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Population based on “Resource Sufficiency Evaluation” is Crucial

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by santosh, Mar 29, 2014.

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  1. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Total BS! You f*ck at the right moment, you reproduce. Western society knows the consequences of becoming overpopulated. That's why condoms were first invented in west i.e. to control unwanted birth. :lol:
     
  2. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Think they were invented in China.
     
  3. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Oh! is it? I didn't know that. :p
     
  4. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    The History of Condoms

    Around the world, between six and nine billion condoms are used each year. Unfortunately, their use is not universally accepted. Experts agree that condom use can dramatically reduce the number of new HIV and STD infections each year. Even the Catholic religion, who has always strictly forbidden their use, has recently announced they are considering allowing them in very special circumstances. Yet, some leaders within the church make accusations that condoms don't work and should not be used. Just a few months ago, Pope Benedict said that HIV and AIDS should be controlled with abstinence only. Have you ever wondered where condoms came from? Are you curious to know when they were first used and who invented them? This brief history lesson will answer those questions and provide you with some interesting trivia for your next dinner party.
    1000 BC
    As far as anyone can tell, this is roughly when the use of condoms was first recorded in history. Unlike today's latex or polyurethane, the first condoms were made of oiled silk paper, linen sheaths, leather, or very thin hollow horn.

    AD 200
    Cave paintings dating back to the year 200 depict condom use, the earliest known visual evidence of their use.

    1500s
    An Italian doctor by the name of Gabrielle Fallopius (for whom, coincidentally, the female fallopian tube was named) suggested that linen sheath condoms be used to protect against syphilis, a deadly epidemic at that time in history.

    1640s
    Reports say farmers in Condom, France began using sheep guts as condoms, possibly the origin of the lambskin condom.

    1660s
    Allegedly, the name "condom" was coined when Charles II was given oiled sheep intestines to use as condoms by a Dr. Condom. However, some believe the name "condom" came from the Latin word "condus" which means "vessel".

    1855
    Rubber is introduced as a component of condoms. Men are advised that these rubber condoms can be washed and reused until they crumble.

    1912
    The introduction of latex makes condoms cheap and disposable. Thus, the single-use condom is born. By World War II, latex condoms are mass produced and given to troops all over the world.

    1950s
    The latex condom is improved by making them thinner, tighter and lubricated. Also, the reservoir tip is introduced that collects semen in the end, decreasing the risk of leakage and unintentional pregnancy.

    1980s
    Once a source of embarrassment and absolutely forbidden from being advertised in print or on television, the emergence of HIV as a sexually transmitted disease takes condoms into the mainstream. Experts agree that condoms are the best way outside of abstinence to avoid HIV.

    2006
    Condom sales reach nine billion worldwide. Experts have found the spermicides that kill sperm to prevent pregnancy also increase the risk of HIV; they agree that condoms with spermicides should never be used. Also, with the emergence of latex allergies, condoms are now available made of polyurethane for those people with latex allergies.

    The History of Condoms (Centuries of Safer Sex)

    We must commend the United States of America for inventing Google. :tup:
     
  5. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    they are Billionaires not because they have money in pocket. they are "The Industrialists" in form of the industries they run, to provide employment/ generate taxes, developing technologies to change life of common people and hence building the nation this way :india:
     
  6. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    My question was about the tax evasion by big firms and bribery. India has 1\4th of her GDP as black money i.e. 500 billion while 60% of her people are poor. Just think of the employment that amount can generate.:what:
     
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  7. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Why Population Matters

    With the world confronting a host of major crises relating to climate, energy, severe poverty, food, the global economy and political instability, why should anyone be concerned about population? The simple answer is that virtually all of the major problems that confront the world today relate in some critical way to population growth.

    While public concern about rapid population growth has subsided in recent decades, world population is still growing at about 80 million people a year. If current trends persist, there will 2.5 billion more people on the planet by mid-century, bringing the total to about 9.2 billion. That projected population growth raises a host of questions about the future of humanity and the planet we inhabit.

