqan Abbasi’s first international interview
    Published September 21, 2017 SOURCE: FIRST POST
    [​IMG]
    In his first international television interview as the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Shahid Khaqan Abbasi dismissed US’ allegations that the country was hosting terrorists on its soil. Speaking to CNN International, Abbasi maintained that, despite differences, Pakistan was together with US on its stand against terror. Abbasi spoke to the channel on the sidelines of the 72nd session of the UN General Assembly. Abbasi told CNN International that his country was an ally in the war against terror and it viewed India as a threat instead. Here are the highlights from the interview:

    On Pakistan-US ties

    Abbasi said that 70-year-old relationship between Pakistan and US’ relationship had seen its own ups and downs and Afghanistan was not the only thing which defined the situation. “We have always been an ally, especially a partner in the war against terror. We may have difference of opinion, especially based on the modalities of how we operate, but we want to work with the US to counter this menace of terrorism,” the prime minister said. Abbasi, who replaced deposed prime minister Nawaz Sharif in August, had met US vice-president Mike Pence on the sidelines of the General Assembly on Tuesday. Pence briefed Abbasi of ways that Pakistan could work with the United States and others to bolster stability and prosperity for all in South Asia. It was the highest contact between the two countries since Trump announced his new policy on Afghanistan and South Asia in August where he warned Pakistan for the nation’s continued support to terrorist groups. Trump had said that Pakistan had much to “gain from partnering with our effort in Afghanistan,” much to the dislike of Pakistan. During his meeting with Pence, Abbasi also expressed concern over the greater role that Trump advocated for India in his new Afghan policy. Interestingly, Trump in his maiden speech at the General Assembly on Tuesday touched upon the subject of countries acting as ‘safe havens’ for terrorists. In a not-so-veiled reference, Trump referred to countries who are sheltering, supporting and financing terror groups like Al Qaeda and warned them. On 30 August, Pakistan’s National Assembly had passed a resolution dismissing South Asia policy. The lawmakers said it was a lack of respect from Washington for the country’s sacrifices in the war against militancy and its successes against groups like Al Qaeda, Islamic State or the Pakistani Taliban.

    ‘India as a threat’

    Rejecting US’ claim that Pakistan was not taking enough measures to stop terror on its soil, Abbasi said that terrorism is a threat for everyone. “For us, India was the force that we have fought three wars with. India is a threat to Pakistan, we accept that,” Abbasi said. He explained that it was India’s nuclear power that Pakistan feared. “We have to defend ourselves several times. We developed nuclear weapons against the threat that India posed,” the prime minister said. At an event organised by the Council on Foreign Relations on Wednesday, Abbasi had also affirmed that Pakistan had developed short-range nuclear weapons as a counter to the India’s Cold Start doctrine. At the same event, he also alleged that the Indian aggression along the Line of Control (LoC) was meant to draw attention away from the actual struggle of the Kashmiris “who have today risen against the Indian occupation there.” Demanding the implementation of the UN Security Council resolution on Kashmir, Abbasi had also maintained that Pakistan wanted normal relations with India “but on the basis of trust and respect.”

    Trump and terror

    Speaking on US’ earlier move to suspend military aid to Pakistan, Abbasi said that his government expected no major change in US’ stand. “I met US vice president Pence on Tuesday and explained our role to him. We don’t expect a significant shift. We are willing to work with the US to fight the war against terror. The enemy is the same,” he said. Trump administration had in July decided to block $350 million in coalition support fund to Pakistan after denying that Islamabad had taken “sufficient actions” against Haqqani terror network. Speaking to channel, Abbasi added, “We are trying to work with President Trump. We listen to his viewpoint, speeches, policy statements. As Pakistan, we need to work with the US, on issues related to the world, especially terror.”

    On North Korea’s missile programmes

    Calling North Korea’s irresponsible firing of missiles “a cause of concern,” Abbasi expressed that Pakistan was against the country’s programmes. “North Korea needs to submit to the international regulatory authorities. We have not contributed to North Korea’s programme, that should be very clear. We have always stressed North Korea to behave responsibly, as per the world community wants,” he said. North Korea has received much criticism from other nations for carrying independent nuclear programmes, with the UN also imposing sanctions after its sixth and largest nuclear test. However, Pyongyang had defended its action saying that it was doing so to protect itself from “hostile” US forces.

    idrw.org .Read more at India No 1 Defence News Website http://idrw.org/its-indias-nuclear-power-that-pakistan-fears-highlights-from-shahid-khaqan-abbasis-first-international-interview/#more-148476 .
     
  3. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    I just don't know which end of their body do these Pakistanis think from? India will retaliate with city busters the moment these Pakistanis even think of using nukes on our forces. India nuke doctrine addresses the threat and actual use both.
     
  4. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    US spies had info on India’s nuclear missiles years before launch – NSA leaks
    Published time: 20 Sep, 2017 21:23
    Get short URL
    [​IMG]
    K-15 Sagarika, a nuclear-capable submarine-launched ballistic missile © missiledefenseadvocacy.org
    The Intercept last week, and traced back to the from National Security Agency’s Signal Intelligence Directorate internal newsletter, SIDtoday.

    Read more
    [​IMG]Greenwald: Terrorism used as ‘pretext’ for mass data collection
    The papers were part of the trove of documents that was handed over to journalists by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden in 2013, in one of the largest leaks ever of US intelligence data.

    One of the freshly released documents, titled “New collection access yields ‘spectacular’ intel,” has revealed US spying activities against India carried out by NSA sites abroad. It states that an NSA facility in Australia, codenamed RAINFALL, “had successfully geolocated signals of a suspected Indian nuclear weapons storage facility” in October 2004.

    A Thailand-based “Foreign Satellite collection facility” codenamed LEMONWOOD then collaborated with NSA’s Unidentified Signal and Protocol Analysis Branch at NSA in “isolating these signals” and confirming their relation to the Indian nuclear weaponry. Additional equipment was than deployed to LEMONWOOD to “expand the modest collection.”

    “Immediately after fielding this equipment, collection of this new network began to provide what is being called ‘spectacular’ activity,” the document said.

    READ MORE: CIA’s secret spy tool helps agency steal data from NSA & FBI, WikiLeaks reveals

    According to the Intercept, this activity eventually allowed the US to obtain data about the Sagarika and Dhanush nuclear-capable missiles, years before they were test-fired by the Indian military.

    Sagarika, a submarine-launched ballistic missile, has been in development since the 1990s. It was first successfully tested in 2008. The missile can be launched from both ground launchers and from underwater, and can carry a payload of up to 500 kilograms for a distance of up to 700 kilometers.

    READ MORE: Terrorism a lower threat 'even if 9/11 happened every year' – Snowden

    Dhanush, a sea-launched short-range ballistic missile, can carry the same payload of 500 kilograms up to a distance of 250 kilometers. It was first successfully test-fired in 2016, more than a decade after the NSA obtained information about the project.

    According to the SIDtoday article cited by the Intercept, the NSA had also obtained information “on India’s possession of two different types of airdropped bombs.”

    The first one was described in the paper as a “very large Fuel Air Explosive,” while the other one may have belonged to a “new generation of airdropped nuclear weapons.”

    https://www.rt.com/news/404008-india-nuclear-missile-us-nsa/

    More than the US spying on India's nuclear missiles which is a known and given fact, I am interested in knowing what type of Bombs the article is pointing at (highlighted in red). Can some one confirm?

    @vstol jockey @PARIKRAMA @Hellfire @Agent_47 @randomradio
     

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