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Narendra Modi’s $87 billion river-linking plan: These projects would help India fight floods, drough

Discussion in 'Internal Affairs' started by InfoWarrior, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Prime Minister Narendra Modi-led Centre is all set to start work on an estimated $87 billion plan to connect some of the biggest rivers of the country.
    By: FE Online | New Delhi | Updated: September 1, 2017 4:59 PM
    [​IMG] Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the Pratap Gaurav Kendra in Rajasthan. (Twitter/NarendraModi

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi-led Centre is all set to start work on an estimated $87 billion plan to connect some of the biggest rivers of the country within a month time, Reuters reported today. Government believes the ambitious plan would end the annual havoc created by droughts and floods in many parts of the country. This year itself, over 1000 people have lost their lives in floods in eastern as well as western parts of India. According to Reuters, Modi’s big plan involves linking of around 60 rivers across India, including the mighty Ganges. This is expected to help end farmers’ dependence on fickle monsoon rains, bringing millions of hectares of cultivable land under irrigation.

    The river-linking plan was first proposed Atal Bihari vajpayee-led NDA government at the Centre in 2002. Works couldn’t be carried out so far as states failed to end differences over water sharing contracts and clearances were stalled by the lazy bureaucracy. The news agency reported that PM Modi has personally pushed through clearances for the first phase of the project, which would also help generate thousands of megawatts of electricity.

    Here we take a look at the first phase of the ambitious project as well as similar such projects already being carried out by states:

    1. Ken-Betwa river interlinking project

    This project will involve construction of a dam on the Ken river, also known as the Karnavati, in north-central India and a 22-km (14-mile) canal connecting it to the shallow Betwa. Both rivers flow through vast swathes of Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh states, ruled by Modi’s BJP. The PM hopes this project would become a template for other proposed river interlinking projects.

    The 265-mile Ken flows through a tiger reserve. The government plans to clear out 6.5 percent of the forest reserve to build the dam, relocating nearly 2,000 families from 10 remote villages. Modi’s cabinet is likely to give its final go-ahead for the project within a couple of weeks.

    2. Projects to interlink Par-Tapi with Narmada and Daman Ganga with Pinjal:

    At present, the paper works to interlink Par-Tapi with Narmada and Daman Ganga with Pinjal are being completed, according to Reuters. These projects involve PM Modi’s home state Gujarat and neighbouring Maharashtra, both ruled by BJP.

    3. Godavari-Krishna interlinking in Andhra Pradesh

    Andhra Pradesh successfully finished the project to interlink Krishna and Godavari rivers this year. The project interlinking both rivers in AP’s West Godavari district was completed in a record time of around one year. The project was first visualised way back in the 1950s and revived during the first NDA regime led by Vajpayee.

    In June this year, PTI reported AP water resources minister Devineni Umamaheswara as saying the river interlinking project helped farmers in saving their crops from cyclone. “The diversion of water will benefit West Godavari, Krishna, Guntur and Prakasam districts,” he said, adding, “As a result of diverting 143 TMC water from Godavari to Krishna in the years 2015 and 2016 crops valued at almost Rs 8,500 crore were saved in the region.”

    4. Godavari-Penna interlinking project in Andhra Pradesh

    AP government has asked Water and Power Consultancy Services (India) Limited (WAPCOS) to prepare a Detailed Project Report (DPR) for supplying Godavari water directly to Rayalaseema. Expected to cost over Rs 80,000 crore, this project will interlink river Godavari with river Penna.

    5. Thamirabarani-Karumeniyar-Nambiyar rivers interlinking project in Tami Nadu

    The Tamil Nadu government is already working on the project to interlink Thamirabarani, Karumeniyar and Nambiyar rivers by excavating a new flood carrier canal from the existing Kannadian channel, which is one of channels of river Thamirabarani. The project has been in the pipeline since 2008. Then the estimated cost of the project was Rs 369 crore. The revised estimated cost for completion of the project is now over Rs 850 crores in 2017. The river interlinking project in the state gained momentum this year.