    Most importantly, will we be able to feed 9.2 billion people? This year, for the first time in history, over 1 billion people go to bed hungry every day. High food prices and the global economic recession have pushed 100 million more people than last year into chronic hunger and poverty. And, looking ahead, we know that climate change, rising energy prices, and growing water scarcity will make it harder, not easier, to grow the crops necessary to feed an expanding population. Mounting soil erosion and the loss of farm land will also add to the challenge of boosting food production.

    And it's not just food that's potentially in short supply. Water scarcity is a growing concern. In many parts of the world today, major rivers at various times of the year no longer reach the ocean. In some areas, lakes are going dry and underground water aquifers are being rapidly depleted. And climate change, of course, will make the water situation even more critical. Drier areas will be more prone to drought, wetter areas more prone to flooding, and the summer runoff from snowpack and glaciers will diminish:meeting:

    As food, water, and other resources are strained by the escalating demands of a growing world population, the number of environmental refugees in the world will rise…and so will the potential for conflict and civil war.

    Fortunately, for all of us, there is one simple strategy that will help to address all these problems: provide universal access to voluntary family planning and reproductive health services. There are over 100 million women in the world today who want to space or limit their pregnancies, but who lack knowledge of, or access to, modern methods of contraception. By educating and empowering women, and giving them access to family planning services, we can save lives, strengthen families, fight poverty, preserve the environment, and help achieve a world population that can live in harmony with the planet.

    The Population Institute
     
  8. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    @Averageamerican


    China's one-child policy means many benefits for parents

    Li Tianhao has just given birth to a baby boy blessed with his mother's nose, his father's mouth and an impressive ability to sleep through even the loudest disturbance.

    It is a skill the newborn will be fortunate to maintain as he has been born in Henan, the most crowded province in the world's most populous nation as the human family edged closer to the 7 billion mark.

    Yet he will probably grow up alone. Although Henan last year became the first province in China to register its 100 millionth resident giving it a population bigger than any country in Europe it also claims some of the greatest successes in taming demographic growth through its family planning policies.

    This has not happened by accident. Henan is one of the most environmentally stressed areas of China with a quarter of the water and a fifth of the land per capita compared to the already low national average.

    Senior family planners say this justifies rigid restrictions. "The large number of people has put very big pressure on all resources, especially water," said Liu Shaojie vice director of the Population Commission in Henan. "Over 30 years of effort, we have put in place a systematic procedure for controlling the population. That has eased the impact on the environment. We are doing glorious work." [​IMG]

    Many environmentalists agree that population control is essential if humanity is to move on to a more sustainable track, but how can this be done? China has gone further than any nation in trying to answer this question over the past 30 years. But both the means and the ends remain the subject of fierce controversy.

    When the one-child policy started in the 1970s, Liu says, women in Henan gave birth to an average of 5.8 children in their lifetimes. Their counterparts today have less than 1.7. The change, he said, means 30 million fewer births – equivalent to preventing one every 30 seconds for three decades. And that is just in Henan. Across all of China, the government claims there would be more than 300 million more children without the family planning policy.

    This policy was initiated primarily for economic and education reasons, but it is increasingly cited as an environmental blessing. According to Liu, the population controls have kept sulphur dioxide emissions down by 17.6% and the main source of water pollution by 30.8%. Without it, he says, the average person in Henan would have a third less land and a quarter less forest. It has also, he claims, prevented between 137m and 200m tonnes of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere. :cheers:

    Such extrapolations are questionable. The current measures were not put in place to save the global environment, but to redress one of the biggest errors made by Mao Zedong. The founder of the People's Republic was advised in the 1950s that China's population was growing dangerously fast, but he urged women to have more babies because, as he put it, they were like aircraft carriers launching fighter planes. Today, Chinese officials and scholars privately describe this as Mao's greatest mistake. If he had put in place a two-child policy in the fifties, today's one-child policy would not be necessary.

