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PLA Air Force conducts first patrol in air defense identification zone

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by layman, Nov 23, 2013.

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  1. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    BEIJING, Nov. 23 (Xinhua) -- The People's Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force conducted its first air patrol after the establishment of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone.

    Shen Jinke, spokesman for the PLA Air Force, said that two large scouts carried out the patrol mission, with early warning aircraft and fighters providing support and cover.

    "The patrol is in line with international common practices, and the normal flight of international flights will not be affected," Shen said.

    Shen said that the Chinese armed forces are capable of effective control over the zone, and will take measures to deal with air threats to protect the security of the country's airspace.

    On Saturday morning, the Chinese government issued a statement on establishing the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone. It also issued an announcement on the aircraft identification rules and a diagram for the zone.

    More Info
     
  2. aimarraul

    aimarraul 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    PLA Air Force conducts first patrol in air defense identification zone - Frontpage - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn

    The People's Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force conducted its first air patrol after the establishment of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone.

    Shen Jinke, spokesman for the PLA Air Force, said that two large scouts carried out the patrol mission, with early warning aircraft and fighters providing support and cover.

    "The patrol is in line with international common practices, and the normal flight of international flights will not be affected," Shen said.

    Shen said that the Chinese armed forces are capable of effective control over the zone, and will take measures to deal with air threats to protect the security of the country's airspace.

    On Saturday morning, the Chinese government issued a statement on establishing the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone. It also issued an announcement on the aircraft identification rules and a diagram for the zone.
     
  3. aimarraul

    aimarraul 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Background: Air Defense Identification Zones - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn



    CNTV.cn | 2013-11-24 10:25:42
    By Agencies


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    The airforce says it has conducted its first air patrol since the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone was announced. Reconnaissance and early-warning aircraft and warplanes were deployed. But what is an Air Defense Identification Zone, and how does it work?

    Air Defence Identification Zone is a zone that can extend in some cases up to 300 miles beyond the territorial sea. It’s established by some countries off their coasts for security reasons. When entering the zone, all aircraft are required to identify themselves, report flight plans, and inform ground control of their exact position.

    Military expert Yin Zhuo said, "Since the 1950s, some countries have demarcated Air Defense Identification Zones on high seas or international waters. It’s also called identification belt."

    Air Defense Identification Zone is an early-warning air defense concept. It has been implemented in more than 20 countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, South Korea and Japan.

    For example, after Japan’s surrender in 1945, the US demarcated an identification zone off Japan’s coasts, but it was under the control of the US military in Japan. It was only until 1969 that the US transferred the management of the zone to Japan.

    After that, Japan expanded the zone westward twice, once in 1972, the other in 2010. Japan follows a warning sequence for unidentified aircraft: radar detection, emergency calls, fighter emergency launch, requiring forced landing, and bomb warning. Once its own aircraft, land, or vessels are attacked, a defense war will be launched. However, territorial disputes still exist, as the zone is not recognised by Japan’s neighbors, Russia and China.




    Air defense identification zone a strategic decision: experts


    Xinhua | 2013-11-24 14:31:17
    By Agencies




    The establishment of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone is a strategic decision in accordance with China's current national security situation, experts told Xinhua on Sunday.

    "Setting up the air defense identification zone can effectively safeguard national sovereignty and security," said Zhang Junshe, a military expert, adding that the move conforms to the fundamental spirit and principle of international law.

    The Chinese government issued a statement on Saturday morning on establishing the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone. It also issued an announcement on the aircraft identification rules and a diagram for the zone.

    According to the announcement, China will take timely measures to deal with air threats and unidentified flying objects from the sea, including identification, monitoring, control and disposition.

    "The move also accords with common international practices as the United States and Canada took the lead around the world in setting up such zones starting in the 1950s," said Xing Hongbo, a military and legal expert, adding that more than 20 countries have set up air defense identification zones since then.

