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Narendra Modi’s $87 billion river-linking plan: These projects would help India fight floods, drough

Discussion in 'Internal Affairs' started by InfoWarrior, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. Wolfpack

    Wolfpack Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Everyone is a opportunist, if you think Communists are less opportunistic than capitalists you are wrong,Communism tries to sneak into a country using local issues and tries to overthrow the country's ruling government using riots and so called revolution,if that is not opportunism,then i don't know what is.
    USA has no love for India and we know that too, there are only mutual interests no love in Geopolitics.

    What did you think Demonetization should have done? it did what was it was set to do,basically to bring stashed money into Public Sector banks and now banks are full of cash and interest rates are going down as banks are giving loans easily now. It also made sure E-Commerce went up by almost 60% GST made Maruti Suzuki profits of 23% as said by its CEO on tv.
    The river linking has not even started and already people are calling it a flop before it began.The lame excuses to not link rivers cited by opposition is destruction of a few frogs and shrimp. When river linking opens up new ports and makes inroads into shipping,tourism and bring water to rivers which have dried up. Farmers will have water all around the year to grow crops instead of waiting for rains.

    Congress and Communists are the same,that is why they support each other.Congress is busy looting money,while Communists are busy subverting student minds to finish Hinduism to bring in atheist communist rule. You should ask ex-communist countries and Ex-USSR nations of how corrupted the communists are.In communism only the topmost get benefits,while the bottom gets nothing, in Capitalism everyone can get a share if they work hard enough and there are checks and balances in Democracy to stop Corruption, you don't get such chances in Communist rule.

    Nitish made political calculation and understood being with BJP he will survive in future,he is not suicidal like Congress to oppose Modi just for the sake of it.

    Dangal is all hype, after hearing Bahubali success, Bollywood got heartburn ,especially since Bahubali was centered around Hindu culture and mythology. After its huge success critics were put to playdown Bahubali success ones like Anna Vetticad who was worried Bahubalis success will bring back Hinduism into forefront and Producers will start making movies that glorify India's past or Hinduism. She even agreed on twitter that she gave a bad review just to put down the overt display of Hindu iconography ,Kshatriya Dharma in that film as its success will be emulated in future,by making more such films, which is bad for 'Breaking India' forces who are out to finish Hinduism so they can soul harvest Hindus.
    It was also bad for Regional party players as Bahubali broke regional ,language barriers and got overwhelming success,
    You see the butthurt here displayed by Communists. I took the Paragraph below to point out why Communists, Jihadis and Breaking India forces were troubled by Bahubalis success. Read it yourself.

    To release such a film in Telugu and Tamil is nothing but a cultural Trojan horse of Hindi and Hindu nationalism, perhaps reasons for its wide success and critical acclaim across the ‘Indian’ media and the Hindi-belt.
    https://www.thequint.com/entertainment/baahubali-2-success-box-office-bollywood
    https://www.thequint.com/entertainm...ste-re-emerges-dont-forget-baahubali-casteism

    Dangal got hyped and producers started claiming it was successful over Bahubali,since Bollywood and Dawood gang which funds Bollywood was worried about shifting of Indian film Industry to regional film industry and South where Pakistan nor D-gang dont have a control on how Muslims are portrayed as instead of heroes like in Bollywood.
    So dont go by hyped PR campaign of Dangal,it was not a big hit as it was made out to be, it was just buttering up B-town,Amir Khan and D-company ego by projecting Dangal a bigger hit than Bahubali.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2017
  2. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Let's admit it Amir Khan is very good at making movies.

    What I have learn't is truth is always inbetween Left and Right views.
     
  3. HariPrasad

    HariPrasad Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Modi is a great visionary leader with an iron will to implement the plan. People will benefit immensely from his work where ever he is. He is a performer who works 24*7.
     
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  4. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...ng-in-assam/article20948196.ece?homepage=true

    Understanding the Brahmaputra and the annual flooding in Assam


    November 27, 2017 10:49 IST
    Updated: November 27, 2017 11:12 IST

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    Fishermen catching fresh water prawns with their valve trap in the Brahmaputra River in Morigaon district of Assam. Assam government has put a ban on catching fish during this fish breading season but fishermen still illegally catching fish for their lively hood. File | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar


    "The nature of rivers is such that there is no way one can flood-proof whole of Assam so one has to keep it mind that floods will happen," says an expert.

    “The river was swollen the morning after the earthquake, which seemed to last for an eternity. We saw fallen trees in it, people and animals flailing, dead bodies of people and animals that were carried on the strong current.”

    Krishna Chawla (née Das) was 13 when a strong earthquake that lasted about eight minutes jolted Assam and adjacent areas on the evening of August 15, 1950.