    6. Six more river linking projects in Tamil Nadu

    According to The Hindu, the state government is planning to carryout at least six river interlinking projects at a total cost of over Rs 9000 crore. These include Pennaiyar (Krishnagiri reservoir)-Palar link to transfer water from Krishnagiri dam to Kallar, a tributary of Palar; Pennaiyar (Sathanur dam)-Palar link to feed the Nandan Channed; Cauvery-Sarabanga link to boost irrigation potential in sub-basins fo Sarabanga, Thirumaniamutha and Muisiri.
    http://www.financialexpress.com/ind...ould-help-india-fight-floods-droughts/836773/
     
  2. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    PM Narendra Modi's Rs. 5.5 Lakh Crore River-Linking Plan For Tackling Floods
    The mammoth plan entails linking nearly 60 rivers, including the mighty Ganges, which the government hopes will cut farmers' dependence on fickle monsoon rains by bringing millions of hectares of cultivatable land under irrigation.
    All India | Reuters | Updated: September 01, 2017 08:58 IST
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    [​IMG]
    India river-linking project: A view of the Gangau dam in Daudhan village in Madhya Pradesh

    Daudhan, Madhya Pradesh:
    Highlights
    1. The mammoth plan entails linking nearly 60 rivers
    2. Government hopes this will cut farmers' dependence on monsoon rains
    3. PM Modi bets on the ambitious project to end deadly floods and droughts
    After years of foot-dragging India will begin work in around a month on an $87 billion (Rs. 5,55,593 crore) scheme to connect some of the country's biggest rivers, government sources say, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi bets on the ambitious project to end deadly floods and droughts.

    The mammoth plan entails linking nearly 60 rivers, including the mighty Ganges, which the government hopes will cut farmers' dependence on fickle monsoon rains by bringing millions of hectares of cultivatable land under irrigation.

    In recent weeks, some parts of India and neighbouring Bangladesh and Nepal have been hit by the worst monsoon floods in years, following two years of poor rainfall.

    Prime Minister Modi has personally pushed through clearances for the first phase of the project - which would also generate thousands of megawatts of electricity - the sources say, despite opposition from environmentalists, tiger lovers and a former royal family.

    That will involve construction of a dam on the Ken river, also known as the Karnavati, in north-central India and a 22-km (14-mile) canal connecting it to the shallow Betwa.

    [​IMG]
    PM Modi has personally pushed through clearances for the first phase of the river-linking project

    Both rivers flow through vast swathes of Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh, ruled by the Bharatiya Janata Party or BJP, and the prime minister hopes the Ken-Betwa scheme will set a template for other proposed river interlinking projects, one of the sources said.

    "We have got clearances in record time, with the last round of clearances coming in only this year," Sanjeev Balyan, the junior water resources minister, told Reuters. "The Ken-Betwa interlinking tops the priority list of the government."

    Government officials say diverting water from bounteous rivers such as the Ganges, Godavari and Mahanadi to sparse waterways by building a clutch of dams and a network of canals is the only solution to floods and droughts.

    But some experts say India would be better off investing in water conservation and better farm practices. Environmentalists and wildlife enthusiasts have also warned of ecological damage.

    BJP STATES FIRST

    The 425-km (265-mile) Ken flows through a tiger reserve nestled in a verdant valley. The government plans to clear out 6.5 percent of the forest reserve to build the dam, relocating nearly 2,000 families from 10 remote villages.

    Around half a dozen clearances, including on environmental and forest protection, have been obtained for the scheme to link the Ken and Betwa, according to two sources and documents seen by news agency Reuters.

    Prime Minister Modi's cabinet is likely to give its final go-ahead for the project within a couple of weeks, sources say, after which he will flag off construction at the site about 805 km (500 miles) from New Delhi, currently marked only by rows of red concrete slabs placed on the ground.

    The government is also finishing up paperwork on projects in western India linking the Par-Tapi with the Narmada and the Daman Ganga with the Pinjal. The projects involve PM Modi's home state of Gujarat and neighbouring Maharashtra, both also ruled by the BJP.

    The river-linking projects was first proposed in 2002 by the last BJP-led government. Work stalled because state governments sparred over water sharing contracts and clearances got stuck in India's notoriously ponderous bureaucracy.

    Ads by ZINC

    This time, officials hope starting with projects that are all in BJP-ruled states will smooth negotiations.

    Prime Minister Modi's government is touting the linking of rivers as a panacea to the floods and droughts that plague India every year, killing hundreds of people and withering crops.

