Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Pakistan Timeline: News, Discussions & Opinions

Discussion in 'South Asia & SAARC' started by tariqkhan18, Apr 14, 2010.

  1. Golden_Rule

    Golden_Rule Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    516
    Levina likes this.
  2. Rain Man

    Rain Man 2nd Lieutant POLITICAL ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2016
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    576
    Country Flag:
    India
  3. SrNair

    SrNair Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    Messages:
    1,082
    Likes Received:
    1,315
    Country Flag:
    India
    Well,they are the one that infiltrates terrorists in other nations not viceversa .So others should take extra caution .One more terrorists that uses
    this loophole to infiltrate in to Pakistan wont change the fabric of already radicalised Pak society
     
    Levina likes this.
  4. VCheng

    VCheng RIDER GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    1,787
    30 day temporary renewal stamped by a brainless clerk for travel back to Pakistan only.
     
    Levina likes this.
  5. VCheng

    VCheng RIDER GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    1,787
    The very definition of an intractable problem, self-created to boot:


    http://www.dawn.com/news/1314220/challenging-conventions

    Challenging conventions
    MUHAMMAD AMIR RANA


    THE recent action against Jamaatud Dawa (JuD) leaders is being interpreted in many ways. Some say it is an attempt to avoid sanctions by Donald Trump’s administration. Others link it with Chinese pressure. Only a few look at the development from an internal perspective.

    The emerging debate on internal security in recent months has mainly revolved around the status of banned organisations, madressahs and operations against militant networks in the urban areas mainly in Punjab. One of the major challenges confronting the state is about how to deal with conventional militant groups, including the JuD. These groups have developed huge infrastructures inside the country. Contrary to anti-Pakistan militant groups, these conventional groups are fairly visible on the ground and active within the domains of politics and social welfare. They are not involved in terrorist activities inside Pakistan, and are gradually becoming part of the far-right politics in the country.

    Security institutions are nonetheless worried about the members of such groups, who are being targeted for recruitment by various terrorist groups including the militant Islamic State (IS) group, Al Qaeda and the Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP).

    How should the state neutralise groups that once served a strategic purpose?

    These conventional militant groups also contribute to shaping Pakistan’s international image and often cause the state diplomatic stress — the JuD is on top among these groups. The dilemma for security institutions is that the world believes such groups are under the complete control of certain state institutions. It is difficult for the world to conceive of these groups operating independently when they exploit the state’s ideological and nationalist narratives and present themselves as custodians of state interests.

    Another major challenge for the state is how to neutralise groups that once served its strategic purpose. The most practised way in a post-insurgency perspective is to reintegrate them into mainstream society. However, many experts and most of Pakistan’s civil society believe that these groups should be treated under the rule of the law and that Pakistan must fulfil its commitments under UN Security Council resolutions.

    There is a need to reassess the ways of bringing such groups under the rule of law completely. The state can freeze their assets, shut down their charity and organisational operations, put their leaderships under different schedules of anti-terrorism laws, try their leaders in courts of law, and, in the worst case, strip them of their nationality. But will this eliminate the problem? Do we have an idea about the penetration of these groups in society, different layers of their members from mid to lower ranks, and their numerical strength? How will they behave and what kind of responses can they evolve?

    The case study of a self-proclaimed ‘second line of defence of every Muslim state’, Harkatul Jihad-i-Islami (HJI) may provide some insight. Once the biggest Pakistani jihadist group, active in Afghanistan and India-held Kashmir, it became a parasite of Al Qaeda and the Afghan Taliban pre-9/11 owing to internal rifts. Its founder, Qari Saifullah Akhtar, was killed last month while fighting against the Afghan security forces. It is significant that the once mythical jihadist leader’s death did not receive much coverage in mainstream or the militants’ media.