    The description of the system as a "one-child policy" is misleading. Most married women in China have the chance to bear two offspring, but the entitlement to breed beyond a solitary child is determined by a complex set of rules that vary from province to province and are often applied differently from village to village.

    Broadly speaking, urban couples are allowed one child, rural families can try for a second if the first is a girl and women from ethnic minorities are permitted to give birth two or three times in their lifetime. But there are close to a dozen exceptions, including if a baby has disabilities or if the mother and father are both single children. Communist cadres and government officials can be fired for procreational transgressions because they are supposed to set an example. By contrast, Tibetans have the fewest restrictions.

    Money is another key factor. The rich in Shanghai and Beijing can easily afford the penalties for a second or third child. The poor in Gansu and Yunnan, by contrast are at risk of having their meagre property confiscated if they fail to remain within birthing quotas.

    For family planners like Liu, these injustices and disturbances are seen not as failures, but as aberrations that call for policy tweaks. Countless adjustments over the past 30 years have created a mind-bogglingly complex system that touches on everything from contraception and sterilisation to pensions and tax incentives. In Henan alone, Liu says the family planning policy employs 17,000 administrators and 22,000 nursing and technical staff. In addition, support organisations claim a combined membership of 9,600,000 volunteers, who engage in work as diverse as spreading propaganda to monitoring menstruation cycles- something that is still common in villages though rare in cities.

    The state has gone to remarkable lengths to try to fill the gaps left by the missing children. Rule-abiding parents can get a monthly stipend, extra pension benefits when they are older, preferential hospital treatment, first choice for government jobs, extra land allowances and, in some case, free homes and a tonne of free water a month. Their children are even given bonus points in middle school entrance exams.

    The system is incredibly expensive. The provincial government sets aside 40 yuan per person for the policy, which adds up to 4bn yuan (£400m) or about four percent of its budget, but this is just a small fraction of the total amount paid by central and village authorities.

    Enforcement requires a huge and powerful bureaucracy. "Henan has much to teach the world in family planning, but it is a hard lesson to learn. Officials from Africa and India come to study what we are doing in China, but I'm not sure that they can apply it the same way," said Liu. "That's because they don't have a Communist party so it is difficult for them to take such strong steps."

    In theory, the only penalties are hefty fines - in Henan's case, three times the annual net income of the couple who have violated the rules. But the system still relies on a high degree of intrusiveness and communal pressure to achieve targets.

    Others argue that the impact of family planning is overblown and simply accelerated what would have happened anyway as a result of improvements in infant mortality, greater participation by women in the workforce and greater availability of contraception.

    As China becomes richer and better educated, women in rich cities like Shanghai and Beijing are opting for few children just like their counterparts in wealthy nations. And with the nation's population is forecast to peak around 2030 many say the family planning policy had outlived its usefulness.

    "Everybody agrees change is necessary. But the debate is about how to start and when", said Zheng Zhenzhen, a population specialist at the Chinese Academy of Social Science.

    "We debate the relationship between the size of the population and resource consumption. But it is not a fixed formula. It depends on how you utilise your resource. We waste and pollute. I think those problems – behaviour – are more important than the size of the population."

    In Henan, however, the message that you can consume more if you breed less appears to be more persuasive than threats and penalties.

    At the Hui hospital, the new father Li Yongli says he would rather have a first car than a second child. The shift towards fewer legs and more wheels in his family is part of a carefully worked out plan. The final goal is to ensure a better life and education for his son, who was of course, born exactly to schedule.

    "It's all part of the program," said the beaming father.

