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Population based on “Resource Sufficiency Evaluation” is Crucial

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by santosh, Mar 29, 2014.

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  1. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Real Threat to Environment is Increasing Population

    Sunday, June 5, was World Environment Day. A day when polyester-fibre ribbons were cut and bulky books and reports using bleached fine stationery and funds from international agencies launched in CFC-using air conditioned wood-panelled halls. A day when the elites had the satisfaction of doing something for the environment and when schools encouraged children to use wax crayons and synthetic paints to paint trees and animals (which most of them have never seen except from the balcony of the resort-room in vacation or a fleeting glance of a black-buck when the family went on tiger-watching safari but failed to see one) on fine grade virgin-paper.

    Some enthusiastic urban yuppies parked themselves for a few extra hours in front of the PC to shoot a thousand mails to countless like-minded about their wish to switch off power for an hour on a particular day to ‘Save Environment’. This will be followed by couple of parties and boozing sessions to finalise the plans, which are then communicated through more emails, phone calls, bike rallies, SMS and so on.

    India’s problem with the environment is best illustrated and manifested at the safari parks. Moneyed and fat, gutkha-chewing and power-wielding urban families land in the finest forest resorts in subsidised diesel-burning expensive SUVs with the most expensive cameras and gadgetry to watch tigers and (lions if the place is Gir forest). Early in the morning, hundreds of them turn out, ready to shell out Rs3,000-Rs4,000 for an entry permit, entry ticket, guide charges, vehicle fees etc, outside the forest department offices. :tsk:

    A caravan of 50 SUVs, each loaded with about eight to 10 people, all searching for a tiger. Soon the guides create excitement over a wireless message about a tiger spotting some distance away.

    They wear an earnest air to convince you. When you return frustrated, they congratulate every one. “Boss, do you see that? You are damn lucky! The tiger passed just 5-minutes back…. See that fresh tiger-potty…. It wasn’t there 15 minutes earlier. Its still watery….”. I will spare you the banal details of what all the guides hard sell.

    The cubs, the children and adults then go back with souvenirs of Save the Tiger T-shirts and caps. Can any one in a sane state of mind actually believe that the tiger or even a wild sparrow wait at a corner under a thicket when a circus of a dozen diesel-guzzling and noise-belching vehicles pass by? Do 500 people who have spent about Rs10,000 per head for a jungle vacation really believe that a tiger will be waiting to give them a ‘darshan’ amid high-pitched-cacophony in all the spoken languages of India?

    These people maybe silly, like most of us are, but they are not ill-meaning. They just don’t know what to do about the environment: so they decide to spend their hard-earned money to at least see it. Someone needs to tell them what they can do to not ruin it; there is no need to make a patronising statement to save it.

    The whole circus of environment protection in India is heading towards becoming a farcical industry. They are far from talking about the real problem. Under the disguise of development and growth, the spineless politicians and money-multiplying industries will want to avoid talking about it. The economists have re-packaged the weakness as strength. The real problem lies in the ever-increasing population of India. With 1/5 of the world’s population, we have only 1/20 of the world’s land. We also have the world’s highest population growth rate on such a scale of population. For a simple comparison, we don’t even have one-third the land resources that China has. :facepalm:

    How is a fragile eco-system of a river or even a sea, if some 5 billion people use a flush daily? How can rain forests exist if the country consumes several lakh tons of tea every morning? Like the disappearing Aravalli Hills, most of the hills near urban sprawls will soon be history as they will be consumed for mammoth construction projects as raw material. This nation needs an immediate re-look at the population policy and consumption of resources for industries if we don’t want to end up killing each other for a glass of fresh water or for a breath of fresh air. Will any economist, environmentalist please stand up on this occasion to tell the truth — where will we head with the exponential multiplication of our population?