    The first Pakistani group to launch attacks on its own soil was HJI. Before the Lal Masjid siege in 2007, HJI and Lashkar-i-Jhangvi factions were behind most of the terrorist attacks carried out in Pakistan, mainly between 2002 and 2006. The Pakistani state had decided to dismantle HJI in 2003. Although a small group, HJI took more than nine years to become non-functional. During that time, it not only caused enormous damage to the country through terrorist attacks but also provided trained militants to other terrorist groups. It contributed towards the formation of the Punjabi Taliban groups, which comprised HJI’s splinter terrorist cells besides others. Militants from HJI also joined the ranks of Al Qaeda and the TTP.

    Those who oppose the reintegration of conventional militant groups argue that it will only encourage these groups, who will reconnect with their radical and violent agendas once the pressure is off them. They fear that these groups will continue nurturing hate narratives among Pakistani society. Few also see a design behind such initiatives by state institutions to cover up their proxies.

    However, the more important question is: what kind of the options are available for reintegration? Some look towards Saudi Arabian and certain Western models, which are mainly based on individual rehabilitation. Pakistan also has such models of detainees’ rehabilitation programmes and one can argue about their effectiveness. But reintegration of conventional militant groups is a different sort of challenge that requires our own local framework. Certain conventional groups, including JuD, have already developed far-right credentials, and their political reintegration can help to neutralise their radical tendencies.

    Certainly, the reintegration approach can be more effective for conventional groups; even among them, some will have a greater tendency to reintegrate as compared with others. Here one may argue that reintegration cannot resolve the whole issue of militancy and extremism in Pakistan, and that the possibilities of more radical ideological inspirations will remain in place — pushing the youth towards more organised militant groups. Despite all its weaknesses, IS is still able to inspire members of more conventional groups.

    Can the state evolve a reintegration framework with a zero-tolerance approach to violence? Can state institutions explore such probabilities within the limits of the rule of law and the Constitution? There remains the need to deconstruct radical narratives that have been nurtured over the past decades — without this, such narratives will continue to haunt members of these groups put to reintegration. Disconnecting conventional groups from anti-Pakistan terrorist groups will also be a challenge.

    It seems that the state is thinking about the future of these conventional groups, but it is not yet clear where this thinking process is headed.

    The writer is a security analyst.

    Published in Dawn, February 12th, 2017
     
    Blackjay and MilSpec like this.
  6. AbRaj

    AbRaj Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2016
    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    1,961
    Country Flag:
    India
    They are to much into their macho image to do any thing that would do any good to India.
    Honestly I think HS and Azhar outside "protective custody" are better for us.
     
  7. AbRaj

    AbRaj Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2016
    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    1,961
    Country Flag:
    India
    Islamabad High Court bars Valentine's Day celebration in public spaces
    AAMIR JAMI — UPDATED about 5 hours ago
    WHATSAPP
    223 COMMENTS
    PRINT
    The Islamabad High Court (IHC) on Monday prohibited the celebration of Valentine's Day in public spaces and government offices across the country 'with immediate effect'.

    A day before Valentine's Day, the Federal Ministry of Information, Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (Pemra) and the Islamabad High Commission were told by Justice Shaukat Aziz, who was hearing the case, to submit their replies regarding the immediate execution of the court's orders.

    Print and electronic media have also been warned to "stop all Valentine's Day promotions immediately", while Pemra has been ordered to monitor all mediums and send out notifications banning any related promotions.

    Do you agree with the Islamabad High Court's ban on Valentine's Day?
    YesNo
    VoteView Results



    The orders were given on a petition submitted by citizen Abdul Waheed, who maintained that promotions on mainstream and social media for Valentine's Day are "against Islamic teachings and should be banned immediately."

    The petition had further called for a ban on the celebration of Valentine's Day in public places, stating that, "in cover of spread of love in fact, immorality, nudity and indecency is being promoted which is against our rich culture."

    Every year, Valentine's Day draws a mixed response from Pakistani citizens, with some supporting and celebrating it, but a few protesting its observance.

    In major cities, various restaurants, delivery services and bakeries come up with Valentine's Day promotions.

    On the other hand, there are those who come up with anti-Valentine's campaigns, such as 'Haya Day' on university campuses and various 'Say no to Valentine's Day' campaigns throughout the country.

