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Pakistan secretly backed Taliban: Wikileaks

Discussion in 'South Asia & SAARC' started by Osiris, Jul 26, 2010.

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  1. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    WASHINGTON, July 25 (Reuters) - U.S. officials in Afghanistan strongly suspected Pakistan was secretly supporting the Taliban while taking massive amounts of American aid, military reports leaked on Sunday show, raising new questions about President Barack Obama's war strategy.

    The White House responded immediately with a strong condemnation of the disclosures by the organization WikiLeaks, saying it could threaten national security and endanger the lives of Americans and those of its allies.

    But Obama's national security adviser, Jim Jones, said the leak would not affect "our ongoing commitment to deepen our partnerships with Afghanistan and Pakistan."

    The revelations contained in more than 90,000 classified documents could fuel growing doubts in Congress about Obama's war strategy when the U.S. death toll is soaring and public support for the 9-year-old war is eroding.

    Despite efforts by the White House to contain the political fallout, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John Kerry, one of Obama's closest Democratic allies, said the leaked documents raised "serious questions about the reality of America's policy toward Pakistan and Afghanistan."

    "Those policies are at a critical stage and these documents may very well underscore the stakes and make the calibrations needed to get the policy right more urgent," Kerry said.

    The documents about Pakistan's alleged double-dealing could provide fodder for lawmakers who want to hold Obama to a timeline for withdrawing troops starting next July as well as increase pressure on the administration to outline a clear exit strategy.

    Under the heading "Afghan War Diary, the 91,000 documents collected from across the U.S. military in Afghanistan, cover the war from 2004 to 2010, WikiLeaks said in a summary.

    One of them discusses a meeting of insurgents attended by a former senior Pakistani intelligence official who appears to be working against U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

    The documents were made available first to The New York Times, Britain's The Guardian newspaper and German weekly Der Spiegel.

    The Times reported the documents showed Pakistan actively collaborating with the Afghan insurgency.

    "The documents ... suggest that Pakistan, an ostensible ally of the United States, allows representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the Taliban in secret strategy sessions to organize networks of militant groups that fight against American soldiers in Afghanistan, and even hatch plots to assassinate Afghan leaders," the Times said.

    The Guardian pointed to an April 2007 allegation that Pakistani intelligence sent 1,000 motorbikes to the Haqqani network, which is aligned with the Taliban, for suicide attacks in Khost and Logar provinces.

    SERIOUS CHALLENGES AHEAD

    A summary of the documents is available at Wikileaks - WikiLeaks, along with a link to the webpage where WikiLeaks said the documents would be posted later on Sunday.

    U.S. officials said the documents focused on the period leading to the launch of Obama's Afghan strategy in December 2009, when he authorized the deployment of 30,000 additional troops.

    "President Obama announced a new strategy with a substantial increase in resources for Afghanistan, and increased focus on al Qaeda and Taliban safe havens in Pakistan, precisely because of the grave situation that had developed over several years," Jones said.

    "We know that serious challenges lie ahead, but if Afghanistan is permitted to slide backwards, we will again face a threat from violent extremist groups like al Qaeda who will have more space to plot and train," he said.

    Pakistan's ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, said leaking unprocessed reports from the battlefield was irresponsible.

    "These reports reflect nothing more than single source comments and rumors, which abound on both sides of the Pakistan-Afghanistan border and are often proved wrong," he said in a statement.

    U.S. officials have long complained some in Pakistan were playing both sides.

    The London School of Economics recently published a report that alleged enduring ties between Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency, known as ISI, and the Afghan Taliban.

    The report said the agency not only funds and trains Taliban fighters in Afghanistan but is officially represented on the movement's leadership council, giving it significant influence over operations.

    Asked about the report last month, General David Petraeus, who recently took over command of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, said Pakistan has maintained "a variety of relationships," in some cases dating back decades, to groups which, with U.S. support, battled the Soviets when they occupied Afghanistan.

