Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Pakistan invites Nitish Kumar, wish to replicate his funda of growth

Discussion in 'South Asia & SAARC' started by Blackwater, Aug 27, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Blackwater

    Blackwater Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2011
    Messages:
    1,033
    Likes Received:
    187
    Bihar chief minister Nitish Kumar will be visiting Pakistan sometime in November-December to talk about the development model and good governance he had ushered in his own state. Kumar gave an assurance to visit all the five provinces to an all-party delegation of parliamentarians from


    Pakistan, led by secretary general of Pakistan People's Party and leader of the house in senate Jehangir Badr. The delegation called on the chief minister at his official residence on Saturday. Chief secretary Navin Kumar, senior IAS officers Afzal Amanullah, AK Sinha, Amir Subhani, DGP Abhayanand were present on the occasion.
    Praising Kumar's efforts in transforming Bihar, which drew the delegation to Bihar, the members said that they percieved him as a leading player in Indian national politics and the sub-continent. The Pakistani delegation said that the invitation had been given to Nitish Kumar in consultation with the governments of all five provinces, which wanted to know about the models his government had adopted to bring about complete transformation of Bihar.

    "Bihar has had a rich cultural legacy. We have heard and read a lot about Bihar, which prompted us to come here and meet you. The growth story of Bihar is a talking point across the border also," said Badr.

    The chief minister apprised the delegates of how the state had embarked on the path of development, with improved law and order, spiralling enrollment of girls in schools, women empowerment through 50% reservation in local bodies, special emphasis on agriculture through agri roadmap, vastly improved road connectivity and right to service act to give time-bound servies to the common man.

    The delegation leaders, who are on a weeklong visit to India as part of confidence building exercise and promoting trade, said they were impressed by the kind of development and change Nitish Kumar had brought in Bihar in sectors like health, education, law and order, etc, and wanted to replicate the same in their provinces also.

    The governments of both the countries might be engaged in resolving the issues like terrorism and Kashmir, but people in general of both the countries want peace and good relationships to prevail. "It was because of the people's aspirations, governments of both the countries are determined to ease the visa norms, the draft of which is almost ready for signing," said Khurram Dastgir Khan, another member of national assembly of Pakistan.

    To a query, the delegation members said Pakistan was the worst victim of terrorism and the governments of both the country should strengthen their cooperation to fight it out. "If European countries can prosper on mutual trusts, why not India and Pakistan can help each other to fight poverty, terrorism to grow," they said.


    Pakistan invites Nitish Kumar, wish to replicate his funda of growth - Hindustan Times
     
  2. smestarz

    smestarz Lt. Colonel REGISTERED

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2011
    Messages:
    4,653
    Likes Received:
    1,803
    I think Pakistan , Nitish and people of India will all appreciate if he takes up the Position of PM of Pakistan.
    It is I believe win win win situation for him.
    PAkistan feels nitish can make good development
    Nitish will be among his loved people who he has been protecting as his votebank
    And Most of Indians might be happy that we can finally get rid of some ridiculous leader who instead of talking development and progress is talking of secular india

    Let him get a taste of Secular pakistan for a bit and then he can appreciate his sitaution in india
     
    2 people like this.
  3. Blackwater

    Blackwater Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2011
    Messages:
    1,033
    Likes Received:
    187
    Nitish can be great help to pak politicians
     
  4. Steel

    Steel Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    754
    Likes Received:
    226
    They should have asked Lalo for this
     
  5. smestarz

    smestarz Lt. Colonel REGISTERED

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2011
    Messages:
    4,653
    Likes Received:
    1,803
    Good, problem solved, lets sign the Agreement
    :)
    :wink:
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. tilopa

    tilopa Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    801
    Likes Received:
    216
    Nitish would clearly love this.....his muslim votebank will rocket up!
     
  7. smestarz

    smestarz Lt. Colonel REGISTERED

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2011
    Messages:
    4,653
    Likes Received:
    1,803
    Rab ne banayi jodi
     
  8. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    4,855
    Likes Received:
    1,740
    i'm not so sure the people of Bihar are too keen on losing him any time soon

    Why Nitish magic worked in Bihar - Hindustan Times
     
  9. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    4,855
    Likes Received:
    1,740
  10. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    4,855
    Likes Received:
    1,740
    The main articles of the Time Report:

    Breaking Free: How Nitish Kumar Turned Bihar Into a Model of Indian Reform


    Read more: Breaking Free: How Nitish Kumar Turned Bihar Into a Model of Indian Reform - TIME

    In Patna, the noisy capital of India's northern Bihar state, a crowd gathers early for the weekly janata darbar, the "people's audience." Many have traveled for hours, even days; some stop for a bit of fortification — sticky sweets and fried snacks from vendors on the lawns outside — before they enter the makeshift meeting hall. By 10:30 a.m. hundreds are standing under the whirring ceiling fans and corrugated metal sheeting. They form an impeccably ordered queue. Nearly all are men, most are poor, a few are barefoot, and each one has showed up for the same thing: to present their grievances directly to Bihar's chief minister, Nitish Kumar, the man at the end of the line.

    In a spotless white cotton tunic and pants, Kumar, 60, sits at a desk with a clear view of the only clock in the hall. The desk is bare except for a microphone and a pen, and Kumar glances briefly at each petition as it's placed before him. There are requests for jobs, complaints about corrupt village officials and pleas for a new bridge or ration shop. Kumar dispatches them to the row of ministers and bureaucrats lined up at tables on one side, as clerks briskly usher each supplicant to the relevant official. By 12:30 p.m., Kumar kicks off his sandals under the desk and relaxes — all 800 cases have been heard.
    (See more on Bihar.)