    Last year, President Mamnoon Hussain had urged Pakistanis to forego celebrtating Valentine’s Day, saying that it was not a part of Muslim tradition, but of the West.

    He had said, “Valentine’s Day has no connection with our culture and it should be avoided,” and added that the downsides of western culture had "adversely affected one of our neighbouring countries."
     
    Inactive likes this.
  8. lca-fan

    lca-fan Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Messages:
    1,877
    Likes Received:
    3,750
    Country Flag:
    India
    Schwifty, Inactive and AbRaj like this.
  9. VCheng

    VCheng RIDER GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    1,787
    Of course, Zarb-Azb has been a great success in uprooting the terrorists, but only officially:

    http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/is...-raise-fear-militant-attacks-pakistan-n719221

    Execution Leaflets Bring New ISIS Terror Fear to Pakistan
    by MUSHTAQ YUSUFZAI

    PESHAWAR, Pakistan — High in a remote, mountainous region of Pakistan, fearful residents have found leaflets containing ISIS propaganda that threaten attacks against their communities.

    The sheets feature the black flag of ISIS, alongside pictures of an execution and armed militants waving automatic rifles as they parade through streets, thought to be in Iraq or Syria.

    It's not clear who distributed the leaflets in the Kurram tribal area, and their origin cannot be independently verified by NBC News.

    Pakistan's government says ISIS has no real organizational presence in the country, and the papers may have been produced by lone sympathizers rather than the group's more central elements.

    [​IMG]
    An ISIS propaganda leaflet distributed in Pakistan. Hussain Ali


    However, American officials warned last year that ISIS is attempting to establish a foothold across the border with Afghanistan, and the group has claimed responsibility for several deadly attacks.

    The leaflets' appearance has worried recipients that the influence of the militant group is spreading into new areas.

    "We found these pamphlets in the morning," Amjad Hussain, 46, a tribesman in the town of Sadda, told NBC News. "I believe the militants came to our village in the night and distributed the pamphlets."

    Another tribesman, Javed Hussain, 43, said that even though their hostile region has been targeted by other militant groups in the past, the specter of ISIS was more threatening still.

    [​IMG]
    Pakistani soldiers stand guard at a checkpoint in Parachinar, capital of the Kurram tribal district, on Jan. 22. Basit Gilani / AFP-Getty Images



    More than 300 miles north, Kurram is no stranger to violence, with groups linked with al Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban carrying out attacks in recent years. The latest of these came last month when the Pakistani Taliban claimed a bomb blast that killed 30 people at a fruit and vegetable market in Parachinar, the province's main administrative town.

    But there's no evidence ISIS has ever planned to carry out an attack in Kurram — until now.

    In response to the leaflets, locals held a meeting Thursday and demanded the country's security forces come up with a strategy to nip the potential threat in the bud.

    "This is very, very serious threats to our community," local resident Akbar Hussain said. "We demanded of the government and military authorities to put strict security measures on the Pakistan-Afghanistan border so the terrorists can't enter Pakistan and kill our innocent people."

    This threat is made worse, he said, because the security forces have confiscated weapons from local villagers in an attempt to curb violence in this restive region.

    "Our border with Afghanistan is long and porous," Hussain added. "The terrorists can enter anywhere if proper security measures are not made."

    Ikramullah Khan, the top administrative official from Kurram province, said he was aware of the leaflets and the case was being investigated.

    Officials from Pakistan's government and military declined to comment when contacted by NBC News.

    Pakistan's government officially denies that ISIS has any meaningful presence in the country, although it does admit the group enjoys sympathizers and supporters.
     
    Schwifty and Inactive like this.
  10. VCheng

    VCheng RIDER GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    1,787
    http://www.dawn.com/news/1316123/la...ouse-razed-in-bajaur-father-brothers-arrested

    Lahore blast facilitator's house razed in Bajaur; father, brothers arrested
    ANWARULLAH KHAN — PUBLISHED about 3 hours ago
    15 COMMENTS
    PRINT
    The Frontier Constabulary and the Fata political administration razed the house of the suspected facilitator of the Lahore blast and arrested his father and two brothers from Bajaur on Monday.