    The Brahmaputra River, which was always “eating away at parts of the state,” looked terrifying, she recollects. “All of us students went to help build embankments the next day, and while I was passing a bag full of sand to a fellow student, I saw the river take away the house I was born in. The house collapsed, and I stood there paralysed,” said Ms. Chawla, the daughter of a forest officer in Dibrugarh.



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    Gulzarilal Nanda, Union Planning Minister, visit a rapid survey of flood and erosion-affected areas of Assam on August 22, 1954. Photo shows the Union Minister (third from right) looking at the swirling Brahmaputra at Palasbari about 14 miles from Guwahati. | Photo Credit: The Hindu Archives

    The massive earthquake that ravaged Assam on Independence Day that year not only claimed over 1,000 lives, but also changed the course of the mighty Brahmaputra. The riverbed rose as the mountains shook, and what had been a stable course became a constantly shifting one eroding the banks.

    This especially increased the amount of silt carried by the river and its tributaries. The silt was deposited on the banks downstream, and on the riverbed. Due to this heavy deposition, the river "frequently changes its course with the main channel flowing into multiple channels" hitting the river bank causing further erosion, a study published in 2014 by the Civil Engineering Department, Royal Group of Institutions explains.

    The riverbed area of the Brahmaputra has increased by more than 50 per cent through erosion since the quake. According to a report on climate change published by the government of Assam in September 2015, erosion has destroyed more than 3,800 square kilometres of farmland, which is nearly half the size of Sikkim, since 1954. Due to erosion, the riverbed area has expanded from around 3,870 sq.km. estimated between 1916 and 1928 to 6,080 sq.km. in 2006. Based on the civil engineering report, between 1954 and 2008 about 4,27,000 hectares has been eroded at the rate of 8,000 hectares per year.



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    The human cost
    Lalita Biswas, 30, a daily wage earner at a brick factory in Morigaon, Assam, had to leave her submerged house in a village in Morigaon in a boat provided by villagers and take shelter in an open space on a nearby hillock. She was living in a polythene tent with her husband, who also works at the brick factory, and children. Her children have suffered from colds and fevers, and her family did not receive any help from the government, she said.

    “We’re always neglected because we are poor,” she said when asked if she had received any help from the state authorities. Ms. Biswas wasn’t alone. About 100 people climbed the hills to escape the flood and have to rebuild their houses and lives.

    have suffered from colds and fevers, and her family did not receive any help from the government, she said.

    “We’re always neglected because we are poor,” she said when asked if she had received any help from the state authorities. Ms. Biswas wasn’t alone. About 100 people climbed the hills to escape the flood and have to rebuild their houses and lives.


    A similar story was told by Nishikant Deka, 80, of Gorubandha, a village about 40 km from Guwahati. He and his 12-member family had to evacuate their house in neck-deep water and take shelter at a naamghar (public prayer hall). They managed to carry some rice, and food provided once in a while by NGOs kept them going. The head of the house described how almost every year the family has to reconstruct the bamboo home that floodwaters destroy.

    The government of Assam estimates that 2,753 human lives have been lost along with 6,73,329 cattle 2,753 human lives have been lost along with 6,73,329 cattle and the total losses due to floods and erosion amount to nearly ₹4659.472 crore. Flooding this year took the lives of 157 people and destroyed hundreds of acres of land. According to the state disaster management authorities, in the past five years, flooding has killed about 500 people.



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    Marooned houses in the flood affected Morigaon district of Assam. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar

    Controlling the floods


    One of the main methods used in the State to control floods is embankments, but almost every year the Brahmaputra and the Barak breach their banks, inundating agricultural land and houses. “The most recent embankments are 25 years old,” says Himanshu Thakkar, coordinator of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Checking embankments before monsoon should be done as we never know where it will be breached. When the flow is extreme, erosion capacity is greater,” he adds.

    In August this year, the State government announced that as many as five dredgers will be used to deepen the Brahmaputra, and the harvested silt will be used to construct the 725-km Brahmaputra Expressway along both banks of the river. In an earlier report, the Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal told The Hindu: “We believe it will not only improve the water-carrying capacity of the Brahmaputra, but also make the river navigable for bigger cargo ships. That used to be the case before Independence.”

    Sanjoy Hazarika, director of the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative is unconvinced. He is for an engineering assessment, along with environment assessment, as dredging “might change the course of river.” Mr. Thakkar adds that the way dredging is done followed by the construction of highway on both banks will determine the changes the river will see.

    The Brahmaputra Board, under the Ministry of Water Resources, had suggested constructing dams in Assam and Arunachal Pradesh about 30 years ago, the Subansiri project being one of them. Subansiri was initially designed as a hydro-power and storage dam, which the board believed would help reduce the impact of floods. However, it was later transformed into just a hydroelectric project aimed at generating 2000 megawatts of electricity, which invited opposition from local people and environment scientists.