    Real threat to environment is increasing population - India - DNA
     
  2. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    High Population Growth Rate: A Threat to food security Initiatives in Africa
    APRIL 15, 2013

    My son, had I known before, the negative effects of having many children, I would have stopped on two children. I am finding it extremely difficult to ably feed my large family comprising of two women and 16 children, using my four acres of land, which I and my family entirely depend on for survival. To make matters worse, yields from my farm, have over the years been reducing, due to declining soil fertility and as thus, we occasionally eat once in a day.

    ” Those were the words of Nabudere Patrick, a resident of Namanyonyi Sub County, Mbale district, located in eastern Uganda. Millions of other African small-scale farmers are facing the same scenario.

    According to the United Nations Population Fund, the global population could increase by as much as two billion in the next 25 years. If this happened, world food production would have to double to provide food security for the projected population in 2025. How are African countries positioning themselves in this regard?http://*********************/forum/images/smilies/facepalm4.gif

    Across Africa, the rate at which population is increasing is so alarming. It is increasing at rate that is far higher than food production in the continent. In fact, African countries like Rwanda, Niger, Uganda, Nigeria, Kenya and Senegal are experiencing a population growth rate of between 2.8-3.4 percent per annum, which is unacceptably high and making itdifficult for these countries to feed their people.

    Uganda, which is currently experiencing a high population growth rate of 3.4 per cent per annum – third highest in the world after that of Niger and Mayotte – is already feeling the negative consequences of a skyrocketing population growth. According to the country’s ministry of agriculture, animal industry and fisheries report of 2009, 17.7 million people out of a total population of 33 million people are food insecure.

    Though African countries have made and are making agricultural stimulation policies and programs aimed at increasing food production, the efforts are being undermined by a high population growth rate.

    This is made worse by traditional inheritance systems, which are highly practiced and respected across African societies. For instance, if a father of 10 children has 5 acres of land and he dies, each of his children will inherit half an acre on which to put a homestead and practice farming. Their children will also be given share of this half an acre. What

    this will lead to is some lineage family members will find themselves with nowhere to put a home and practice farming. Therefore they will be forced to move to towns and cities to make ends meet. Can a family of say five people, which in African setting is too small, really be food secure through utilizing half or a quarter of an acre of land?

    Skyrocketing population is also responsible for land fragmentation in Africa, whereby family members who find themselves not inheriting enough land to accommodate their homestead and farming aspirations keep on buying small pieces of land in different areas to utilize for food production purposes. This is proving difficult for farmers to effectively utilize due to geographical distance between these small farms.http://*********************/images/smilies/tsk.gif

    Due to this scenario, many smallscale farmers in Africa have found themselves unable to effectively curb disease and pests outbreaks as they find themselves applying different methods.

    We need to stay aware that the agricultural sector in Africa is dominated by small-scale farmers.They constitute 70 percent of people engaged in the sector. As farm sizes keep on decreasing, due high population growth rate, so is food production from these small farms. In the end this is also making small scale farmers earn smaller incomes. This partly explains why 65 percentof small-scale farmers’ households are still trapped in poverty cycle, surviving on less than $2 a day.

    It is important for us to note that the negative implications of population growth on food production and food security pose major threats to human health, the economy, the environment and wildlife, as more and more forests, national parks, wetlands and other ecological lands, are increasingly being cleared by the increasing population in search of more land for cultivation for food production purposes. http://*********************/forum/images/smilies/toilet.gif

    In my extensive travels and work engagements with grassroots farmers in rural Africa, I have observed that women are the dominant workers in the agricultural sector. They also produce on average seven children. In addition to feeding the babies, they are also burdened with domestic chores like looking for firewood, cooking, and fetching water, which all drastically reduce on their time in agricultural sector. Consequently it contributes to food insecurity in their homes.

    In sum, African countries should do whatever is possible, like designing and implementing population control programs, complemented by small-scale farming agricultural stimulating strategies, geared towards make small-scale farming productive and profitable. It is the only way if we are to attain food security and sustainable economic transformation powered by agricultural sector.

    High Population Growth Rate: A Threat to food security Initiatives in Africa.
     