    Additional reporting by Cecily Huang

    China's one-child policy means many benefits for parents
     
  9. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    @Zeus_@21
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    and there is a difference between Islam and other religions. check, you will find more than half of the Muslim population below age 20. even if you go to Britain/UK, you will find the same result...... :coffee:

    over 500 Million+ Muslims are based in South Asia itself. even about India, population of Hindus was well over 88% at the time of freedom, in 1947, while its well below 80% at present...... while about Pakistan, minorities are almost gone, Shia-Sunni-Ahmadies problem there we find now. while state of minorities in Bangladesh is also being discussed in the thread as below :facepalm:

    Illegal immigration from Bangladesh has turned Assam explosive | Indian Defence Forum


    @rocky.idf
    @Picdelamirand-oil

    Rocky, do you like China? yes or no
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2014
  10. rocky.idf

    rocky.idf BANNED BANNED

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  11. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Increasing Muslim Population to Fulfill Religious Goals in World

    hmmmmm, its widely believed that that the countries like Pakistan+Bangladesh are increasing population to fulfill their Islamic Fanaticism interests only.

    Population of Pakistan was 34mil in 1947 while that of Bangladesh was around 36mil at the time of freedom in 1947, while now its over 180million+ in Pakistan and over 160million+ in Bangladesh. and all the population increase in these countries is mainly intended to export Islamic Jihad in other countries......

    and here we always give example of India, where population of Hindus reduced from 88% in 1947 to less than 80% at present, while that of Muslims increased from 8% to 16%+ to total India's population since 1947 to date.......while about Pakistan, minorities are almost gone, Shia-Sunni-Ahmadies problem there we find now. while state of minorities in Bangladesh is also being discussed in the thread as below :facepalm:

    Illegal immigration from Bangladesh has turned Assam explosive | Indian Defence Forum

    and when we want to discuss "One Child Policy" of China, then it tells us the story of that country which wants to build itself, but doesn't want others to get problem from Chinese people. "Having only as much population as it may be fed by the limited resources, the China has." the topic of this thread. :tup:

    while that of Muslim population is mainly meant to export Islamic fanaticism to other countries, the reason even if population of Bangladesh is more than the largest country of world, Russia, Bangladesh even import a third of the food for its population also, they don't want to stop population growth, for the purpose to achieve their religious goals. even if Bangladesh falls among the Least Developed Countries, having enough support from rest of the world too this way....

    and if you want to build your own country, you may do anything within, good or bad, but if you are increasing Muslim population just to create problems for the non-Islamic states of world, we have a reason to ask, "WHY?"

    what exactly these highly populated Muslim countries are intended in this world, we do have a reason to get to know :tup:

    for example, population of Australia is less than 25million, while its a quite big country with hefty resources. and here, they do have a reason to ask, what others are doing in this world? would Christian states also increase Christian population to have competition with others, or, others would learn something in this regard? :what:
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2014
  12. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    =>
    .
    Muslim population 'rising 10 times faster than rest of society'

    Muslim Population 'rising 10 Times Faster Than Rest Of Society- Times Online - Islam for Muslims - Nairaland

    The Muslim population in Britain has grown by more than 500,000 to 2.4 million in just four years, according to official research collated for The Times.

    The population multiplied 10 times faster than the rest of society, the research by the Office for National Statistics reveals. In the same period the number of Christians in the country fell by more than 2 million.


    Ethnic Cleansing: White British Driven Out of Cities | The New Observer :facepalm:

     
  13. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    One Child Norm in India: Is it Possible?


    Rising population has been much of a concern for our nation in past few decades. To counter the drastic increase we have till now resorted to steps like providing free Family Health Planning facilities for married couples (you know the common ones I am talking about) and launching less-given-heed-to campaigns of Hum Do Hamare Do which lately has become Hum do Hamara Ek, thinking that the country which is having the largest illiterate population in the world would give heed to such campaigns. The situation demands stricter government interference to combat the exploding population.

    A One Child Norm, similar to what Chinese have done, is one of the possible solutions at hand. Implementing such a policy in a country like ours is not so easy. With likely protests from political parties, ethnic groups, religious bodies and other idle social organizations getting yet another issue to raise their voices against, implementing this would not be an easy task.