    The measures were taken in accordance with the Frontier Crimes Regulations' (FCR) territorial responsibility clause, which states that for any mishap, the administration can take the community or family members of the perpetrator to task and punish them under a collective responsibility clause.

    SSP Operations Zahid Gondal of Punjab Police and DIG Traffic Lahore Capt (retd) Ahmad Mobin were among the 13 people killed in the attack, which also left at least 85 injured.

    The Jamat-ul-Ahrar had claimed responsibility for the attack.

    The suspect was arrested after video evidence placed him in the area of the blast, walking along with the suspected suicide bomber that blew himself on Mall Road near the Punjab Assembly amid a protest.

    In his confessional statement, shared by Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif in a media briefing on Feb 17, the suspect had said he hailed from a remote village in the Bajaur Agency.

    “I was associated with Jamaat-ul-Ahrar and they trained me,” the suspect said, adding that he had visited Afghanistan around 15 to 20 times.






















    ======================================

    And the Quran clearly says: "And no bearer of burdens will bear the burden of another."

    What a confused nation!
     
  11. IndoBot

    IndoBot FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2017
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    31
    Country Flag:
    India
    A bleak future ahead for liberals in Pakistan.
     
  12. Inactive

    Inactive Guest

    War Of Sanctuaries

    Zahid Hussain


    THE latest spate of deadly violence and the military’s punitive strikes on terrorist camps across the Durand Line has caused tensions between Kabul and Islamabad to escalate. This time, matters have gone beyond the usual blame game that is witnessed after each terrorist strike on either side of the border. In an unprecedented move, Pakistan has closed its border with Afghanistan and has issued shoot-on-sight orders to be carried out against trespassers.

    What triggered this fury is the trail of the latest surge in violence leading to militant groups operating from Afghanistan. After being driven out of the tribal areas, several factions of the Pakistani Taliban have found a safe haven across the border. The latest bloodbath indicates how quickly the militants have regrouped to launch barbaric acts of terror across Pakistan.

    While such spectacular and synchronised terror attacks require support and facilitation of the militant networks inside the country, safe havens across the border allow greater freedom of movement for militants. The long, porous border has made it much easier for militants to escape any crackdown.

    The Jamaatul Ahrar, which is responsible for the recent attacks claiming over 100 innocent lives, is the largest and most lethal of Pakistani militant outfits currently operating from the Afghan border region. The network has pledged allegiance to the militant Islamic State group (IS) making the situation much more dangerous.

    Cross-border safe havens are major obstacles in the fight against insurgencies and terrorism.

    The Pakistani military claims to have targeted some of the group’s hideouts along the border and killed some of its senior commanders. But one is not sure if such retaliatory actions could have destroyed the cross-border terror infrastructure that is believed to have the support of elements within the Afghan intelligence agencies. There is also some evidence of the group having links with factions of the Afghan Taliban.

    There is always a danger of escalation in such cases of cross-border actions. One cannot agree more with the Pakistani army chief seeking joint anti-terror efforts. But there is also the question of our cooperation with Kabul that has long blamed ‘state-sanctioned’ sanctuaries of the Afghan Taliban in Pakistan’s frontier regions for the terrorist attacks in Afghanistan.

    While one may not agree with the allegations that our intelligence agencies are involved in terrorist attacks inside Afghanistan, there is some element of truth to the contention that the Afghan insurgency could not have been sustained for so long without the Taliban finding safe havens in Pakistan. It is no more a secret that most Afghan Taliban leaders had been operating out of Pakistan.

    So one is not surprised that the Afghan government has handed over its own list of 85 insurgents that it says are taking sanctuary in Pakistan, in response to our demand for the extradition of 76 militants hiding in Afghanistan. Those wanted by the Afghan government include leaders of the Haqqani network and other Taliban commanders. The alleged Afghan patronage of Pakistani militants is seen as a tit-for-tat action to increase pressure on Pakistan, as the Kabul administration is confronted with a rising Taliban insurgency.