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  3. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    double post
     
  4. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    this issue is being discussed in the thread as below, with my own statement on the post#6 as below :coffee:

    Population based on “Resource Sufficiency Evaluation” is Crucial | Indian Defence Forum

    => we also demand a "Population Tax" on every non-first child, as below. even with $10 for every non-first kid taking birth in any family of world would be a start, as discussed in the post#14 and #15 of the same thread as below too :tup:

    Population based on “Resource Sufficiency Evaluation” is Crucial | Page 2 | Indian Defence Forum

    => its so simple to discuss that even if so many kids taking birth in India, including in other parts of world, at least 25% to upto 50% of them are affected with Malnutrition, suffering from proper nutrition. so why to have high population, more than one kid per family, until "Resource Sufficiency Evaluation" is conducted first? :tsk:
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2014
  5. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    duplicate post
     
  6. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    China's one-child policy means many benefits for parents

    Li Tianhao has just given birth to a baby boy blessed with his mother's nose, his father's mouth and an impressive ability to sleep through even the loudest disturbance.

    It is a skill the newborn will be fortunate to maintain as he has been born in Henan, the most crowded province in the world's most populous nation as the human family edged closer to the 7 billion mark.

    Yet he will probably grow up alone. Although Henan last year became the first province in China to register its 100 millionth resident giving it a population bigger than any country in Europe it also claims some of the greatest successes in taming demographic growth through its family planning policies.

    This has not happened by accident. Henan is one of the most environmentally stressed areas of China with a quarter of the water and a fifth of the land per capita compared to the already low national average.

    Senior family planners say this justifies rigid restrictions. "The large number of people has put very big pressure on all resources, especially water," said Liu Shaojie vice director of the Population Commission in Henan. "Over 30 years of effort, we have put in place a systematic procedure for controlling the population. That has eased the impact on the environment. We are doing glorious work." http://*********************/images/smilies/china2.gif

    Many environmentalists agree that population control is essential if humanity is to move on to a more sustainable track, but how can this be done? China has gone further than any nation in trying to answer this question over the past 30 years. But both the means and the ends remain the subject of fierce controversy.

    When the one-child policy started in the 1970s, Liu says, women in Henan gave birth to an average of 5.8 children in their lifetimes. Their counterparts today have less than 1.7. The change, he said, means 30 million fewer births – equivalent to preventing one every 30 seconds for three decades. And that is just in Henan. Across all of China, the government claims there would be more than 300 million more children without the family planning policy.

    This policy was initiated primarily for economic and education reasons, but it is increasingly cited as an environmental blessing. According to Liu, the population controls have kept sulphur dioxide emissions down by 17.6% and the main source of water pollution by 30.8%. Without it, he says, the average person in Henan would have a third less land and a quarter less forest. It has also, he claims, prevented between 137m and 200m tonnes of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere. :cheers:

    Such extrapolations are questionable. The current measures were not put in place to save the global environment, but to redress one of the biggest errors made by Mao Zedong. The founder of the People's Republic was advised in the 1950s that China's population was growing dangerously fast, but he urged women to have more babies because, as he put it, they were like aircraft carriers launching fighter planes. Today, Chinese officials and scholars privately describe this as Mao's greatest mistake. If he had put in place a two-child policy in the fifties, today's one-child policy would not be necessary.

    The description of the system as a "one-child policy" is misleading. Most married women in China have the chance to bear two offspring, but the entitlement to breed beyond a solitary child is determined by a complex set of rules that vary from province to province and are often applied differently from village to village.

    Broadly speaking, urban couples are allowed one child, rural families can try for a second if the first is a girl and women from ethnic minorities are permitted to give birth two or three times in their lifetime. But there are close to a dozen exceptions, including if a baby has disabilities or if the mother and father are both single children. Communist cadres and government officials can be fired for procreational transgressions because they are supposed to set an example. By contrast, Tibetans have the fewest restrictions.

    Money is another key factor. The rich in Shanghai and Beijing can easily afford the penalties for a second or third child. The poor in Gansu and Yunnan, by contrast are at risk of having their meagre property confiscated if they fail to remain within birthing quotas.