    Large areas of eastern and north-eastern India are reeling under floods in which hundreds have died, while torrential rain also brought Mumbai to a standstill this week. Tamil Nadu, in contrast, recently rationed drinking water due to drought.

    Not everyone is convinced the projects should be the priority, however.

    "Theoretically we can't find fault with the plan," said Ashok Gulati, a farm economist who has advised governments. "But spending billions of dollars in a country which wastes more water than it produces, it makes more sense to first focus on water conservation."

    India, which has 18 percent of the world's population but only 4 percent of the usable water resources, perversely gives incentives to produce and export thirsty crops such as rice and sugar cane.

    TIGERS, VULTURES AND CANYONS

    The proposed 77-metre high (250-ft), 2-km long dam on the Ken River will submerge 9,000 hectares of mostly forest land. A big portion will come from the Panna Tiger Reserve, near the UNESCO world heritage site of Khajuraho Temple in Madhya Pradesh.

    The forest reserve, a major tourist attraction, is home to 30-35 tigers and nearly 500 vultures.

    "Building a dam in a reserve forest is an invitation to a grave environmental disaster," said Shyamendra Singh, the scion of the Maharajas who ruled a princely state near Panna during the British colonial era. "It will lead to floods in the forest and drought in the downstream."

    Authorities say they have planned for the safety of tigers and vultures.

    People in Daudhan village, not very far from the Gangau dam built by the British in 1915, are ambivalent. With no access to electricity and other basic services, they want more information on what they will get in return for being displaced.

    "We never got to see electricity in our village," said village elder Munna Yadav, gesticulating towards the Ken flowing a few metres from his thatched cottage. "If our children get to move out of this area and if the dam benefits everyone, we'll not oppose it."

    (Reporting by Mayank Bhardwaj; Editing by Krishna N. Das and Alex Richardson)

    © Thomson Reuters 2017
    https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/pm-...ore-river-linking-plan-to-stop-floods-1744719
     
  3. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Here's Why The Idea To Link India’s Rivers Will Remain A Pipe Dream
    Besides huge economic costs and adverse ecological effects, these inter–basin water transfer schemes will be politically unfathomable for Narendra Modi
    Ashok Swain
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    While the Ganga-Brahmaputra basin is reeling under devastating flood for the last two weeks resulting in deaths of more than 1000 people, Narendra Modi government has once again revived India’s decades old plan of interlinking its major rivers. Though Indian government had the prior information at least a week before about the simultaneous peaking of flood water flow in both Ganga and Brahmaputra in the third week of August, it is difficult to comprehend that such a large number of human casualties has taken place. Instead of introspecting the failures in flood management and taking necessary steps for disaster adapting capabilities, the Modi government is trying again to flirt with the idea of connecting country’s rivers to divert surplus water to deficit regions.

    The news of regime’s renewed interest in this river linking project might divert the media attention from the failure of the government in flood management, but there is very little possibility of this grand plan being implemented at least in foreseeable future. The idea of connecting rivers of Indian Subcontinent has its roots in the thoughts of Visveswarya, the legendary engineer of early 1900. Based on that idea, the Indian National Perspective for Water Development framed in August 1980 outlined this river interlinking project. It envisioned linking 14 rivers from the Himalayas and 16 across the India peninsula to bring waters from one area with surplus supplies to others with not enough.

    In 2002, the Supreme Court of India ordered, in response to a public interest litigation on long period of inaction and lack of implementation of the proposed interlinking project, “We do expect that the program drawn up would try and ensure that the link projects are completed within a reasonable time of not more than ten years.” However, not much progress has been made on this grand plan. There have been some small-scale interlinking of rivers taking place within single states. In 2015, the Godavari and Krishna Rivers were linked by a canal in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh. A second project, the Ken-Betwa River link is being prioritized now to divert water from UP to MP. As both the states are under BJP rule, the BJP government at the center expects to push this project without much of opposition from state governments. Similarly, there is new interest in the proposal to connect Tapti with Narmada and Daman Ganga with Pinjal to facilitate interstate water transfer between two other BJP ruled states, Gujarat and Maharashtra.