    This war of sanctuaries has been a major reason for the latest escalation of terrorist attacks both in Pakistan and Afghanistan. This dangerous approach of ‘my enemy’s enemy is my friend’ has provided terrorists greater space to operate, thereby threatening the entire region. Cross-border attacks only fuel hostilities between the two countries, making it more difficult for them to join hands in fighting the common enemy. Moreover, there is also a need for a clearer understanding of who is the enemy.

    Undeniably, cross-border sanctuaries are major obstacles in the fight against insurgencies and terrorism. It is not only true for Pakistan, but also for Afghanistan fighting its Taliban insurgency. Hostile relations between the two neighbouring nations have certainly made it much more difficult for them to deal with the scourge of terrorism.

    Afghanistan, too, has suffered massive civilian casualties in militant violence in the past few years. According to a recent UN report, 2016 was the bloodiest year in Afghanistan since the US invasion in 2001, with thousands of civilians killed in terrorist attacks, many of them women and children. A number of those attacks were claimed by insurgent groups linked with IS that have also been involved in attacks in Pakistan.

    Indeed, there is a long history of Pakistan and Afghanistan offering sanctuary to each other’s opponents — a major source of bitterness and mistrust between the two neighbours. While in the past, Afghanistan sheltered Baloch and Pakhtun separatists, Pakistan extended refuge to the mujahideen following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 and once more to the Taliban after the US invasion.

    The support for the Afghan ‘jihad’ militarised and radicalised the border region and this continues to haunt both sides. Islamabad’s concern over the support for the Baloch nationalist insurgency by Indian intelligence in Afghanistan has also aggravated relations between the two countries.

    Both countries must remove the main sources of tension between them in order to formulate a joint strategy to confront the challenges of terrorism and violent insurgency. The insurgencies, helped by cross-border sanctuaries and support networks, also weaken the host country’s sovereignty. The Afghan government’s contention that it does not have control over the region from where Pakistani militants operate is not very convincing. A similar argument was advanced by Pakistani authorities for not taking action against the Afghan Taliban leaders and fighters compromising the country’s authority.

    The formation of a joint anti-terrorism policy is vital to the interests of not only the two countries but also the regional and global fight against the terrorist menace. Pakistan’s move to secure the borders and restrict illegal cross-border movement is understandable, given the serious security situation. But its efforts cannot succeed with the current state of tension with Afghanistan. It is also important to build trust between the people of the two countries because their destinies are intertwined and they must end this destructive war of sanctuaries.



    http://www.dawn.com/news/1316222/war-of-sanctuaries
     
    AbRaj likes this.
  13. Inactive

    Inactive Guest

    9 killed in explosion in Lahore's Defence area

    AGENCIES | DAWN.COM | IMRAN GABOL


    A powerful explosion in an under-construction building in Lahore's busy Defence Y Block Market left nine people dead and more than 20 injured on Thursday.

    There were conflicting reports regarding the nature of the blast. Punjab government authorities initially claimed that the blast was the result of a "generator explosion", but multiple sources, including Nayab Haider, a spokesman for Punjab police, later said the explosion was caused by a bomb.

    A spokesperson for the Punjab Counter-Terrorism Department (CTD) corroborated the claim, saying that the blast "seems to have been made [sic] by some explosives".

    "It will become clear later whether it was IED timer [a timed improvised explosive device] or [a] remote-controlled device [and] whether the restaurant itself was [the] target or the explosive went off in transit," the spokesperson said.

    "Since building has collapsed, true picture will emerge later on," the spokesperson added. "Info will be shared with media as early as possible."

    The area where the first blast occurred is a busy locality with several commercial offices and eateries. Footage shows nearby offices including HBL, Toni and Guy, Gloria Jeans, Bombay Chowpatty, Jalalsons among others.

    Residents and nearby shoppers panicked when the explosion was heard, and eyewitnesses described people evacuating buildings and running from the scene of the incident.

    Broken crockery and furniture was strewn on the road in the area and the road appeared to be carpeted by shattered glass.

    'People were crushed'
    A Rescue 1122 official initially said as many as 35 people were moved to local hospitals, some with critical injuries. "The injuries are severe... the magnitude of the blast — the impact — is very high. One storey collapsed and people were crushed underneath."