    For family planners like Liu, these injustices and disturbances are seen not as failures, but as aberrations that call for policy tweaks. Countless adjustments over the past 30 years have created a mind-bogglingly complex system that touches on everything from contraception and sterilisation to pensions and tax incentives. In Henan alone, Liu says the family planning policy employs 17,000 administrators and 22,000 nursing and technical staff. In addition, support organisations claim a combined membership of 9,600,000 volunteers, who engage in work as diverse as spreading propaganda to monitoring menstruation cycles- something that is still common in villages though rare in cities.

    The state has gone to remarkable lengths to try to fill the gaps left by the missing children. Rule-abiding parents can get a monthly stipend, extra pension benefits when they are older, preferential hospital treatment, first choice for government jobs, extra land allowances and, in some case, free homes and a tonne of free water a month. Their children are even given bonus points in middle school entrance exams.

    The system is incredibly expensive. The provincial government sets aside 40 yuan per person for the policy, which adds up to 4bn yuan (£400m) or about four percent of its budget, but this is just a small fraction of the total amount paid by central and village authorities.

    Enforcement requires a huge and powerful bureaucracy. "Henan has much to teach the world in family planning, but it is a hard lesson to learn. Officials from Africa and India come to study what we are doing in China, but I'm not sure that they can apply it the same way," said Liu. "That's because they don't have a Communist party so it is difficult for them to take such strong steps."

    In theory, the only penalties are hefty fines - in Henan's case, three times the annual net income of the couple who have violated the rules. But the system still relies on a high degree of intrusiveness and communal pressure to achieve targets.

    Others argue that the impact of family planning is overblown and simply accelerated what would have happened anyway as a result of improvements in infant mortality, greater participation by women in the workforce and greater availability of contraception.

    As China becomes richer and better educated, women in rich cities like Shanghai and Beijing are opting for few children just like their counterparts in wealthy nations. And with the nation's population is forecast to peak around 2030 many say the family planning policy had outlived its usefulness.

    "Everybody agrees change is necessary. But the debate is about how to start and when", said Zheng Zhenzhen, a population specialist at the Chinese Academy of Social Science.

    "We debate the relationship between the size of the population and resource consumption. But it is not a fixed formula. It depends on how you utilise your resource. We waste and pollute. I think those problems – behaviour – are more important than the size of the population."

    In Henan, however, the message that you can consume more if you breed less appears to be more persuasive than threats and penalties.

    At the Hui hospital, the new father Li Yongli says he would rather have a first car than a second child. The shift towards fewer legs and more wheels in his family is part of a carefully worked out plan. The final goal is to ensure a better life and education for his son, who was of course, born exactly to schedule.

    "It's all part of the program," said the beaming father.

    Additional reporting by Cecily Huang

    China's one-child policy means many benefits for parents
     
  7. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    400 million births prevented by one-child policy
    (People's Daily)

    The global population will hit 7 billion at the end of this October, according to the 2011 State of World Population Report issued by the U.N. Population Fund on Oct. 26.

    As the "Day of 7 Billion" is drawing near, reporters have learned from the National Population and Family Planning Commission that the global population grows by about 80 million people every year. Since China introduced the family planning policy over 30 years ago, the policy has prevented 400 million births, and delayed the "Day of 7 Billion" for five years.

    The proportion of China's population to the world's total has dropped from 22 percent in the early stages of reform to 19 percent in 2010. Without the family planning policy, the country’s population would have already exceeded 1.7 billion.


    China facing five major population problems

    The first problem is the steady growth of its population. The country's population is expected to reach nearly 1.5 billion by 2020.

    Second, the overall quality of population is relatively low. China's labor productivity is not only much lower than that of developed countries but also lower than some emerging economies.

    Third, the issues in the population structure are outstanding. The overall sex ratio at birth is still relatively high. The aging of population is accelerating.

    Fourth, China's population is becoming increasingly mobile. The next 20 to 30 years will be a period when China's urbanization is fully accelerating and China's population mobility is at the largest scale and in the most active period. There will be about 300 million people moving from villages to towns and cities in China during that period.