    "Some of those ties continue in various forms, some of them, by the way, gathering intelligence," Petraeus told U.S. lawmakers. "You have to have contact with bad guys to get intelligence on bad guys."

    WikiLeaks promotes the leaking of information to fight government and corporate corruption. Earlier this year, it leaked a classified video showing a 2007 helicopter attack that killed a dozen people in Iraq, including two Reuters journalists. (Reporting by Adam Entous and Alister Bull; Editing by Patricia Wilson and Doina Chiacu)

    Reuters AlertNet - Pakistan secretly backed Taliban: Wikileaks
     
  2. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    WikiLeaks Drops 90,000 War Docs; Fingers Pakistan as Insurgent Ally

    Turns out “Collateral Murder” was just a warmup. WikiLeaks just published a trove of over 90,000 mostly-classified U.S. military documents that details a strengthening Afghan insurgency with deep ties to Pakistani intelligence.

    WikiLeaks’ release of a 2007 Apache gunship video sparked worldwide outrage, but little change in U.S. policy. This massive storehouse taken, it would appear, from U.S. Central Command’s CIDNE data warehouse — has the potential to be strategically significant, raising questions about how and why America and her allies are conducting the war.

    Not only does it recount 144 incidents in which coalition forces killed civilians over six years. But it shows just how deeply elements within the United States’ supposed ally, Pakistan, have nurtured the Afghan insurgency. In its granular, behind-the-scene details about the war, this has the potential to be Afghanistan’s answer to the Pentagon Papers. Except in 2010, it comes as a database you can open in Excel, brought to you by the now-reopened-for-business WikiLeaks.

    Now, obviously, it’s not news that the Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligences has ties to the Afghan Taliban, the Haqqani network and Gulbuddin Hekmatyar’s Hezb-e-Islami. That’s something that pretty much every observer of the Afghanistan war and the Pakistani intelligence apparatus has known for the better part of a decade.

    But as the early-viewing New York Times reports, WikiLeaks presents a new depth of detail about how the U.S. military has seen, for six years, the depths of ISI facilitation of the Afghan insurgency. For instance: a three-star Pakistani general active during the ’80s-era U.S.-Pakistani-Saudi sponsorship of the anti-Soviet insurgency, Hamid Gul, allegedly met with insurgent leaders in South Waziristan in January 2009 to plot vengeance for the drone-inflicted death of an al-Qaeda operative. (Gul called it “absolute nonsense” to the Times reporters.)

    Other reports, stretching back to 2004, offer chilling, granular detail about the Taliban’s return to potency after the U.S. and Afghan militias routed the religious-based movement in 2001. Some of them, as the Times notes, cast serious doubt on official U.S. and NATO accounts of how insurgents prosecute the war. Apparently, the insurgents have used “heat-seeking missiles against allied aircraft,” eerily reminiscent of the famous Stinger missiles that the U.S., Saudi Arabia and Pakistan provided to the mujahedeen to down Soviet helicopters. One such missile downed a Chinook over Helmand in May 2007.

    Typically, NATO accounts of copter downings are vague — and I’ve never seen one that cited the Taliban’s use of a guided missile. This clearly isn’t just Koran, Kalashnikov and laptop anymore. And someone is selling the insurgents these missiles, after all. That someone just might be slated to receive $7.5 billion of U.S. aid over the next five years.

    That said, it’s worth pointing out that the documents released so far are U.S. military documents, not ISI documents, so they don’t quite rise to smoking-gun level.

    Not that that’s so necessary. The ISI’s quasi-sponsorship of the Afghan insurgency is pretty much an open secret. Most Washington analysts take it for granted that at least some aspects of the Pakistani security apparatus retain ties to the Taliban and affiliated extremist groups as an insurance policy for controlling events inside Afghanistan. That’s why some thought it was a positive sign in February when the Pakistanis captured Mullah Baradar, a senior Afghan Taliban leader — including (cough) too-credulous journalists.