    A witness who works at a bank in the market told Reuters that his workplace was shaken by a “frightening” explosion.

    “We left the building and saw that the motor-bikes parked outside were on fire and all the windows in the surrounding buildings were shattered,” the witness, Mohammad Khurram, said.

    Search operation ongoing
    The market was sealed by law enforcement personnel for a search operation. Teams from the Punjab Forensic Science Laboratory were dispatched to collect evidence.

    Parents were also told to take their children back home as schools in the area had been asked to shut down for the day, DawnNews reported.

    CCTV footage was requested from all shops in the area. DawnNews reported.

    Punjab law minister Rana Sanaullah said after the blast that: "There was no reason to target the building. I have been informed that plaza was not inaugurated yet."

    The report of the blast came as cities across Pakistan were put on high alert after a spate of deadly terror attacks.

    A day earlier, the military announced a massive urban counter-terrorism operation after a week of bombings in Punjab, Sindh, Fata, Khyber Pakhtunwa and Balochistan took at least 100 lives.


    Scenes from the blast site
    [​IMG]
    A bomb ripped through Lahore, the tenth attack in just under a fortnight pointing to a resurgence in violence. —AFP


    [​IMG]
    Officials examine the site after the bomb attack in Lahore. —AFP


    [​IMG]
    Scenes after a powerful bomb explosion in an under-construction building. —PPI


    [​IMG]
    Soldiers stand alert at the site of an explosion in Lahore. —AP


    [​IMG]
    Scenes after a powerful bomb explosion in an under-construction building. —PPI


    [​IMG]
    Police cordon off the area of explosion in Lahore. —AP


    [​IMG]
    the tenth attack in just under a fortnight pointing to a resurgence in violence. —AFP

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1316527/9-killed-in-explosion-in-lahores-defence-area
     
  14. Inactive

    Inactive Guest

    Securing Pakistan?

    FARHAN BUKHARI


    MEMBERS of Pakistan’s strategic community were jubilant earlier this year with the launch of the first ever submarine-based nuclear-capable ballistic missile followed by a long-range missile capable of carrying multiple nuclear bombs. The two events were characterised by some as nothing short of historic.

    And yet, a spate of recent terrorist bombings, notably the carnage at the historic Lal Shahbaz Qalandar shrine in Sehwan Sharif in Sindh, have exposed an uncomfortable truth — that securing Pakistan internally has become a bigger challenge than the country’s external front.

    The idea that Pakistan will be able to launch a ‘second nuclear strike’ following one by India in a future war, has cemented Pakistan’s ability to forestall such a devastating future exchange, goes the argument in support of the submarine-based missile. And yet, the recent tests and other similar events don’t have the capacity to forestall Pakistan’s downhill slide, amid a continuing crisis of governance, political disarray and a selective narrow economic uplift surrounded by weak prospects all around. In brief, Pakistan remains as insecure as it was before the missile tests in January.

    Even the attainment of a nuclear ‘triad’ — the ability to launch nuclear weapons via air, land and sea — cannot overcome Pakistan’s deepening security challenges. Though the democratic framework is set to remain in place barring unexpected developments, there is plenty more at stake beyond the matter of who gets to rule Pakistan after the next elections in 2018.

    Missile tests won’t forestall our downhill slide.
    The Sehwan Sharif attack has been quickly followed by claims, with considerable justification of such attacks emanating from elements in Afghanistan. And yet, the major internal gaps in governing Pakistan cannot be detached from the way Pakistan’s ability to defend itself has systematically weakened over time.

    Since last year, the sorry saga of the Panama leaks and its focus on Nawaz Sharif’s three children, says much about a wider malaise. Though it’s impossible to predict the outcome of an ongoing legal battle in the Supreme Court, what’s happening outside in the political arena is very telling.

    The PML-N has lost no opportunity to link their leader’s future over this saga to the future of democracy. In a country with a chequered political history torn between emerging civilian rule and military interventions, it’s all the more vital for the prime minister to quickly and decisively put this issue to rest.