    Let’s go deep into the problem of rising population and the ‘One Child Norm’ solution.


    Why is One Child Norm (OCN) important?

    ■ ■Bursting population of our nation. Increasing poverty, unemployment, social, economic, and environmental problems day by day.

    ■With a definite check on population growth, such a norm will help us in providing quality health care facilities and increasing our literacy rate as population has a cascading effect on these issues.

    ■Limited availability of resources. 40% of the people live below poverty line and cannot easily afford meal two times a day.

    ■Such a norm may promote adoption of orphans thereby reducing number of orphans in India which currently tops the list.

    ■Indian Medical Association (IMA) has been reiterating its suggestion to implement OCN based on their survey.


    Associated Hurdles and Drawbacks of Norm

    ■ ■ONC or TCN? Should it be a One Child Norm or Two Child Norm? If we go for two child norm, should there be a birth spacing as it is there in Chinese one child norm policy? (In China, a second child is allowed with 3-4 years spacing between the birth of two children but only if the first child is a female)

    ■Rural and Urban Factor: If implemented, should it be both in rural and urban areas or either of them? India has around 70% of rural population and rest urban or semi-urban. China too has majority of rural population but it has implemented policy only for families living in urban areas.

    ■Increased Abortions: This norm may lead to increase in female foeticide (few
    states already have sex ratio below 900 females/1000 males).

    ■Political hurdles: Unanimous decision on this issue is tough to be made amongst the parties and the bill implementing this norm may not be passed easily.

    ■Effect on population and economic growth: Considering the fact that India is a labour intensive nation, known for cheap labour, such a restriction in the long run may result in a shortage of labour and can affect economic growth of nation.

    ■Improved Family Health Planning: To practically bring such a norm into existence, more awareness for contraceptives would need to be created when India is already struggling to do it.

    ■Controversial nature of policy: The government may have to come up with separate norms for minorities who are more likely to protest such a norm.

    ■Fine and depriving individuals of other Govt. benefits: The fine to be imposed on breaking such a norm is again a big issue. Where per capita income of Indians is approximately Rs 48000, the fine for bringing a new life into existence is tough to decide. It can be similar to our tax slab depending on the financial condition of an individual.

    ■Sudden Decline in Population: India already has a declining population growth rate since 1980s (1.34% in 2008[1]) and also a lower life expectancy (around 69 years [avg. of male and female]). Given this fact, our Health Ministry through Population Foundation of India will need to justify that OCN will be a success and it will not lead to sudden decrease in population in coming years.

    ■The danger of extinction of family name in case of premature deaths of the only child in families following OCN.

    ■Other Complications: Policy for NRIs would be an issue.


    Solution to the problem

    ■ ■A National Survey amongst all adults is required to be done in a transparent manner since it concerns all citizens and would help in a consensus on this issue.

    ■Initially a one child norm to bring a sooner decrease and when population is stabilised we can switch to two child norm.

    ■Policy to be revised (if required) in each Five Year Plan and should not be a permanent one. If we face any adverse problems it can be withdrawn, but giving it a start is very important and a need of the hour.

    ■Implement it only in urban areas for first few five year plans and judge its demographic effect.

    ■Relaxation in the norm (as in China): If there are no siblings of a married couple then the couple can have two children.

    To conclude, we can say that One Child Norm seems to be a necessity but its implementation in India requires careful juxtaposition of facts and figures in hand.

    Family planning- One Child Norm in India: Is it Possible?
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2014
  14. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Want to have a real impact on climate change? Then become a vegetarian

    Millennials who care about the environment should put their money where their mouths are and stop eating meat

    [​IMG]
    These cows don’t know that they’re destroying the environment. But they’re cows. What’s your excuse? Photograph: Alamy

    Between widespread economic disparities, population growth, unsustainable agriculture and climate change, a study partially funded by Nasa predicted that civilization as we know it could be steadily heading for a collapse within the next century – and the window to create impactful change is narrowing. That means millennials are potentially the last generation during which creating meaningful change is possible. But how do we accomplish this?