    WikiLeaks has freaked out the White House, though, by clearly raising questions about whether Pakistani aid to the Afghan insurgency is far deeper than typically acknowledged — something that would raise additional questions about whether the Obama administration’s strategy of hugging Pakistan into severing those ties is viable. Retired Marine General Jim Jones, President Obama’s national security adviser, e-mailed reporters a long statement denouncing the leaks and pledging continued support for Pakistan.

    “The United States strongly condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organizations which could put the lives of Americans and our partners at risk, and threaten our national security,” Jones said in a statement. “Wikileaks made no effort to contact us about these documents — the United States government learned from news organizations that these documents would be posted. These irresponsible leaks will not impact our ongoing commitment to deepen our partnerships with Afghanistan and Pakistan; to defeat our common enemies; and to support the aspirations of the Afghan and Pakistani people.” So much for a shift in course.

    Is there a silver lining to Pakistan’s relationship with the insurgents? On the one hand, it’s possible that the extent of those ties might amount to leverage over the insurgents to cut a deal with Hamid Karzai’s government to end the war. But there was a lot of talk about that when Baradar was captured, and none of it has panned out. And in the meantime, the first batch of expanded U.S. aid to Pakistan — $500 million worth — arrived on July 18. Who knows how much of that money will end up in the Afghan insurgents’ pockets.

    We’ll have additional reports on this as we go through the trove, as will our sister blog, Threat Level. There’s stuff in here about the use of drones, the deadly Kunduz airstrike last year and much, much more. In the meantime, tell us what you find in the WikiLeaks trove, either by leaving a note in the comments, or by dropping us a line. Either way, include the document number so we can keep track of it all.

    WikiLeaks Drops 90,000 War Docs; Fingers Pakistan as Insurgent Ally | Danger Room | Wired.com
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2010
  3. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  4. prototype

    prototype Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    now what we can say an another dumb conspiracy theory,Iran helping taliban,come'on man when this people will take a break
     
  5. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    its not a conspiracy theory buddy...these are classified official records of war on terror in Afghanistan
     
  6. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Polish intelligence had warned of attack on Indian embassy in Kabul

    NEW YORK: Polish intelligence had, a week before the 2008 Indian embassy bombing, warned of a possible Taliban attack on Indian interests in the Afghan capital with the "main goal" to show its ability to attack on every object in Kabul, according to a document leaked by whistleblower site WikiLeaks.

    The document on possible attack on the Indian embassy is part of a massive leak of 92,000 intelligence reports that suggested that the war in Afghanistan is going badly for the US and Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) is fuelling the insurgency in the war-torn country.

    Advance copies of the leak were made available to three publications - The New York Times, British daily newspaper Guardian, and German weekly Der Spiegel, which made some excerpts available.

    The document dealing with the Indian embassy is titled 'Threat Report: Threat to Indian Embassy.'

    The date of information is June 30, 2008, while the date of report is July 1, 2008. The organisation involved is "Taliban Center" and the Report number is 75010708.

    "Taliban are planning to carry out an attack on the Indian embassy in Kabul. TB (Taliban) designated an engineer to take this action," the document reads.

    "He intends to use stolen ANA/ANP (Afghan National Army/ Afghan National Police) car, and wears stolen uniform. He speaks Dari with distinct Iranian accent. Allegedly, he is the owner of a company," it added.

    A suicide bomber rammed an explosives-laden car into the heavily fortified Indian embassy's gates in Kabul on July 7, 2008, killing 58 people and wounding more than 140.

    Defence attache Brigadier R D Mehta and Counsellor Venkateswara Rao were killed when the suicide bomber targeted the embassy during the morning rush hour.

    "INS (insurgents) are planning to divide into two groups: first will attack Indian embassy building, whilst the second group will engage security posts in front of MOI (ministry of interior), IOT (in order to) give possibility to escape attackers from the first group," the report said.

    "Budget for this action is about $1,20,000. The main goal of this operation is to show TB's (Taliban) abilities to carry out attack on every object in Kabul."