    "Various aircraft with high altitude and high-speed flying capabilities have been broadly used around the world with the development of aviation technology, and it's hard for China to identify an unidentified flying object and adopt countermeasures immediately," said Meng Xiangqing, a military expert.

    The establishment of the zone can help set aside early warning time to ascertain an aircraft's purpose and attributes and adopt measures to protect air defense security, Meng said.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  4. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  5. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Fact Sheet: China's Air Defense Zone

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    TAIPEI — What appears to be a crisis in the making, China’s Ministry of National Defense (MOD) has established the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) effective as of 10 a.m. on Nov. 23.

    The zone covers the disputed Diaoyu/Senkaku Islets claimed by China, Japan, and Taiwan. The islets are under the administrative control of Japan. China has been flying unmanned aerial vehicles into the area of the islets and Japan has threatened to shoot them down.

    China launched two aerial patrols, one Tu-154 and one Y-8, over the area the day of the announcement and Japan deployed two F-15 fighters to intercept.

    China’s ADIZ overlaps Japan ADIZ by approximately half, causing concern the overlap could start a war.

    The Chinese ADIZ also overlaps Taiwan (Republic of China/ROC). According to a Nov. 24 statement by Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan will “adhere to the principles set forth in the East China Sea Peace Initiative [set forth by President Ma Ying-jeou on Aug 5), with the aim of resolving disputes peacefully, while taking appropriate measures to ensure the safety of ROC airspace.†Ma’s five-point peace initiative urges all “parties to refrain from antagonistic actions; not abandon dialogue; observe international law; resolve disputes through peaceful means; and form a mechanism for exploring and developing resources on a cooperative basis.â€

    US Secretary of State John Kerry issued a statement on Nov. 23 urging China not to impose a “unilateral action†that “constitutes an attempt to change the status quo in the East China Sea.†Further, the US is “deeply concerned†about the announcement and “escalatory action will only increase tensions in the region and create risks of an incident.â€

    Below is a collection of Chinese MOD press releases since the announcement:

    MOD Press Release:

    The Ministry of National Defense of the People’s Republic of China, in accordance with the Statement by the Government of the People’s Republic of China on Establishing the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone, now announces the Aircraft Identification Rules for the East China Sea Air Defense

    Identification Zone as follows:

    First, aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must abide by these rules.

    Second, aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must provide the following means of identification:

    1. Flight plan identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone should report the flight plans to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China or the Civil Aviation Administration of China.

    2. Radio identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must maintain the two-way radio communications, and respond in a timely and accurate manner to the identification inquiries from the administrative organ of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone or the unit authorized by the organ.

    3. Transponder identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone, if equipped with the secondary radar transponder, should keep the transponder working throughout the entire course.

    4. Logo identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must clearly mark their nationalities and the logo of their registration identification in accordance with related international treaties.

    Third, aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone should follow the instructions of the administrative organ of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone or the unit authorized by the organ. China’s armed forces will adopt defensive emergency measures to respond to aircraft that do not cooperate in the identification or refuse to follow the instructions.

    Fourth, the Ministry of National Defense of the People’s Republic of China is the administrative organ of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone.

    Fifth, the Ministry of National Defense of the People’s Republic of China is responsible for the explanation of these rules.

    Sixth, these rules will come into force at 10 a.m. Nov. 23, 2013.

    MOD Press Release:

    The zone is being established in accordance with the Law of the People’s Republic of China on National Defense (March 14, 1997), the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Civil Aviation (October 30, 1995) and the Basic Rules on Flight of the People’s Republic of China (July 27, 2001).

    The zone includes the airspace within the area enclosed by China’s outer limit of the territorial sea and the following six points: 33º11’N and 121º47’E, 33º11’N and 125º00’E, 31º00’N and 128º20’E, 25º38’N and 125º00’E, 24º45’N and 123º00’E, 26º44’N and 120º58’E.
    MOD Q&A

    On Nov. 23, China’s Defense Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun took questions from the media on the issue:

    Following is the full text released by the MOD:

    Q: Why does the Chinese government decide to establish the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone? Is it related to the current situation in the region?