    Fifth, the traditional function of the family is weakening. The size of families continues to shrink and the families composed only of elderly people and single-child families are accounting for larger proportions.

    Stick to the birth-control policy http://*********************/images/smilies/china2.gif

    China will still regard the birth-control policy as a fundamental state policy and adhere to it for a long period.China will try hard to guarantee the consistency and stability of the birth-control policy and maintain its total fertility rate at around 1.8 :tup:

    400 million births prevented by one-child policy - People's Daily Online
     
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  8. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    duplicate post
     
  9. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    hmmm we have to start from somewhere, as the world is finite and having limited resources :coffee:
     
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  10. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    double post
     
  11. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Go to- pmindia.nic.in

    click on on: 'Interact with Hon'ble PM'

    Keep posting your views until one reaches there. :tongue1:
     
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  12. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Why Population Matters

    With the world confronting a host of major crises relating to climate, energy, severe poverty, food, the global economy and political instability, why should anyone be concerned about population? The simple answer is that virtually all of the major problems that confront the world today relate in some critical way to population growth.

    While public concern about rapid population growth has subsided in recent decades, world population is still growing at about 80 million people a year. If current trends persist, there will 2.5 billion more people on the planet by mid-century, bringing the total to about 9.2 billion. That projected population growth raises a host of questions about the future of humanity and the planet we inhabit.

    Most importantly, will we be able to feed 9.2 billion people? This year, for the first time in history, over 1 billion people go to bed hungry every day. High food prices and the global economic recession have pushed 100 million more people than last year into chronic hunger and poverty. And, looking ahead, we know that climate change, rising energy prices, and growing water scarcity will make it harder, not easier, to grow the crops necessary to feed an expanding population. Mounting soil erosion and the loss of farm land will also add to the challenge of boosting food production.

    And it's not just food that's potentially in short supply. Water scarcity is a growing concern. In many parts of the world today, major rivers at various times of the year no longer reach the ocean. In some areas, lakes are going dry and underground water aquifers are being rapidly depleted. And climate change, of course, will make the water situation even more critical. Drier areas will be more prone to drought, wetter areas more prone to flooding, and the summer runoff from snowpack and glaciers will diminish:meeting:

    As food, water, and other resources are strained by the escalating demands of a growing world population, the number of environmental refugees in the world will rise…and so will the potential for conflict and civil war.

    Fortunately, for all of us, there is one simple strategy that will help to address all these problems: provide universal access to voluntary family planning and reproductive health services. There are over 100 million women in the world today who want to space or limit their pregnancies, but who lack knowledge of, or access to, modern methods of contraception. By educating and empowering women, and giving them access to family planning services, we can save lives, strengthen families, fight poverty, preserve the environment, and help achieve a world population that can live in harmony with the planet.

    The Population Institute
     
  13. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    World faces overpopulation 'disaster' as number of people is set to rise by 75 million EACH YEAR

    Global population is expected to peak at 9.5bn in 2075

    Annual rise is the equivalent of entire UK population


    [​IMG]

    The world is edging closer to overpopulation Armageddon as swelling cities drain the planet of its vital resources, a report warns today.

    Population growth, especially in newly developing countries, is the 'defining challenge of the 21st century'.

    It represents a greater potential threat than climate change, according to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

    Over the next six decades the world's population is expected to explode, soaring from 6.9billion to peak at 9.5billion in 2075, the report says.

    [​IMG]

    Each year the number of people in the world is due to rise by 75million - equivalent to the entire population of the UK.

    Most of the growth will be in the African continent, which is following in the industrial footsteps of Asia, and in cities.

    The world's urban population is likely to increase from a 2007 figure of 3.3billion to 6.4billion in 2050.

    But without drastic changes there will not be sufficient resources to provide people with basic human needs such as water, food, energy and shelter, says the report, entitled Population: One Planet, Too Many People?