    Other documents strongly indicate that Pakistan's ISI is supporting the insurgency in Afghanistan, as well as plotting with Taliban leaders to assassinate Afghan leaders.

    The New York Times pointed out that it has been difficult for the US to pin Pakistan's spy agency directly to an attack orchestrated by the Taliban.

    But the assault on the Indian embassy led the CIA's then deputy director Stephen R Kappes to immediately go to Islamabad to confront the ISI with evidence that it had helped organise the attack.

    Another leaked document, dated August 2008, identifies a colonel in the ISI plotting with a Taliban official to assassinate Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

    However, there were no accompanying details and the report could not be verified.

    Meanwhile, US national security advisor James Jones, in a statement, condemned the leaks as "irresponsible" and said that WikiLeaks had not contacted the US government before going public.

    "The United States strongly condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organisations which could put the lives of Americans and our partners at risk, and threaten our national security," Jones said.

    "WikiLeaks made no effort to contact us about these documents - the United States government learned from news organisations that these documents would be posted," he added.

    Polish intelligence had warned of attack on Indian embassy in Kabul - India - The Times of India
     
  7. booo

    booo Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    few days ago people started talking about wikileaks going down as they didnt have money etc... there were even reports that wikileaks' secure upload page is down. wikileaks have come back really great. hope us's policy towards pak changes after this incident.
     
  8. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    ISI runs, controls network of suicide bombers in Afghanistan

    Pakistan's military spy agency, the ISI, has been accused of running the networks of suicide bombers that emerged as a sudden, terrible force in Afghanistan in 2006.

    The documents, made available on Sunday by an organization called WikiLeaks, found the suspicions harboured by Americans fighting the war in Afghanistan that the ISI has guided the Afghan insurgency with a hidden hand, to be true.

    The detailed reports indicate that US officials had a relatively clear understanding of how the suicide networks functioned, even if some of the threats did not materialize.

    One report, from Dec. 18, 2006, describes a cyclical process to develop the suicide bombers, The New York Times reports.

    First, the suicide attacker is recruited and trained in Pakistan. Then, reconnaissance and operational planning gets under way, including scouting to find a place for "hosting" the suicide bomber near the target before carrying out the attack.

    Several of the reports describe current and former ISI operatives, including Lt. Gen. Hamid Gul, who headed the ISI from 1987 to 1989, visiting madrasas near the city of Peshawar to get recruits for suicide bombings.

    One report describes an ISI plan to use a remote-controlled bomb disguised as a golden Koran to assassinate Afghan officials. Another report documents an alleged plot by the ISI and Taliban to ship poisoned alcoholic beverages to Afghanistan to kill US troops.

    But the reports also charge that the ISI directly helped organize Taliban offensives at key junctures of the war. On June 19, 2006, ISI operatives allegedly met with Taliban leaders in Quetta, the city in southern Pakistan. At the meeting they pressed the Taliban to mount attacks on Maruf, a district of Kandahar that lies along the Pakistani border.

    While the specifics about the foreign fighters and the ISI are difficult to verify, the Taliban did indeed mount an offensive to seize control in Maruf in 2006.

    Afghan government officials and Taliban fighters have widely acknowledged that the offensive was led by the Taliban commander Mullah Akhtar Muhammad Mansour, who was then the Taliban shadow governor of Kandahar.(ANI)

    ISI runs, controls network of suicide bombers in Afghanistan
     
  9. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Pak in denial mode following ISI- Afghan Taliban nexus

    Pakistan's Ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, has called the leak of classified US military documents on the Afghan war as "irresponsible", and insisted that his nation was fully committed to fighting terror groups.

    Whistle-blower organization WikiLeaks has released over 90,000 documents called the 'Afghan War Diaries, 2004-2010', which prove fears that Pakistan is aiding the Taliban to organize networks of militant groups that fight against American soldiers in Afghanistan.

