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Russia to Showcase T-90S Tank at Arms Show in Peru

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by Manmohan Yadav, May 19, 2013.

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  1. kaku

    kaku BANNED BANNED

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    Man, this is a pathetic reason. Even the Abraham also has lots of classified info, but they are still selling it.

    Or for sale we can even downgrade the Kanchan Armour.
     
  2. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    but we don't know to downgrade this... we had been making things for our own consumptions so.. there had been no concept for this downgraded export things... first we need to be able to stand on our feet then only we can sell to others.
     
  3. Criminal

    Criminal FULL MEMBER

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    Or develop a new Armour composition suited for exports :meeting:
     
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    India Reverses Gear, Puts Arjun Tank Back in Production
    Jan 28, 2013 12:16 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff

    Latest updates [?]: Article updates; What's in Arjun Mk.2?; What's beyond Arjun?


    Arjun tank
    (click to view full)

    India’s indigenous Arjun tank project began in 1974, and originally aimed to replace the Russian T-54 and T-72 tanks which made up the bulk of that country’s armored firepower. As has often been the case in India, its DRDO government weapons development agency sought an entirely made in India solution, even though this would require major advances on a number of fronts for Indian industry. As has often been the case in India, the result was a long and checkered history filled with development delays, performance issues, mid-project specifications changes by India’s military, and the eventual purchase of both foreign substitutions within the project (now 58% of the tank’s cost) and foreign competitors from outside it (the T-90S).

    The 58.5 tonne Arjun tank wasn’t fielded with the Indian Army until May 2009. In contrast, Pakistan’s much more time-limited, scope-limited, and budget conscious approach in developing and successfully fielding its T-80UD “Al-Khalid†tank is often cited by Arjun’s detractors.

    The Russian T-90S will form the mainstay of India’s future force, despite that tank’s performance issues in hot weather . That won’t change, but after beating the T-90 in a number of trials, the Arjun now has a clear future in India…



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    Arjun Cap, and T-90S Trade


    T-90, backside ollie
    (click to view full)

    The Arjun is an indigenous project, but not wholly so. Imported items such as the engine/ power pack, gunner’s main sight, and other components account for 58% of each tank’s cost. This is not uncommon around the world. Israel’s Merkava tank family also relies on a foreign-built engine, for instance, as does France’s Leclerc.
    It is uncommon among Indian policy-makers, but the reality is that a series of project failures gave them little choice. The Arjun has been plagued with a mix of problems over its 36-year development history, including its fire control system, suspension issues, and poor mobility due to excessive weight. It has also grown from a 40-tonne tank with a 105mm gun, to a 62-67 tonne tank with a 120mm gun. Predictably, project costs spiraled up from Rs 15.5 crore in 1974 to Rs 306 crore (INR 3.06 trillion). The army was not pleased. In an unusual stance, they accepted the tank only after a third-party audit by an international tank manufacturer, and orders were strictly limited.

    The Indian army didn’t even stand up its 1st Arjun armored regiment until May 2009, 35 years after the program began. To underscore the point, even that milestone followed a development that seemed to end the platform’s future. In July 2008, India had announced that production of the Arjun would be capped at the already-committed total of 124 vehicles. Instead, development would begin on a new next-generation tank, designed to survive and serve until 2040 or so.

    That appeared to close the book on a failed project, but opinion in India was sharply split. Many observers cited this as the final failure. Other were noting the problems with the T-90s, and the Army’s refusal to conduct side-by-side tests, alongside recent test successes that began earning the Arun some military fans. In May 2010 desert trials alongside the T-90S, the Arjun did surprisingly well.

    In response, the government and the Army changed course somewhat. Arjun production would double to 248. That’s an improvement, but DRDO insists that a 500 vehicle order is needed to give them the volume needed to iron out all production difficulties, and provide a platform for future development.

    The Army’s plan still calls for 1,657 T-90S “Bhishma†tanks at about 12 crore (INR 120 million, about $2.78 million) each if prices remain stable. About 1,000 of those are slated to be built in India by Avadi Heavy Industries, the same firm that builds the Arjuns. They will be joined by just 248 Arjuns at about 16.8 crore (INR 168 million, about $3.92 million) each, as well as 692 older T-72 tanks upgraded to the T-72M1 “Ajeya†standard . This overall plan changes the force structure proposed in 2006, from 3,780 tanks (1,302 T-90s and 2,480 T-72s) to 2,597 higher-end tanks.

    India Reverses Gear, Puts Arjun Tank Back in Production
     
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