    A: Air Defense Identification Zone is an area of air space established by a coastal state beyond its territorial airspace to timely identify, monitor, control and react to aircraft entering this zone with potential air threats. It allows early-warning time and provides air security.

    Following the international practice, the Chinese government sets up the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone with the aim of safeguarding state sovereignty, territorial land and air security, and maintaining flight order. This is a necessary measure taken by China in exercising its self-defense right. It is not directed against any specific country or target. It does not affect the freedom of over-flight in the related airspace.

    Q: What is the basis for China to establish the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone?

    A: The setup of East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone by the Chinese government is not only based on adequate legitimate reference, but also in accordance with current international practice. Since the 1950s, more than 20 countries including some major countries and China’s neighboring countries have successively established Air Defense Identification Zones. Chinese government’s relevant behavior is in line with the UN Charter and other international laws and customs. China’s domestic laws and regulations such as the Law of the PRC on National Defense, the Law of PRC on Civil Aviation and Basic Rules on Flight have also clearly stipulated on the maintenance of territorial land and air security and flight order.

    Q: How is the coverage of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone defined? Why is the boundary of the Zone only 130 km away from some country’ territory?

    A: The coverage of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone is defined by China’s need for air defense and maintaining flight order.

    Actually the easternmost point of the Zone is so close to China that combat aircraft can soon reach China’s territorial airspace from the point. Therefore it is necessary for China to identify any aircraft from this point to assess its intentions and examine its identities so as to allow enough early-warning time for responsive measures in maintaining air security. In addition, some country established Air Defense Identification Zone as early as in 1969. The shortest distance from their zone to the Chinese mainland is also 130 km.

    Q: What responding measures will the Chinese side take when foreign aircraft enter the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone?

    A: Announcement of the Aircraft Identification Rules for the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone of the People’s Republic of China has made specific rules on the identification of aircraft in related airspace. In the face of air threats and unidentified flying objects coming from the sea, the Chinese side will identify, monitor, control and react depending on different situations. We hope that all parties concerned work actively with the Chinese side to jointly maintain flight safety.

    What needs to be specified is that the Chinese side has always respected the freedom of over-flight in accordance with international law. The establishment of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone does not change the legal nature of related airspace. Normal flights by international airliners in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone will not be affected in any way.

    Q: Will China establish other Air Defense Identification Zones?

    A: China will establish other Air Defense Identification Zones at the right moment after necessary preparations are completed.


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  6. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    TOKYO — Japan’s foreign minister on Sunday refused to recognize China’s newly claimed air defense zone over disputed islands, signaling that Japan would not back down as tensions increased in the maritime dispute.China on Saturday said its “air defense identification zone” would give it the right to identify and possibly take military action against aircraft near the islands in the East China Sea. The uninhabited islands are administered by Japan but claimed by China and Taiwan.

    China’s announcement appeared to be the latest step in what analysts have called a strategy to chip away at Japan’s claims of control of the islands. Japan has long maintained a similar air defense zone over them.

    The Japanese foreign minister, Fumio Kishida, called the Chinese declaration a dangerous escalation that could lead to what many military analysts most fear in the tense standoff: a miscalculation or accident that could set off an armed confrontation and drag the United States into the conflict.

    “It was a one-sided action and cannot be allowed,” Mr. Kishida told reporters, according to Japan’s Kyodo News. It could also “trigger unpredictable events,” he warned.

    The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs promptly rejected Mr. Kishida’s objections. “The Japanese side’s irresponsible comments about China’s demarcation of an East China Sea air defense identification zone are totally wrong,” a spokesman for the ministry, Qin Gang, said in comments published on its website on Sunday.

    In a statement on Saturday, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel warned that the American government viewed the Chinese move “as a destabilizing attempt to alter the status quo in the region.” He also reaffirmed that the United States would stand by its security treaty obligations to aid Japan if it were attacked.

