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Pakistan Timeline: News, Discussions & Opinions

Discussion in 'South Asia & SAARC' started by tariqkhan18, Apr 14, 2010.

  1. gowthamraj

    gowthamraj Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    self-delete . . .duplicate post
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2010
  2. gowthamraj

    gowthamraj Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    in fight against terror civilian loss unavoidable but terrors uses this to gain locals sympathy
     
  3. AVADI

    AVADI Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    This is one of the main reason IAF is not involved in the maoist operations.
     
  4. Dark_Prince

    Dark_Prince 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    RIP who perished!
     
  5. Ares

    Ares FULL MEMBER

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    Guyz this video is kind of old, possible you have seen it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  6. Ares

    Ares FULL MEMBER

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  7. thinkingcap81

    thinkingcap81 FULL MEMBER

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    Hi,

    I am creating this tread in order to bring into perspective the viewpoints of folks across the border. It is all to often that many threads degenerate into a meaningless duel. Sharing our perspectives of each other will go a long way towards understanding our complex and strained relationship.

    Members from Pakistan should also contribute their views. Geo-political issues would be welcome too.

    I am aware that this could be a slow moving thread, because this thread caters to a niche segment. But kindly avoid Zaid Hamid types and his Indian counterparts !!

    Thanks and looking forward to your participation !!
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2010
  8. thinkingcap81

    thinkingcap81 FULL MEMBER

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    A reporter's view of our neighbour

    Khuda Hafiz Pakistan

    By Nirupama Subramanian

    People on both sides must take charge of peace-making.

    The goodwill experienced in daily interactions with ordinary Pakistanis was overwhelming and more powerful than anything else

    The political class on both sides has specialised in hyping the emotional in India-Pakistan relations over the rational


    “There is a Pakistani in every Indian; and an Indian in every Pakistani,†President Asif Ali Zardari famously said two years ago. Those words rang in my head with new resonance as I packed my bags and left Pakistan recently after a nearly four-year-long assignment as this newspaper's Islamabad-based correspondent.

    It should have been easy to leave a country that is by word and deed hostile to India, and where the state machinery treats every Indian as a “RAW agentâ€, spending considerable human and material resources on the surveillance of the only two Indian journalists — from The Hindu and Press Trust India — that are permitted to be based there.

    Yet, saying goodbye to Pakistan was much more difficult than I imagined. Like other Indians who have experienced Pakistan first-hand, I gained a vast number of friends for life and multitudes of warm memories. Against this reality, it seems absurdly unbelievable that these two countries are not even talking properly to each other, that I cannot visit my Pakistani friends easily, that they cannot come and see me. Even texting, one of the easiest and cost-efficient ways of keeping in touch these days, is not possible — or erratic, at best — between India and Pakistan.

    Huge distance

    Walking across the Wagah border into India took me less than five minutes. But as I turned at the gates to wave to a Pakistani friend who had come to see me off, the distance between the two countries seemed huge and daunting.

    At home, family and friends greeted me with relief, and asked me how I had managed to survive four years in “a country of terrorists.†Despite the close geographical proximity of the two countries, and the reams written and spoken in India about Pakistan, there seemed little patience for or understanding of the complexities of, an important neighbouring country, the shades of political, social and religious opinion among Pakistanis on such issues as terrorism and extremism.

    There is similarly much in the way Pakistanis react to India that can send even the mildest Indian's blood pressure rising. For instance, even well-educated Pakistanis continue to believe that the Mumbai attacks were staged by RAW to defame Pakistan with the ultimate aim of snatching its nuclear weapons or dismembering the country. Young and old alike will assert that India is behind the wave of terrorist attacks in Pakistan because “no Muslim will kill fellow Muslimsâ€, even though they have no explanation for why Shias routinely get killed by Sunni extremists.

    I would have heated debates with Pakistanis who consider themselves modern, enlightened, liberal and secular but would suddenly go all Islamic and religious when it came to an issue such as Kashmir, seeming no different from their ultra-conservative compatriots who protest against the clamping down on Islamic militancy in Pakistan as harassment of “brother Muslims.†They could tout jihad in Kashmir as legitimate even while condemning the Taliban who threaten their own modern, liberal lifestyle, despite the knowledge that the distinction between the two kinds of jihad, or the two categories of militants, is at best an illusion.

    But at the end of the day, the goodwill I experienced in my daily interactions with ordinary Pakistanis, even during the most heated debates, was overwhelming and more powerful than anything else. Despite the heavy hand of the state in every sphere of life, I found people who were willing to set aside long internalised stereotypes and prejudices about Indians and Hindus to try and understand me and my point of view, and they accepted with good faith that I was trying to do the same. We may not have entirely convinced each other every time but we managed to build little bridges of our own and find our own modus vivendi.

    If there is anything I learnt from those personal experiences in Pakistan, it is that these little bridges are the key to peace. And for this reason, peace-making cannot be left to rulers. It is the people on both sides that have to take charge of it. What the people have now is a unique and contradictory chemistry of love and hate, curiosity and suspicion, friendliness and antagonism, admiration and envy, not to speak of nostalgia and convenient memory lapses. Forget about which of these is natural and which deliberately created. What is required for a stable relationship is a rational middle-ground between these emotional extremes.

    If we acknowledge that war or even just a simmering long-term enmity is not an option, that middle-ground would be easy to locate. There, on that middle-ground, we need not be the best of friends, but we need not be the worst of enemies either. We can just live as two civilised neighbours.