    "The documents circulated by Wikileaks do not reflect the current on ground realities," The Telegraph quoted Haqqani, as saying in a statement.

    "These reports reflect nothing more than single-source comments and rumours, which abound on both sides of the Pakistan-Afghanistan border and are often proved wrong after deeper examination," he added.

    He further claimed that over the years Pakistan has deepened its bilateral partnership with the U.S., and joint counter-terrorism operations have led to significant blows against 'violent extremist groups'.

    "The United States, Afghanistan and Pakistan are strategic partners and are jointly endeavouring to defeat Al-Qaeda and its Taliban allies militarily and politically," he added.

    Haqqani also highlighted that the Pakistan government "is following a clearly laid-out strategy of fighting and marginalising terrorists, and our military and intelligence services are effectively executing that policy". (ANI)

    Pak in denial mode following ISI- Afghan Taliban nexus proof in leaked US military data
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    The US knows the game. Just that acting now won't be in their interest.
     
  11. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    WikiLeaks says no doubt on documents' reliability

    LONDON – WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says there's "no reason" to doubt the reliability of 91,000 pages of leaked U.S. documents relating to the war in Afghanistan.

    Speaking Monday in London after the release of the classified U.S. military records, Assange said the veracity of the material isn't in doubt. But he says "just like dealing with any source you should exercise some common sense. That doesn't mean you should close your eyes."

    On Sunday, the online whistle-blower WikiLeaks posted some 90,000 leaked U.S. military records of six years of the war, including unreported incidents of Afghan civilian killings and covert operations against Taliban figures.

    THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Shocking in scope if not in content, the leak of 91,000 classified U.S. records on the Afghanistan war by the whistle-blower website Wikileaks.org is one of the largest unauthorized disclosures in military history.

    The documents cover much of what the public already knows about the troubled nine-year conflict: U.S. spec-ops forces have targeted militants without trial, Afghans have been killed by accident, and U.S. officials have been infuriated by alleged Pakistani intelligence cooperation with the very insurgent groups bent on killing Americans.

    WikiLeaks posted the documents Sunday. The New York Times, London's Guardian newspaper and the German weekly Der Spiegel were given early access to the records.

    The release was instantly condemned by U.S. and Pakistani officials as both potentially harmful and irrelevant.

    White House national security adviser Gen. Jim Jones said the release "put the lives of Americans and our partners at risk." In a statement, he then took pains to point out that the documents describe a period from January 2004 to December 2009, mostly during the administration of President George W. Bush. And, Jones added, before President Obama announced a new strategy.

    Pakistan's Ambassador Husain Haqqani agreed, saying the documents "do not reflect the current on-ground realities," in which his country and Washington are "jointly endeavoring to defeat al-Qaida and its Taliban allies."

    The U.S. and Pakistan assigned teams of analysts to read the records online to assess whether sources or locations were at risk.

    The New York Times said the documents reveal that only a short time ago, there was far less harmony in U.S. and Pakistani exchanges.

    The Times says the "raw intelligence assessments" by lower level military officers suggest that Pakistan "allows representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the Taliban in secret strategy sessions to organize networks of militant groups that fight against American soldiers in Afghanistan, and even hatch plots to assassinate Afghan leaders."

    The Guardian, however, interpreted the documents differently, saying they "fail to provide a convincing smoking gun" for complicity between the Pakistan intelligence services and the Taliban.

    The leaked records include detailed descriptions of raids carried out by a secretive U.S. special operations unit called Task Force 373 against what U.S. officials considered high-value insurgent and terrorist targets. Some of the raids resulted in unintended killings of Afghan civilians, according to the documentation.

    During the targeting and killing of Libyan fighter Abu Laith al-Libi, described in the documents as a senior al-Qaida military commander, the death tally was reported as six enemy fighters and seven noncombatants — all children.

    Task Force 373 selected its targets from 2,000 senior Taliban and al-Qaida figures posted on a "kill or capture" list, known as JPEL, the Joint Prioritized Effects List, the Guardian said.