    For now, the United States and Japan appear to be trying to determine how serious China is about policing its newly declared zone, or whether the declaration is a political gesture to try to appease nationalist sentiments. However, it is equally unclear how Japan would respond if China tries to enforce it. Mr. Kishida did not say whether Japan would take any countermeasures, like increasing patrols in the airspace over the islands, known as the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyu in China.

    Mr. Qin dismissed criticisms from Secretary of State John Kerry and Mr. Hagel, and said the Chinese Foreign Ministry had complained to the American ambassador to Beijing, Gary Locke, about their remarks.

    “The United States really should not take sides on the question of sovereignty over the Diaoyu islands,” Mr. Qin said.

    In a sign of the heightened tensions, Japan’s Defense Ministry said on Saturday that it had scrambled two F-15 fighter jets to intercept a pair of Chinese surveillance planes approaching the islands. It said the Chinese planes turned back without incident.

    A spokesman for the Chinese Ministry of National Defense accused Japan of using its defense zone to harass Chinese military planes.

    “This is seriously impeding freedom of flight, and could very easily trigger a safety accident or unexpected incident,” said the spokesman, Col. Yang Yujun.

    By setting up a competing air defense zone, China may be trying to show that its claim to the islands is as convincing as Japan’s, Japanese officials said. They said China appeared to have a similar objective last Thursday, when Chinese coast guard officers boarded a Chinese fishing boat near the islands.

    When hailed by a Japanese coast guard vessel, the Chinese coast guard crew said it was monitoring fishing in Chinese waters, Japan’s coast guard said.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/25/world/asia/japan-rejects-chinas-claim-to-air-rights-over-disputed-islands.html?_r=0
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Seems Chinese are pushing the limit of tolerance of the neighbouring nations.
     
  8. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    BEIJING, Nov. 24 (UPI) -- China's decision to set up an East China Sea air defense zone has further heated up its island dispute with Japan, raising deep concerns in the United States.
    There was a flurry of protests and official statements during the weekend from all sides arising from China's surprise announcement that it has set up an East China Sea "Air Defense Identification Zone" that encompasses the Senkaku Islands, which Japan controls and has covered with an air defense zone of its own. The islands, which are also claimed by China, are a source of bitter dispute between Tokyo and Beijing, and the latest step by China is seen as further escalating the tensions.

    In a strongly worded statement Saturday, Secretary of State John Kerry said the United States is "deeply concerned" about China's announcement. He warned China its "unilateral action" is an attempt to change the status quo in the East China Sea and that such escalatory action will "only increase tensions in the region and create risks of an incident."

    The secretary also said freedom of over flight and other internationally lawful uses of sea and airspace are essential to prosperity, stability and security in the Pacific.

    "We don't support efforts by any state to apply its ADIZ procedures to foreign aircraft not intending to enter its national airspace," Kerry's statement said. "The United States does not apply its ADIZ procedures to foreign aircraft not intending to enter U.S. national airspace. We urge China not to implement its threat to take action against aircraft that do not identify themselves or obey orders from Beijing."

    Under the defense zone umbrella, China can identify and may even take military action against planes near the islands in the East China Sea. The islands also are claimed by Taiwan.

    Separately, Japan lodged a protest with China. Junichi Ihara at the Japanese Foreign Ministry told Han Zhiqiang, senior diplomat at the Chinese Embassy, on phone that the Chinese action may escalate current bilateral tensions over the Senkaku Islands, which China refers to as Diaoyu, Kyodo News reported.

    A senior Japanese Defense Ministry official called Beijing's move an "action to demonstrate that the Senkakus are their territory."

    China in turn lodged its own protests against the United States and Japan.

    Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said Assistant Foreign Minister Zheng Zeguang in his representation with U.S. Ambassador Gary Locke asked the United States "to correct its mistakes immediately and stop making remarks irresponsibly," the official media said.