    It is evident that the political leadership of both countries, which includes the military in Pakistan, cannot be entrusted with finding this middle-ground. The political class on both sides has specialised in hyping the emotional in India-Pakistan relations over the rational, finding it a useful instrument for domestic political gain. Blame communally driven politics on the Indian side, and in Pakistan, the tight grip of a military that needs to perpetuate its predominance in national affairs.

    Narrow prism of state

    Most of the celebrated India-Pakistan people-to-people contact since 2004, including the interaction between the media, film and fashion worlds of the two countries, has tended to be driven by the governments on both sides, or blessed, encouraged or sponsored by the two states in some way. With rare exceptions, such contact has mirrored the official point of view, providing no room for building genuine bridges. No wonder they fell apart so easily in the aftermath of the 2008 Mumbai attacks to a point where goodwill seems almost irretrievable.

    But even now, the first thing that Pakistanis and Indians ask each other is: “We eat the same food, speak the same language, we even look the same, so why can't we be friends?†The short answer to that is that we cannot be friends as long as we continue looking at each other through the narrow prism of our respective states. Pakistanis must locate the Indian within themselves, and Indians must discover their inner Pakistani. It would help understand each other better, and free us from state-manipulated attitudes. In our own interests, it is up to us, the people, to find ways to do this. For now, Khuda Hafiz Pakistan.

    http://www.hindu.com/2010/03/20/stories/2010032056641300.htm
     
  9. capricorn

    capricorn FULL MEMBER

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    This is exactly the reason why the IAF Chief resisted use of the AF inside the borders.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2010
  10. SpArK

    SpArK SorCeroR Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    At last admitted for good. Infact IAF has proposed drone surveillance.
     
  11. Indian_Idol

    Indian_Idol 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Pakistan war games show of force for India: analysts


    [​IMG]
    KHAIRPUR TAMEWALI, Pakistan — Pakistan is flexing its military might near the Indian border in massive war games analysts say are aimed at putting on a show of force for its nuclear-armed rival.

    All branches of the military are taking part in the exercises named "New Resolve", which despite the Taliban militant threat in the northwest have so far focused on drills for conventional war on the eastern border with India.

    Fighter jets roared overhead, shots rang out and tanks lumbered through the desert sands in the biggest war games in two decades in the Khairpur Tamewali area of Punjab province, 600 kilometres (about 400 miles) south of Islamabad.

    The Pakistan Air Force's F-16s, French Mirages and Chinese-made F-7PGs engaged imaginary targets on the ground with a hail of bombs and missiles.

    Up to 50,000 troops will take part in the games, which began on April 10 and will end on May 13 just 60 kilometres from the Indian border.
    "The exercise seems to have nothing to do with the western borders," retired Lieutenant General Kamal Matinuddin, a defence analyst, told AFP.

    "The way the military demonstrated its prowess by quickly mobilising troops and the war machinery showed the war games are actually focusing on the eastern borders," he added.

    "Our armed forces must be capable of responding to emerging challenges on the eastern border by devising new tactics in response to new Indian strategy."

    India and Pakistan have fought three wars since independence in 1947 -- two of them over the fate of the Himalayan territory of Kashmir -- and there have been repeated shows of military force on both sides of the border.

    Recent tensions with India and reported new military strategy coming from New Delhi "have triggered a hot response from Pakistan," defence and security analyst Brigadier Mahmood Shah told AFP after witnessing the exercises.

    "Our military keeps on putting to test its doctrines on the western border with Afghanistan but we really needed to test our capabilities focusing on conventional war on the eastern border," the retired brigadier said.

    A campaign of suicide attacks and bombings in Pakistan blamed on the Taliban and other extremist Islamist groups has killed more than 3,200 people in less than three years across the nuclear-armed country of 167 million people.

    Pakistan has diverted troops to battle against Taliban militants increasingly seen as a threat to national security in the northwest, with the US also pressuring Islamabad to go after militants who attack in Afghanistan.

    The military has launched multiple campaigns in the last year to dislodge Taliban fighters from their strongholds in the northwest -- although the establishment still sees India as the primary threat.

    But army chief General Ashfaq Kayani, who witnessed the exercises along with Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani and other top civil and military officials, said Pakistan had no aggressive intent.

    "We harbour no aggressive designs against anyone but self defence is our inherent right and we will protect Pakistan at all costs," he said at a ceremony attended by reporters flown in to witness the spectacle.

    He added that Pakistan's army was "committed to play a positive role in contributing towards strategic stability in the region."

    Relations between Pakistan and India have been bedevilled by mistrust and tensions, exacerbated by the November 2008 attacks in the Indian city of Mumbai.

    In February, the two nuclear-armed South Asian neighbours held their first official talks since the Mumbai attacks, when 10 Islamist gunmen killed 166 people in the bustling financial capital.

    India blamed the attacks on Pakistan-based militants and said talks could only resume if Islamabad took concrete steps to bring those responsible to justice and cracked down on groups operating on its soil.
     
  12. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Pakistan army war games are to divert the attention of their people from fight for basic needs like water,electricity, and other problems on NORTH WEST and Baluchistan.any thing against India will have a good market there. for India and Indians its just a show done by some clo**s to entertain Pakistani people.
     
  13. veteran

    veteran 2nd Lieutant ELITE MEMBER

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    Bloody good one Chap.Pakistan is united just because of there ANTI-INDIAN sentiment.
     
  14. Indian_Idol

    Indian_Idol 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Pakistan army doing the job of Actors and Actress's... :D
     
  15. ek_indian

    ek_indian Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    This shows Pakistan's new strategy is based on India's cold start. Also the intensity and level of this new war games only point towards India.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2010

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