    WikiLeaks said the release Sunday "did not generally include top-secret organizations," and that it had "delayed the release of some 15,000 reports" as part of what it called "a harm minimization process demanded by our source," but said it would release the documents later, possibly with material redacted.

    U.S. government agencies have been bracing for a deluge of thousands more classified documents since the leak of helicopter cockpit video of a 2007 firefight in Baghdad. That was blamed on a U.S. Army intelligence analyst, Spc. Bradley Manning, 22, of Potomac, Md. He was charged with releasing classified information earlier this month. Manning had bragged on line that he downloaded 260,000 classified U.S. cables and transmitted them to Wikileaks.org.

    WikiLeaks says no doubt on documents' reliability - Yahoo! News
     
  12. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    In one report from March 2008, the ISI is alleged to have ordered Siraj Haqqani, a prominent militant based in northwestern Pakistan, to kill workers from archenemy India who are building roads in Afghanistan. In another from March 2007, the ISI is alleged to have given Jalaluddin Haqqani, Siraj's father, 1,000 motorcycles to carry out suicide attacks in Afghanistan.

    Gul, who has been an outspoken supporter of the Taliban, is alleged to have dispatched three men in December 2006 to carry out attacks in Afghanistan's capital.

    "Reportedly Gul's final comment to the three individuals was to make the snow warm in Kabul, basically telling them to set Kabul aflame," said the report.

    One dispatch from February 2007 claims militants teamed up with the ISI to kill Afghan and NATO forces with poisoned alcohol bought in Pakistan.

    It said more than 180 intelligence files accuse the ISI of supplying, arming and training the insurgency since at least 2004. One of the reports even implicates the ISI in a plot to assassinate Afghan President Hamid Karzai
     
  13. prototype

    prototype Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    that means U.S acknowledge it's mistakes,but r still not ready to correct them,no surprise they r on the loosing side here and their citizen's life is at risk
     
  14. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    This is the time for citizens of USofA to respond...their tax payed money (us aid to pakistan which is around 1.5 billion $ year)is used to kill US soldiers.
     
  15. Desi Jatt

    Desi Jatt Captain ELITE MEMBER

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    Pakistan Aids Insurgency in Afghanistan, Reports Assert

    Pakistan guides and helps the Taliban.

    Americans fighting the war in Afghanistan have long harbored strong suspicions that Pakistan’s military spy service has guided the Afghan insurgency with a hidden hand, even as Pakistan receives more than $1 billion a year from Washington for its help combating the militants, according to a trove of secret military field reports made public Sunday.

    The documents, made available by an organization called WikiLeaks, suggest that Pakistan, an ostensible ally of the United States, allows representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the Taliban in secret strategy sessions to organize networks of militant groups that fight against American soldiers in Afghanistan, and even hatch plots to assassinate Afghan leaders.

    Taken together, the reports indicate that American soldiers on the ground are inundated with accounts of a network of Pakistani assets and collaborators that runs from the Pakistani tribal belt along the Afghan border, through southern Afghanistan, and all the way to the capital, Kabul.

    Much of the information — raw intelligence and threat assessments gathered from the field in Afghanistan— cannot be verified and likely comes from sources aligned with Afghan intelligence, which considers Pakistan an enemy, and paid informants. Some describe plots for attacks that do not appear to have taken place.

    But many of the reports rely on sources that the military rated as reliable.

    While current and former American officials interviewed could not corroborate individual reports, they said that the portrait of the spy agency’s collaboration with the Afghan insurgency was broadly consistent with other classified intelligence.

    Some of the reports describe Pakistani intelligence working alongside Al Qaeda to plan attacks. Experts cautioned that although Pakistan’s militant groups and Al Qaeda work together, directly linking the Pakistani spy agency, the Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, with Al Qaeda is difficult.

    The records also contain firsthand accounts of American anger at Pakistan’s unwillingness to confront insurgents who launched attacks near Pakistani border posts, moved openly by the truckload across the frontier, and retreated to Pakistani territory for safety.