    It appears that this Interlinking project, envisioned as a “surplus-deficit” problem with a techno-centric solution, is not only an inaccurate understanding of the problem but also a not a well thought out solution that is implementable. Before embarking upon these water transfer projects, Modi government needs to learn from India’s own historical experiences of water transfer from one state to another. The political sensitivities and environmental problems associated with long distance water transfer projects like Sutlej Yamuna Link, Indira Gandhi Canal and Telugu Ganga Project should be sufficient enough to deter the present government from carrying out any future projects of this nature.

    Ideas of linking rivers to equalize surplus and deficit of water are not new. In the 9th century BC, Assyrian Queen Sammu-Ramat, what is now northern Iraq had inscribed on her tomb: "I constrained the mighty river to flow according to my will and led its water to fertilize lands that had before been barren and without inhabitants." This idea has been picked up by numerous engineering schemes since the beginning of last century. But, very few largescale water transfer schemes have been successfully implemented.

    Many of these planned projects in different parts of the world have remained in the planning stage for long time. Russian authorities periodically plan but have been unsuccessful to revive an old scheme of water diversion from Siberian rivers to Central Asia, which was scrapped in 1986 by Gorbachev. In recent years, Turkey has also come up with a grand plan to divert water from its GAP project on the Euphrates-Tigris River system to Gulf countries. In July 2001, the US President George W. Bush had even publicly expressed his plan of persuading Canadian Prime Minister about piping Canadian water to the parched American Southwest, which was swiftly rejected by the Canadian Environmental Minister. Besides, high infrastructure and maintenance costs, such grand endeavors become more problematic when the water has to be exported across several political units.

    Only the authoritarian regime in China has managed to construct its mega South-North Water Diversion, a 2,400km network of canals and tunnels to divert water from China’s humid south to its parched, industrialized north. But, India is not a one nation, one language and one leader country like China. While flirting with this idea from time to time, authorities in India try to forget the ground political odds hugely stacked against its implementation. Besides huge economic costs and adverse ecological effects, these inter–basin water transfer schemes will be politically unfathomable.

    In India’s federal structure, a national consensus is required to plan the country as a single basin. While the water shortage states are strongly in favour of declaring major rivers as national assets, others, who have to contribute, resist the idea. Till now, there does not exist even a single river basin authority in India. Most of the states in the Indian Union are already engaged in bitter disputes with their neighbors over water resource allocation, interlinking project if taken up seriously will create new disputes and will also revive the old ones. Regional parties are in power in many of the ‘water surplus’ states, and that will make it further difficult for the center to carry out any planning on inter-state river linking. Unlike in the USA and Australia, where the judicial decisions on shared waters are accepted by disputing provinces, India does not enjoy that benefits as it has been noticed in the interstate disputes on Cauvery and Sutlej waters.

    There is no doubt that India’s river-linking plan is politically dangerous in nature, at the same time, it is neither economically feasible nor environmentally sustainable. There is a lack of technical information about the viability of the project given the estimated cost is whopping US$125 to 200 Billion. Beyond a few lines drawn on the map to indicate the rough location of the dams and the canals, nothing is available to independently verify the justifiability and efficacy of the various claims of benefits from the project. Moreover, increasing strength of environmental activism and anti-dam protests have made it almost impossible to build any large dams and water diversions projects in India. Even there is a growing resentment against the existing water diversion projects like Bihar has started blaming Farakka Barrage in West Bengal for increasing number of devastating floods in the upstream.

    India’s dream of linking of its rivers has also serious regional implications. Downstream riparian Bangladesh, which shares 54 transboundary rivers, is seriously worried about the impact of these river-linking projects will have on its people, economy and the environment. India’s 1978 plan to divert Brahmaputra water to Ganga also adds further to this insecurity. Any basin based comprehensive water allocation plan becomes further complicated as countries in the upstream, Nepal and Bhutan are reluctant due to their bitter experiences in the past over its joint water development projects with India. China’s recent dam building activities in the upstream of Indus and Ganga-Brahmaputra basin further complicates India’s grand dream of water diversion. Thus, it is most likely that Modi regime’s new interest in interlinking country’s rivers is just an attempt to manage the media discourse to divert the attention from its abject failure in rescue, response and recovery in the ongoing flood disaster in north and eastern parts of India, and not a serious desire to execute this highly challenging grand old dream.