    Climate change is likely to place even more stress on resources, resulting in as many as a billion people moving from inhospitable regions.

    Water requirements are projected to rise by 30 per cent by 2030 while food resources will be stretched by a doubling of demand for agricultural produce by 2050.


    Slum living, already forced on a third of the world's urban populations, will become even more widespread as cities became increasingly packed with people.

    As a result billions could be at risk of hunger, thirst and appalling living conditions, creating tinderbox conditions that could ignite civil unrest and conflict.

    The report, compiled with the help of more than 70 engineers around the world, sets out a series of 'engineering development goals' as a first step towards averting the looming disaster.

    It calls for a global engineering initiative, modelled on the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals, to tackle the key problem areas of energy, water, food, urbanisation and finance.

    Lead author Dr Tim Fox said: 'Towards the end of the century the world is going to come face to face with the challenges of the largest population explosion in human history.

    'These headline figures really are staggering from a resources point of view and for the provision of the basic needs of human society.'

    Engineering solutions such as reducing energy waste, improving food storage and extracting water from underground aquifers would allow the world to sustain a population of 9.5billion, said Dr Fox.

    The cost would run into many trillions of pounds, but would be affordable if richer nations were willing to share financial as well as technological resources.

    A key necessity is to help poorer nations 'leapfrog' the resource-hungry 'dirty' phase of industrialisation.

    As population levels soar in newly emerging industrialised countries, those in developed parts of the world such as the UK and US are likely to stabilise or even fall, said the report.

    The population of Europe is expected to decline by 20 per cent by 2050. However, the impact of global population growth would still be felt around an increasingly connected world where changes in one region could have an impact 'many thousands of miles away'.

    World faces overpopulation 'disaster' as number of people set to rise by 75 million EACH YEAR | Mail Online
     
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  14. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Population growth biggest threat to India’s development

    Rising population is the greatest threat to the sustainable development in India, a policy maker has told a recent summit.

    Rural areas in particular must receive better formal education on environmental issues to improve the quality of stewardship.

    SP Singh, a planning advisor to the state of Uttarakhand said that the failure to manage population in the Gangetic plains of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Jharkhand could lead to the disruption of natural resource management in Himalayan region. :meeting:

    Singh called for improvements in society’s understanding of the economic and environmental impact of ecosystem services.

    He also said a system of accountability was required to prevent the indiscriminate use of natural resources.

    At an international level, Indian politicians are calling for the right to use their resources to pursue development, without externally imposed constraints from the UN.

    The Environmental concerns and sustainable development conference, organised by the Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development (IESD), Banaras Hindu University, also heard a plea for local knowledge to come to the fore.

    “Wisdom emerging from the local community is a better method for sustainable development,” said Professor PS Ramakrishnan, Jawaharlal Nehru University, who pointed to political conflict as the main driver of environmental degradation.

    India is currently facing the “perfect storm” scenario of escalating climate impacts, rapidly growing population and increasing development all putting pressure on food security and ecosystem health.

    Instilling sustainability concepts for developing nations, such as efficient cook stoves and clean lighting can have benefits for human health and the environment.

    The Sundarbans habitat, which spans Indian and Bangladeshi territory is currently under is facing immense environmental pressures and could soon be home to a new coal power station.

    Population growth biggest threat to India's development | RTCC - Responding to Climate Change
     
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  15. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    The Effects of Population Growth on Economic Development
    By Ploni Almoni, eHow Contributor

    Population growth is closely tied to economic development. On the one hand, labor shortages will slow the rate of economic growth in industrialized countries, but on the other hand, a high birthrate in a developing country may stress limited renewable resources.:meeting: Governments in western and other industrialized countries like Japan are challenged to create effective immigration policies and programs to increase the birthrate, while countries with weaker economies pursue public health policies to reduce population growth. Globally, a smaller population presents multiple benefits from an ecological perspective, but some economies are challenged by low birthrates and are redirecting their need for unskilled labor to countries with higher populations and lower wage demands.

    The Effects of Population Growth on Economic Development | eHow.com

     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2014
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