    Qin was quoted as saying AIDZ complies with the United Nations Charter and international practices.

    "Its aims are to protect China's state sovereignty and territorial and airspace safety," he said, adding the move "aims at no specific nation or target and will not affect the freedom of over-flight in relevant airspace."

    The Foreign Ministry spokesman repeated China's stand that the Diaoyu and its surrounding islets are an inherent part of the Chinese territory and China "will firmly defend the territorial sovereignty over the Diaoyu islands," and that the current situation is derived "from the wrong words and deeds of the Japanese side."

    Qin also said Japan's remarks are "groundless and utterly wrong."

    The maritime territorial dispute over the uninhabited islands escalated more than a year ago after the Japanese government purchased three of the five main islands in the Senkaku group from a private Japanese owner.

    The New York Times said Japan's refusal to accept China's AIDZ indicated Japan would not back down from its stand. The Times quoted analysts that a miscalculation or an accident resulting form the dispute could trigger an armed confrontation which could drag the United States into it.

    U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel was quoted as saying the United States would stand by its security treaty obligations to aid Japan if it were attacked.

    For now, the Times said both the United States and Japan want to determine if China's move is merely designed for domestic consumption.

    The Wall Street Journal, quoting a senior U.S. official Sunday, said there were no immediate plans to fly American planes into the expanded air defense identification zone.

    "We will ensure our view of how the U.S. operates in that area is clear," the official said. "At some point there will be something to demonstrate that."

    The Journal quoted foreign military officials and analysts that the Chinese military has little experience in conducting interceptions farther from its territory. The report also quoted a senior U.S. official that China's move was unexpected and surprising as top U.S. officials were busy working on the interim deal with Iran.

    Some analysts told the Journal they expect China to eventually set up a similar ADIZ over the South China Sea.

    China's claims over the South China Sea issue is already a matter of deep concern to neighboring countries including Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan, Brunei and the Philippines.



    Read more: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-N...and-dispute/UPI-35201385352531/#ixzz2ldjdEPd7
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2013
  9. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    They are testing their neighbors, Japan and India should make an alliance gathering the Philippines, Vietnam and the US
     
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  10. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    China's newly set up air defense zone also overlaps S. Korea's: official

    The air defense identification zone China set up Saturday over the East China Sea partially overlaps with South Korea's, the South Korean Defense Ministry said Sunday.

    The Ministry of National Defense expressed regret over the Chinese move and said the South Korean government plans to hold talks with China over the issue.

    South Korea's Yonhap News Agency said the overlapping space in the air defense identification zones set up by the two countries covers an area 20 kilometers by 115 km west of South Korea's Jeju island.

    China's Ministry of National Defense announced Saturday that it has established an air defense identification zone over the East China Sea covering islands controlled by Japan but claimed by China and Taiwan.

    On the same day, Japan filed a strong protest with China, saying the Chinese move would escalate tensions in the region.

    The United States said Saturday it has conveyed its "strong concerns" to China for setting up an air defense identification zone over the Senkaku Islands, saying it "increases regional tensions and affects U.S. interests and those of our allies."

    U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said in a statement Saturday that the United States reaffirms that the 1960 U.S.-Japan security treaty covers the Senkakus, known in China as Diaoyu and in Taiwan as Tiaoyutai.

    China's air force carried out its first air patrol hours after establishment of the zone, which serves as national defense perimeters to judge whether fighters should be scrambled when foreign aircraft enter without prior notification.

    The Japanese Defense Ministry said two Chinese planes entered Japan's air defense identification zone Saturday, prompting the Air Self-Defense Force to scramble fighter aircraft.

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  11. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    China and Japan appeared last night to be a step closer to a military confrontation that could drag in the United States, after Beijing extended its air-defence zone over a group of islands that is also claimed by Tokyo.

    Experts have voiced growing concern about tensions over the five uninhabited, barren islets and three rocks in the East China Sea known as the Senkakus in Japan or Diaoyus in China. South Korea and Taiwan also claim the islands.