    (The writer is a professor of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University, Sweden.)
    https://www.outlookindia.com/websit...indias-rivers-will-remain-a-pipe-dream/301157
     
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  4. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The river-linking plan, which involves building of dams and canals, is an avoidable misadventure
    The presumed role of dams and canals in the mitigation of the ill effects of floods and droughts is exaggerated. For example, Maharashtra has more than 1,800 of the total of 3,200 large dams in the country yet it is one of the most drought-affected states.
    opinion Updated: Oct 02, 2017 16:56 IST
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    A man fishes in the Ken river in Bundelkhand, Madhya Pradesh. The environment ministry has given the final approval for the Ken-Batwa river linking project. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)
    The deadlock between Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh over the ambitious Ken-Betwa river interlinking project has been resolved, MINT reported last week. What are we up to when we talk of the inter-linking of rivers (ILR)? More dams and canals to transfer water from one river into another, based on unscientific and unnatural principles, not to mention bad economics and the adverse social and environmental impact.

    We presume that water flowing in a river to the seas is a ‘waste’ and that there are ‘water-surplus’ rivers, which could be transferred to another ‘deficit’ rivers. It has also been claimed that the so called inter-linking would also rid the nation of the scourge of floods and droughts.

    Read more
    This is a wrong assessment since it goes against the critical and essential water cycle and the key role that the rivers play in it. Rivers are diverse because of their varied catchments. In India, there are 14 major river basins ranging from the Ganga basin (862,769 sq km) to river Subarnarekha (19,300 sq km). Each of these river basins big or small is an ecosystem with its own hydrology, geology, biology and ecological functions whose integrity must remain inviolate.

    As regards the presumed role of dams and canals in the mitigation of the ill effects of floods and draughts, it is a matter of record and experience that Maharashtra with more than 1,800 of the total of 3,200 large dams in the country remains one of the most drought-affected states?

    The Hirakud dam over Mahanadi in Odisha, which was built to control floods, has been the cause of massive flooding downstream. Experience indicates that while dams do stop low level floods, which otherwise are a boon to the farmers. These, in fact, turn high level floods into devastating ones through sudden and massive water releases.



    In short, ILR, which entails construction of large number of dams and canals criss-crossing the nation, is an avoidable misadventure.

    Manoj Misra is convener, Yamuna Jiye Abhiyaan

    The views expressed are personal
    http://www.hindustantimes.com/opini...isadventure/story-R0WAxWqEl0EjWBW75c7o4O.html
     
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  5. whitebeard

    whitebeard FULL MEMBER

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    This Commie crack pot Ashok SWINE didn't give a single reason to abandon this life changing idea in dis whole commie diarrhea op-ed, wasted 5 minutes.
     
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  6. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Ashok ' SWINE' and his anti-modi articles atleast spare the country .You dont like Modi its fine, but don't lie outright and insult country to score brownie points, That guy is a swedish citizen,he is more interested and writes,tweets about India than Sweden or Europe.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2017
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  7. Bloom 17

    Bloom 17 2nd Lieutant IDF NewBie

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    These writers receive donations from ngos run by “you know who” for every article they publish. And donations range from 1 lac to a Toyota Inova per article depending on who and where they write.
     
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  8. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    A Commie USSR once saved India in 1971, then villain was capitalist USA. A commie Russia still vetoes Kashmir at UN. Can we trust a capitalist USA ?
    When India boycotted OBOR, Trump changed his mind at the last moment and attended OBOR.

    Abe Makes a Surprise Appearance, Hails 45 Years of Japan-China Relations
    https://thediplomat.com/2017/09/abe...ance-hails-45-years-of-japan-china-relations/

    CPM once allied with BJP, against congress.(2008 nuclear deal with USA.)
    CPM doesn't mind voting with BJP
    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/CPM+doesnt+mind+voting+with+BJP/1/11515.html


    This guy is a professor at Upsala University( which is a topmost place of learning), his salary would be in lakhs, IQ in double digits. We should never ignore a smart critic. Even shastras say the same things, "critics are our friends, flatterers our enemies". Suppose this fails, RW political future will be in danger. Opposition will get a Brahmastra against BJP.
     
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  9. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    wow, look how commies have suddenly changed colors for survival
     
  10. _Anonymous_

    _Anonymous_ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    He should've come out with a viable alternative, in the absence of which the author comes across as an alarmist and a bit of a complaint box .
     