    There is the possibility that hydro electric projects can worsen the situation. “Ranganadi project is a classic example of damage caused by the dam in downstream,” Mr. Thakkar points out. The dam in Arunachal Pradesh -- part of a hydro-electric project -- is on the Ranganadi tributary of Brahmaputra. During winter the river barely exists, but during monsoon it swells up, inundating villages. The All Assam Students' Union in July this year demanded demolition of the Ranganadi hydro project, alleging that release of water by the North Eastern Electric Power Corp. on July 11 without prior notice affected hundreds of thousands of people in Lakhimpur and Majuli, media reported.




    [​IMG]
    Sand is being dug from the river Brahmaputra due to massive siltation in the water ways in the outskirts of Guwahati on November 25, 2015. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar
    The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. Assam is home to more than 3,000 wetlands and many varieties of flora and fauna. “Wetlands, locally known as beels, act as reservoirs and rejuvenating them before monsoon can help in mitigating flood in parts of the state,” said Dulal Chandra Goswami, former head of department of environmental science at Guwahati University.

    “Wetlands play a very significant role as natural reservoirs of water that absorb part of the flood waters from the nearby rivers through their connected channels and also from surface runoff," Mr. Goswami explains. Most of these wetlands are in derelict condition mainly due to human-induced factors such as encroachment for agriculture or infrastructure development.

    “To mitigate floods, any potential practical solution should be based on an integrated, multidisciplinary basin management plan focused on water and soil conservation together with geo-environmental, eco-biological and socio-cultural integrity of the basin,” Mr. Goswami says. “The basin management approach is essential in view of the interstate as well as international character of most of the tributaries and the mainstream.”

    Effects of Climate Change
    Compounding the issue of an unpredictable Brahmaputra, is the effects of climate change. “Climate change will result in more frequent and severe floods, which will increase the costs of reconstruction and maintenance on state infrastructure, including roads, irrigation, water and sanitation,” says the report on climate change published by the Assam government.

    According to the study, by 2050, the average annual runoff of the river Brahmaputra will decline by 14 per cent. However, there is a risk of glaciers melting, leading to flash floods.

    As the economy of Assam is largely dependent on natural resources, what happens with agriculture and forests has direct effects on the livelihood of its people. During floods, water becomes contaminated, and climate change has a direct impact on the water resources sector by increasing the scarcity of freshwater, which is a constant problem in summer.

    “The predicted increase in average temperature and decrease in the number of rainy days due to climate change will further stress water resources,” the report points out.

    The study goes on to say that heavier rainfall replacing continuous low or normal rainfall during monsoon might lead to flash floods in low-lying areas. This will also reduce the groundwater recharge.



    [​IMG]
    The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. File | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar

    Change in approach
    While the present approach towards flood has been immediate relief, much more need to be done before torrential rains hit the State during monsoon. The short-term measures on which flood management in the State presently depends, such as rebuilding the breached embankments, are largely inadequate.

    Besides, more accurate and decentralised forecasts of rain can help in improving preparedness. “Weather reports should be made available on district level and should be accessible to public,” says Mr. Thakkar of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Information should be available in local languages. With the forecast in, one can calculate how much more water will flow downstream, thereby alerting people in advance to evacuate. The nature of rivers is such that there is no way one can flood-proof whole of Assam so one has to keep it mind that floods will happen.”

    He adds that the water flow information shared by China on the Brahmaputra with India, for which India pays a certain amount, should also be shared with the public, as this will help in understanding the river better and therefore help people better prepare for floods.

    As the research scholars point out, studying the river and the impact of climate change is a must to understand why the state gets flooded every year. As line in a famous Assamese song goes: “Luitar parore ami deka lora; moribole bhoi nai (We are the youths from the banks of the Luit [Brahmaputra]; we are not afraid of death),” people in the Valley seems to be living by the same spirit.

    Officials Discuss Management of Brahmaputra River (India)
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    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
  5. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Updated: Nov 28, 2017 22:54 IST http://www.hindustantimes.com/india...h-diversion/story-8NhSbUsG9oNKkz7npqGOpJ.html

    Guwahati, Hindustan Times
    [​IMG]
    Siang river rises in Tibet as Yarlung Tsangpo and reaches Assam to be known as Brahmaputra .(File)

    An Arunachal Pradesh MP has sounded the alarm after Siang – the river that rises in Tibet as Yarlung Tsangpo and reaches Assam to be known as Brahmaputra – turned “unnaturally muddy”, attributing it to China’s river diversion plan.

    But anti-dam activists in the state do not find any issue with the Chinese design on Tsangpo, including a plan to divert water to parched Xinjiang via a 1,000km tunnel. Reason: If no water flows down from Tsangpo, New Delhi will be forced to shelve the 10,000-megawatt hydropower project on Siang.