    The US has a mutual self-defence treaty with Japan, and last year it specifically confirmed this covered the islands. Washington said that an armed attack against Japan or the US would prompt each to “act to meet the common danger”.

    In the latest sabre-rattling, the Chinese Defence Ministry yesterday issued a map of its East China Sea Air “defence identification zone”, which included the islands. Beijing warned it would take “defensive emergency measures” against any aircraft failing to identify itself in the islands’ airspace . It added it would “identify, monitor, control and react” to air threats.

    “This is a necessary measure taken by China in exercising its self-defence right,” spokesman Yang Yujun was quoted as saying. “It is not directed against any specific country or target. It does not affect the freedom of over-flight in the related airspace.”

    A Japanese Foreign Ministry spokesman said Japan had lodged a protest at China’s embassy in Tokyo and reiterated its position that the islands belong to Japan. “Setting up such airspace unilaterally escalates the situations,” the Foreign Ministry said.

    Earlier this month, Japan’s military staged amphibious landings on some similarly uninhabited islands; 34,000 troops were involved. Patrol ships from both countries have been shadowing each other for months.

    Dr John Swenson-Wright, senior consulting fellow at Chatham House and Cambridge University expert on modern Japanese politics and international relations, said yesterday that many experts on the region were becoming increasingly alarmed, particularly because China was building up forces that could “directly challenge Japan’s ability to maintain control over the islands”.

    He estimated the chances of some kind of military conflict were “certainly no higher than 20 per cent”, but added: “I think we should be worried about it, because we have seen in the last two years a growing, steady increase in the willingness of China to challenge Japan’s claim ...China knows it would be outclassed [militarily] by the US and Japan, notwithstanding all the talk about the rise of China as a maritime power.

    “Nobody wants a war – but that’s what they said in 1914.”

    He said the US would be “very worried” about the situation and would probably try to build bridges.
    Washington could be drawn into dispute as Japan and China square up over uninhabited islands - Asia - World - The Independent
     
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  12. SreeKrishnaRaja

    SreeKrishnaRaja FULL MEMBER

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    The chinese has a awful history of annexing territories of neighbouring nations by force illegally.

    It annexed Tibet, AkasiChin(India).

    It now claims parts of Arunachal Pradesh (India) , parts of Sikkim (India), South China Sea oil feilds (Vietnam), islands of Japan.

    Permanent Member seat of China in UN security council should be removed. Allowing a medieval era minded nation in UNSC with veto rights spoils the Name & purpose of UNSC.
     
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  13. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    You know what i like of India?
    India is a country very peaceful and Japan now is defending their rights basicly they are standing against a bully, China won`t do any thing, they are doing things for their people just to look strong, but as Long as the US supports Japan China won`t dare to do a thing against Japan, that is the reason the Japanese are sending their F-15s even on saturday and the Chinese just turned, China knows Okinawa is close and the US once sided with Japan has superiority over China
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2013
  14. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Air defense zone won't affect flight freedom: experts

    BEIJING, Nov. 25 (Xinhua) -- Establishment of China's air defense identification zone won't affect the flight freedom of other countries' aircraft, military experts reiterated on Sunday.

    Foreign aircraft need only to report information such as their nationalities and flight plans, and follow other relevant instructions after they enter the zone, military expert Chai Lidan explained.

    The aim is to better locate and identify flying objects in the zone, rather than to limit their freedom of flight, Chai added.

    On Saturday morning, the Chinese government issued a statement on establishing the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone. It also issued an announcement on aircraft identification rules and a diagram for the zone.

    Experts insist that the establishment of the zone accords with international common practices.

    Since the United States established the first air defense identification zone in 1950, more than 20 countries and regions have set up such zones. Japan, which responded fiercely over China's air defense identification zone, also has such a zone.

    Following the zone's instructions will in fact bring more security for aircraft flying over the East China Sea, military expert Meng Xiangqing said.