  11. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The writer is a critic of Hindutwa and Modi, but if he is right we should listen.

    BJP barely survived Demonetization failure in UP election. BJP won only because of Modi wave and polarization. Water issue is like electric fuse, because of a canal from Punjab to Haryana, Akali Dal lost to congress.

    In Punjab, Parties Fight To Take Credit For Denying Haryana Water
    https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/in-...take-credit-for-denying-haryana-water-1287932

    Many water surplus states have strong regional parties. For example if you divert water from UP to other states, SP-BSP will jump in and make it a political issue.

    SYL canal issue: 34 years, 3 Supreme Court orders later, link that can’t be made
    http://indianexpress.com/article/explained/punjab-sutlej-yamuna-canal-link-haryana-4368049/
     
  12. Satendra kumar

    Satendra kumar FULL MEMBER

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    I think the former prime minister,Atal's dream of joining all river's of India will come true,current Modi government will enchance these plan to ensure all river's at a cost of $80 billion,should go ahead making flood related disasters,deaths,making more economic friendly river's.By linking all river's will also boost agricultural production.Firstly it's a huge disaster management for all Indian societies.
     
  13. zebra7

    zebra7 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Thatsot Modi idea, rather this idea was proposed in 60s and premilary studies was carried out, and the project was put to the cold storage. Detailed feasibility studies should be done now, and the project should have been completed long ago, now will have inceased costing and more problems due to urbanization and human settlements.
     
  14. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Commies only side with others for survival.
    Stalin made a peace pact with Hitler ,later Stalin joined with Capitalist USA and Colonial UK to fight Hitler who was knocking on Moscow doors. USSR only voted and helped India because India made a defence pact with them in 1971, the same USSR Stood down while China attacked India in 1962 Indo-China war.

    The professor guy you mention, Upsala University might be top most in Sweden but not in the world it is ranked at 98 and 102 in world and 32 OR 34 in EU ranking. It is definitely not topmost. This guy is a Professor of Peace studies,what the hell is that subject even supposed to mean? Peace Studies ?:woot:
    He definitely,does not earn more than Doctors in Sweden a Average Doctor ,They earn at most 4000 euros Which is 3 lakh rupees. A Professor earns around 1 lakh in India as per UGC salaries. Then what the heck is this "He earns in lakhs " ?

    Life is good in India and you save more in India on expenses and cost of living at the end of the day a Professor in India saves more money than this Ashok 'SWINE' guy who will spend most of his salary for maintenance and upkeep of family if he got one. That is the reason he keeps writing about India and gets paid by Commie news portals for Anti-India and Anti-Hindu articles, before 2014 elections and Modi win nobody heard about this guy, after 2014 he jumped into news and started writing articles of how Modi and India,especially Hindus were bad for voting Modi to power.
    Critics are ok, but not paid critics and he definitely is not a smart one,because he ducks questions thrown at him. Regarding opposition, It has been trying its best to get a Brahmastra against BJP and has never found one,because there exists none and they can find no issue or cause to oppose against BJP other than siding with Anti-National agendas as a Opposition. We saw how opposition crumbled in UP elections and most importantly how opposition and Intolerance brigade writers returning their awards was neutralized when Nitish Kumar joined with Bjp this year. :fie::fie::rofl::rofl:
     
  15. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Yes true communists are opportunists, but capitalists are more opportunists, Everyone sides with others for survival. You should understand that USA has no love for India, its pure interest. USA just wants to use India against China. We should use USA for our gain, never depend on USA.

    Fine, I agree that this Ashok Swain is anti-BJP and most of his articles are criticisms of BJP. But demonetization didn't turn out like it should, BJP did make a mistake. BJP didn't recover the 3 lakh crores it promised to recover. If this river linking flops like demonetization BJP might not recover from this.

    I doubt Ashok swain is a communist, he seems more a congressie. Most communists are like AAP party, communists are honest to their ideology and least corrupt people in the world. Communists are very bad for business that's a truth.

    Having Nitish does not mean BJP has Nitish's vote bank. We should always expect the unexpected, I never thought Dangal would beat Bahubali, but Congress can't get votes from China.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2017

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