    Pasighat-based Ninong Ering, Lok Sabha member representing Arunachal East, had last week written to Prime Minister Narendra Modi sniffing a Chinese hand behind the waters of Siang turning excessively muddy.

    Pasighat, the headquarters of East Siang, is 560km north-east of Guwahati. The town is dominated by Adi tribe, who revere the river as Aane (mother).

    “Exploitation of the upper reaches of Siang (Tsangpo) has already begun. China has probably started constructing the 1,000km tunnel to divert the river to Xinjiang,” he said.

    Beijing has rejected there exists any plan as such.

    “I have grown up in Pasighat, and I know Siang (water) is so clear in November that you can see the riverbed. Now, the water is not only muddy, it seems there’s cement in it, which could be from the tunnel that China is probably constructing,” the Congress leader said.

    On Monday, tests by Arunachal Pradesh’s public health engineering department confirmed Ering’s fears. “Water samples tested in our laboratory using high-tech photometer revealed a turbidity count of 425 against the permissible range of 0-5,” the department’s executive engineer Bimal Welly said.

    Officials said more samples have been sent. They feared for the aquatic life if the river continues to be “this turbid”.

    The findings, however, have not perturbed the anti-dam groups such as Forum for Siang Dialogue (FSD), Siang People’s Forum and Adi Students’ Union.

    “Our people are happy there will be no more water to make a big dam and their agricultural lands will be saved from getting submerged. Water for drinking and irrigation comes from small rivers and rivulets and not from Siang,” FSD general secretary Vijay Taram told HT.
     
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  6. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    The BSF has also urged the ministry to sanction the raising of five more battalions (about 5,000 personnel) and their deployment along this border region.
    india Updated: Nov 29, 2017 20:15 IST
    Press Trust of India, New Delhi


    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india...er-says-bsf/story-Ytyq71m1uI1dlP2TPBoQ0O.html


    The Border Security Force (BSF) will deploy UAVs and put up a smart fence to check smuggling and infiltration from across the most notorious riverine and porous gaps along the India-Bangladesh border by next year, the chief of the force said on Wednesday.

    BSF Director General (DG) KK Sharma said the Union home ministry has recently approved a proposal of the force to deploy an indigenously developed smart fence at the 48.12-km-long riverine Dhubri border area along the Brahmaputra river in Assam.

    “The technology solution will help in checking surprise infiltration and it will also ensure rest and recuperation of troops involved in area domination duties in this area. By October 2018, this project will be in place at Dhubri,” he said.

    The smart fence, a senior officer said, will detect illegal human or cattle movement with the help of infra-red rays. The control room will get alerted by satellite-based signals in case of a breach followed by a response by a quick reaction armed team of the force, he said.

    At present, BSF troops on boats guard this patch which is highly prone to illegal migration and cattle smuggling due to the changing course of the river. No permanent structure like border posts can be erected in this area.

    Sharma said the force has approached the home ministry to procure four unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for “effective air surveillance of vulnerable infiltration areas of West Bengal, Assam, Meghalaya and Tripura”, along the 4,096-km India-Bangladesh border that they are mandated to guard.

    The BSF has also urged the ministry to sanction the raising of five more battalions (about 5,000 personnel) and their deployment along this border region to check crimes like smuggling of cattle, fake Indian currency notes, arms, ammunition and narcotics in some of the “most vulnerable and notorious areas, he said.

    The BSF chief said the force has “very cordial” relations with its counterpart -- the Border Guards Bangladesh (BGB) -- in checking border crimes and it was trying to bring down the instances of killing of Bangladeshis along the boundary.

    “The relations between the two countries are very good. The moment we change the present strategy (of using non-lethal weapons), more killings take place. It is detrimental to the interest of both the countries and we don’t want to embarrass the other side,” he said when asked if the force will use more lethal weapons as smugglers attack BSF men on duty.

    He said that to check border crimes and stop attacks on BSF personnel and subsequent killing of Bangladeshis due to firing, both the forces have started doing simultaneous coordinated patrols in vulnerable areas.

    “Hopefully, things will get better,” he said.

    Asked about the instances of cattle smuggling, the DG said these numbers were “gradually coming down”.

    The figure of cattle smuggling stood at over 20 lakh cattles a few years back but this was now only about five to six lakh, he said.

    “We are very serious about handling this issue and hence the number of clashes with smugglers (of BSF troops) has gone up in the last two years.

    “We have had two of our brave officers killed by the smugglers in the recent past while more than 120 people have been injured in various clashes,” he said.

    The force said it had also recently detected three underground tunnels in the border area.

    Tunneling is a serious concern in these areas and the tunnels are like those found along the Indo-Pak border areas, especially in Jammu region, for smuggling of contraband and arms, the DG said.

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