    The zone will help reduce military misjudgment, avoid aerial friction and safeguard the flight order and safety, Meng said.

    However, the rules set for the zone have been distorted and much-hyped by some countries, which are misleading their people that "entering the identification zone is an encroachment of the country's territorial space," and declaring "Chinese military threat theory," said Xing Hongbo, a military and legal expert.

    Such distortion and hype are apparently ill-intentioned, Chai also said.

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  15. tunguska

    tunguska Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Japan warns of unpredictable events over China's new air zone

    TOKYO —
    Japan warned Sunday of the danger of “unpredictable events” and South Korea voiced regret following China’s unilateral declaration of an air defense zone over areas claimed by Tokyo and Seoul.

    Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said his country was considering making stronger protests “at a higher level” after China announced Saturday it was setting up the zone over an area that includes Tokyo-controlled islands claimed by Beijing.

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Sunday they were “deeply concerned” at China’s move and were committed to defending Japan.

    China said it was setting up the “air defense identification zone” over an area including the islands in the East China Sea to guard against “potential air threats”.

    It released a set of aircraft identification rules that must be followed by planes entering the area.

    Kishida told reporters that Japan cannot accept the Chinese measure, calling it “a one-sided action which leads us to assume the danger of unpredictable events on the spot”, in remarks that later drew a rebuke from Beijing.

    China said it “firmly” opposed Japan’s remarks, with Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang calling them “groundless and utterly wrong”, according to the official Xinhua news agency.

    Qin, who also urged the United States not to take sides over the issue, said Beijing had “lodged representation” with U.S. ambassador Gary Locke over the American response to the air zone, calling for Washington to correct its mistakes.

    Qin said the aims of the zone, which he asserted complies with international law, “are to protect China’s state sovereignty and territorial and airspace safety”. He added that the move did not target any specific nation “and will not affect the freedom of over-flights in relevant airspace.”

    The dispute over the islands, known as the Senkakus in Japan and the Diaoyus in China, heated up last year when Japan’s government bought some of them from a private owner.

    China has since sent coastguard vessels and other state-owned ships as well as aircraft close to the islands, sometimes breaching asserted airspace and territorial waters around them.

    This has prompted Japanese coastguard boats and air force fighter jets to try to warn them off.

    The Japanese defense ministry said Saturday two Chinese planes entered Japan’s own air defense identification zone over the East China Sea, prompting its air defense force to scramble fighter aircraft.

    The ministry lodged a strong protest with a minister at the Chinese embassy in Tokyo by telephone.

    Hagel reiterated that the islands fall under the U.S.-Japan security treaty, meaning that Washington would defend its ally Tokyo if the area is attacked.

    He made it clear that the United States, which stations more than 70,000 troops in Japan and South Korea, would not respect China’s declaration of control over the zone.

    However, Washington has repeatedly said it takes no position on the islands’ ultimate sovereignty.

    Japan has vowed not to cede sovereignty or even to acknowledge a dispute with China over the islands.

    It accuses its neighbor of trying to change the status quo through intimidation.

    Former Japanese foreign minister Masahiko Komura, speaking as deputy head of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, said defense officials of the two countries must keep in close communication “to prevent a touch-and-go situation from arising”.

    In Seoul, South Korea’s defense ministry said the Chinese zone partly overlapped its own.

    “We find it regretful that China’s air defense zone partly overlaps with our military’s KADIZ (Korean Air Defense Identification Zone) in the area west of Jeju Island,” said a ministry statement, according to Yonhap news agency.

    “We will discuss with China the issue so as to prevent its establishment from affecting our national interests.”

    A military source quoted by Yonhap said the overlapping area is 20 kilometers wide and 115 kilometers long.

    The Chinese zone also includes a South Korean-controlled submerged rock that lies within the two countries’ overlapping economic zones, according to a South Korean defense ministry official quoted by the news agency.
     
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