    It’s time to start a dietary revolution.

    Millennials represent $200bn in economic worth, and if a statistical majority of our generation become vegetarians or vegans, or at least eat significantly less meat than previous generations, we have a chance to have a real economic – and thus environmental – impact.

    In 2012, there were roughly 70bn animals raised as livestock for 7.1bn people. And a study published in July by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that livestock production is among the most destructive forces driving climate change: it degrades air quality, pollutes waterways, and is the single-largest use of land. :facepalm:

    Precisely how much livestock contributes to climate change remains up for debate: studies show numbers ranging from 18% (a 2006 UN food report) to 51% (a 2009 World Watch study). Most other studies fall somewhere in that range but, in each of them, the advice is the same: humans need to eat less meat to curb climate change and resource scarcity.

    Raising animals to eat produces more greenhouse gasses (via methane and nitrous oxide) than all of the carbon dioxide excreted by automobiles, boats, planes and trains in the world combined. Over a 20-year period, methane has 86 times more climate change potential than carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide has 268 times more climate change potential, according to the 2006 UN report. Radically reducing the amount of methane and nitrous oxide in the atmosphere can produce discernable changes in the greenhouse gas effect within decades, while the same reductions in carbon dioxide take nearly a century. :facepalm:

    Yes, quitting meat can reduce your carbon footprint significantly more than quitting driving.

    Besides the methane and nitrous oxide released during livestock production, industrialized livestock contributes to roughly 75% of deforestation (to give animals grazing grounds and grow soybeans used in feedstock).

    Raising cows, of course, has the biggest environmental impact. There are roughly 1.5bn cows raised as livestock, and they consume 45bn gallons of water and 135bn pounds of food every day, according to the documentary Cowspiracy. Comparatively, 7.1bn humans consume roughly 5.2bn gallons of water and 21bn pounds of food daily. To put this in digestible terms, producing the meat for a one-third pound hamburger patty as much as 18,000 gallons of water depending on the farming method, according to the US government.:tsk:

    In comparison to chickens and pigs, cows require 28 times more land, 11 times more water and cause five times more greenhouse gasses, according to a study led by Gidon Eshel of Bard College. Looking at foods commonly found in vegetarian and vegan diets, like potatoes, rice and wheat, his report finds that, per calorie of beef, cows require 160 times more land and produce 11 times more greenhouse gases.

    The resources needed – and sacrificed – to raise livestock is ridiculous; we simply need to stop breeding so many animals for slaughter. You can take all kinds of other small steps to reduce your environmental footprint: commuting to work by biking or walking, monitoring electricity usage by installing energy-efficient appliances, using less water via low-flow faucets and toilets, buying from environmentally-conscious companies - but researchers argue that none of that on its own will be enough to reverse climate change. If you really want to make a difference, then look at what’s on your plate. :coffee:

    As Albert Einstein said, “Nothing will benefit human health and increase the chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet.” If you’re not willing to go vegetarian or vegan, even just significantly reducing the amount of meat in your diet can have an impact: for instance, instead of adhering to “meatless Mondays”, make it “meaty Mondays”, when Monday is the only day that you eat even a small portion of meat.

    Putting this off for another generation – the way our parents have – just isn’t feasible. Millennials have the opportunity to use our economic power and personal choices to effect real change, and it’s our responsibility to do so.

    Besides, if we don’t stop and reverse climate change, all we’ll have left to eat – if we’re lucky – is fish. Whoops – looks like we’re running out of fish, too.

    Want to have a real impact on climate change? Time to become a vegetarian | Travis McKnight | Comment is free | theguardian.com
     
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  15. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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