    Petitioner Ram Naresh Pandey, a 75-year-old farmer with forearms like tree branches, says that since 1990 his fields haven't had enough water because his neighbors upstream, of a different caste, diverted it from the main irrigation canal. He wants a side canal for his part of the village and makes his case to the minister for water resources, who promises to look into it. Pandey can check: his complaint has been scanned and numbered, and, with some help, he can go to the nearest town to track its progress online. Why did he make the 124-km journey to the janata darbar? "If not here, then where?" he says. "We now have hope."
    Hope once seemed unimaginable in Bihar. For decades the state was an Indian byword for poverty, violence and corruption. But that was before Kumar became chief minister in late 2005. In nearly 40 years in politics, Kumar has forged a reputation for quiet living and firm leadership ever since, as a bookish, idealistic engineering student, he joined a 1970s youth movement against corruption, unemployment and rising prices. Kumar's formula for good governance is based on straightforward, effective initiatives. He set up fast-track courts that convicted nearly 66,000 criminals — including three members of Parliament — and he bet big on roads, building some 33,000 km in five years. That combination of security and connectivity has spurred Bihar's economy to 11% average annual growth since 2006, second highest in India after Gujarat, the country's industrial powerhouse, and on par with states with much higher incomes, better infrastructure and more educated populations.
    (See pictures from 2008 as the Bihar area suffered the worst floods in over 50 years.)

    Kumar is now targeting official corruption — work that is drawing national attention. Indians are engaged in a fervent debate over whether corruption is an unavoidable lubricant in the country's rush to prosperity. Kumar, who is often mentioned as a possible future Prime Minister, believes that justice need not be sacrificed to achieve growth, and that Bihar can show the way for the rest of India. "We're not starry-eyed about the challenges ahead," says Sam Sharpe, India head of the British government's aid agency DFID. "But we do think what's happening [in Bihar] is quite a historic transformation."



    Read more: Breaking Free: How Nitish Kumar Turned Bihar Into a Model of Indian Reform - TIME
     
  11. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    4,855
    Likes Received:
    1,740

    How Bihar Went from Basket Case to Case Study


    Read more: How Nitish Kumar Turned Bihar from Basket Case to Case Study | World | TIME.com

    I visited Bihar for the first time in 1998, when its reputation for lawlessness was well-deserved. Traveling by train from Delhi, you knew exactly when you crossed the border into Bihar. That’s when groups of aggressive, ticket-less riders suddenly jumped onto the train, comfortable in the knowledge that, in Bihar, no one would challenge them. A while later, the train stopped for several hours, during which time an explanation eventually made its way to the passengers. There was a body on the tracks, and we would have to wait for someone to claim it.

    That makes Bihar’s turnaround all the more dramatic. After Nitish Kumar took office as chief minister in 2005, the state has enjoyed double-digit economic growth, and he is credited with reducing crime, improving school enrollment and improving Bihar’s woeful roads. The state is doing so well that it is even drawing migrant labor from neighboring Nepal; the flow of people used to go the other way. Kumar was recently re-elected with an even stronger mandate, and I wanted to see the so-called “Nitish Effect” for myself.

    In the capital, the main difference is the number of people, particularly women, walking around freely after dark. Patna is bustling, but unlike in the rest of India, cities are not the engines of growth in Bihar; villages are. There, the link between law-and-order, infrastructure and growth becomes very clear. Beekepers in the village of Patiyasa told me that they could now transport their boxes of bees around the state, without fearing that the bad roads would wreck their cargo or that local gangs would rob them along the way. Those two changes have immediately improved their profits, putting more money into their pockets, which some of them have spent on the shiny new motorbikes parked outside their houses. Small vegetable growers in Yusufpur and Khirodharpur say that the safer, smoother roads have made their whole families more productive. Women can now safely travel by themselves to bring vegetables to market or sell milk from their buffaloes to the local dairy cooperative, leaving the men more time to work in their fields.

    They were all praise for Kumar, but five years of success have also raised expectations. Biharis, like so many other Indians, are demanding that Kumar now do something to curb corruption. “Everywhere there is corruption,” says Rajendra Prasad Singh a farmer in Khirodharpur. “This should be removed.”

    Kumar has already made some bold moves against corruption. Top state officials, including himself, must now disclose their assets online. With his strong majority in the state legislature, Kumar is now pushing for a “right to services” act that guarantees citizens the delivery of documents like company registrations, driver’s licenses or death certificates within a fixed period – or the offending bureaucrat must pay a penalty out of his own salary. If Bihar can curb corruption, it might finally attract private investment, sustaining the growth that so far has come mainly from public spending. Even Nitish realizes that the “Nitish Effect” alone can only do so much.



    Read more: How Nitish Kumar Turned Bihar from Basket Case to Case Study | World | TIME.com
     
  12. Trendz

    Trendz 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    43
    muslim vote bank in india loves pakistan more than india for this ??
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. tilopa

    tilopa Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    801
    Likes Received:
    216
    YEah didn't you know?
    Have you not gone in a muslim majority area when there is a match between india vs pakistan?
     
    3 people like this.
  14. Trendz

    Trendz 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    43
    ohno be ready to hear 'what is wrong in it ' .. bla bla bla
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. Devil

    Devil Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    Messages:
    1,430
    Likes Received:
    256
    yes lets hang them all they supported shahid afridi :rofl: c'mon now post an smart arguement
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page