    And for mainstream Pakistanis, there is no equally convincing way than a public disclosure of the full documentary evidence surrounding the sources of the family’s wealth that led to the purchase of property on London’s very exclusive Park Lane.

    Meanwhile, Pakistan’s real-life challenges have continued to evolve as never before with little evidence in sight for a dramatic uplift of the country’s outlook. Though surrounded by an escalating security challenge for more than 15 years since the 9/11 attacks forced Pakistan to join the US-led war on terrorism, the political mainstream, notably the federal and provincial legislatures have yet to sign off on a comprehensive new national security policy. Once evolved, the next goal of selling it to the Pakistani public will pose what could rightly be described as the biggest political challenge in the nation’s history.

    And while getting the public on board remains a major challenge, other equally daunting tasks are those of tackling Pakistan’s crisis of governance and gaps on the economic front.

    In the aftermath of the Sehwan bombing, gaps in the security fabric such as reports of ineffective walkthrough gates and far too few policemen on duty are alarming but not surprising. Over time, Pakistan has become a state which primarily caters to the well-endowed linked to the ruling structure. The crisis of governance hits those at the grass roots, be it in matters of dealing with the police or the municipal authorities or another branch of government. And while the finance minister has pronounced that Pakistan’s economy has emerged from the woods, nothing could be further from the truth.

    Tweaking numbers of poverty-stricken Pakistanis or playing around with definitions of what is poverty or not, simply will not change the reality. During the current prime minister’s tenure, Pakistan’s large employers of labour — agriculture and industry — have suffered badly. While the former has suffered from an unprecedented fall in commodity prices, the latter has borne the brunt of sluggish exports and continuing challenges such as electricity shortages.

    And for those who choose to celebrate matters like the rise of the stock market and growing car sales, mainstream Pakistan remains unimpressed. The succession of recent terror attacks leading to Sehwan Sharif has exposed a terrible truth — Pakistan is slipping internally even if it has been secured externally.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1316220/securing-pakistan
     
  15. lca-fan

    lca-fan Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Messages:
    1,877
    Likes Received:
    3,750
    Country Flag:
    India
    Pakistan on equipment buying spree to fight militancy
    Pakistanis set for at least three deals with the US this week to acquire military equipment and weapons to combat militancy

    Sajjad Hussain
    Pakistan: 8 killed, 35 injured in Lahore bomb blast

    Pakistan ordered the first three helicopters in August 2015 and placed an additional order for nine helicopters in April last year. A US Department of Defence notification said nine AH-1Z Viper helicopters would cost Pakistan an estimated $170.2 million.

    Pakistan’s original request included the sale of 1,000 AGM-114 R Hellfire II missiles as well. Pakistan will also receive four Russian-made Mi-35M attack helicopters in 2017. The US media noted that the Mi-35M was the export version of the Mi-24 gunship and was particularly suited for operations in mountainous terrain.

    Pakistan Army Aviation could acquire up to 20 Mi-35Ms in the years ahead. Islamabad is also considering the Turkish Aerospace Industries T-129 attack helicopter or the Chengdu Aircraft Industry Group Z-10 helicopter gunship as an alternative to the Mi-35M. The new gunships would slowly phase out Pakistan Army Aviation’s obsolete fleet of US-made AH-1 Cobra attack helicopters, the media reported.

    Pakistan signed another $35 million deal with a US firm, Navistar Defence, for manufacturing 40 mine-resistant ambush-protected MaxxPro Dash DXM vehicles. The contract, awarded under US foreign military sales arrangement, includes manufacturing of various support items, logistics and technical support services.

    At least eight persons were killed and 20 others injured on Thursday in a powerful explosion that ripped through a building in a defence locality in Lahore. On 16 February, a suicide bomber killed 88 people at a famed Sufi shrine in Sindh province. Following the attack, the army launched an offensive against militants and claimed to have killed more than 130 terrorists across the country.
    http://www.livemint.com/Politics/On...quipment-buying-spree-to-fight-militancy.html
     
    Inactive likes this.

Share This Page