    The behind-the-scenes frustrations of soldiers on the ground and glimpses of what appear to be Pakistani skullduggery contrast sharply with the frequently rosy public pronouncements of Pakistan as an ally by American officials, looking to sustain a drone campaign over parts of Pakistani territory to strike at Qaeda havens. Administration officials also want to keep nuclear-armed Pakistan on their side to safeguard NATO supplies flowing on routes that cross Pakistan to Afghanistan.

    This month, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, in one of the frequent visits by American officials to Islamabad, announced $500 million in assistance and called the United States and Pakistan “partners joined in common cause.”

    The reports suggest, however, that the Pakistani military has acted as both ally and enemy, as its spy agency runs what American officials have long suspected is a double game — appeasing certain American demands for cooperation while angling to exert influence in Afghanistan through many of the same insurgent networks that the Americans are fighting to eliminate.

    Behind the scenes, both Bush and Obama administration officials as well as top American commanders have confronted top Pakistani military officers with accusations of ISI complicity in attacks in Afghanistan, and even presented top Pakistani officials with lists of ISI and military operatives believed to be working with militants.

    Benjamin Rhodes, deputy national security adviser for strategic communications, said that Pakistan had been an important ally in the battle against militant groups, and that Pakistani soldiers and intelligence officials had worked alongside the United States to capture or kill Qaeda and Taliban leaders.

    Still, he said that the “status quo is not acceptable,” and that the havens for militants in Pakistan “pose an intolerable threat” that Pakistan must do more to address.

    “The Pakistani government — and Pakistan’s military and intelligence services — must continue their strategic shift against violent extremist groups within their borders,” he said. American military support to Pakistan would continue, he said.

    Several Congressional officials said that despite repeated requests over the years for information about Pakistani support for militant groups, they usually receive vague and inconclusive briefings from the Pentagon and C.I.A.

    Nonetheless, senior lawmakers say they have no doubt that Pakistan is aiding insurgent groups. “The burden of proof is on the government of Pakistan and the ISI to show they don’t have ongoing contacts,” said Senator Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat on the Armed Services Committee who visited Pakistan this month and said he and Senator Carl Levin of Michigan, the committee chairman, confronted Pakistan’s prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, yet again over the allegations.

    Such accusations are usually met with angry denials, particularly by the Pakistani military, which insists that the ISI severed its remaining ties to the groups years ago. An ISI spokesman in Islamabad said Sunday that the agency would have no comment until it saw the documents. Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, said, “The documents circulated by WikiLeaks do not reflect the current on-ground realities.”

    The man the United States has depended on for cooperation in fighting the militants and who holds most power in Pakistan, the head of the army, Gen. Parvez Ashfaq Kayani, ran the ISI from 2004 to 2007, a period from which many of the reports are drawn. American officials have frequently praised General Kayani for what they say are his efforts to purge the military of officers with ties to militants.

    American officials have described Pakistan’s spy service as a rigidly hierarchical organization that has little tolerance for “rogue” activity. But Pakistani military officials give the spy service’s “S Wing” — which runs external operations against the Afghan government and India — broad autonomy, a buffer that allows top military officials deniability.

    American officials have rarely uncovered definitive evidence of direct ISI involvement in a major attack. But in July 2008, the C.I.A.’s deputy director, Stephen R. Kappes, confronted Pakistani officials with evidence that the ISI helped plan the deadly suicide bombing of India’s Embassy in Kabul.

    From the current trove, one report shows that Polish intelligence warned of a complex attack against the Indian Embassy a week before that bombing, though the attackers and their methods differed. The ISI was not named in the report warning of the attack.

    Another, dated August 2008, identifies a colonel in the ISI plotting with a Taliban official to assassinate President Hamid Karzai. The report says there was no information about how or when this would be carried out. The account could not be verified.

    read more on :http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/26/world/asia/26isi.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2010
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