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Russian air force news

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by MiG-23MLD, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The Tu-160 can carry cruise missiles with a stand-off range of 3500-5000km. The B-2 only drops free-fall munitions - high-tech bomber, low-tech weapons.
     
  2. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    26 MAY 2015
    Production of the Elbrus-8S microprocessor will begin in 2016
    The head of UIMC announced the final stage of development
    [​IMG]


    United Instrument Manufacturing Corporation (UIMC), which is part of Rostec Corporation, announced the final stage of development for Russia's new generation of microprocessor, the 8-core Elbrus-8S. As noted by UIMC CEO Alexander Yakunin at the conference “IT in Service of the Military-Industrial Complex," mass production of the chip is expected to begin in 2016.

    According to the head of UIMC, the primary task of the Russian electronics industry is to substitute key imported equipment with domestic versions.

    “The functionality of equipment, its proper operation, and protection from external interference and threats is directly dependent on this task,” said Alexander Yakunin.

    The primary task of the Russian electronics industry is to substitute key imported equipment with domestic versions

    ALEXANDER YAKUNIN, CEO OF UIMC

    Breakthroughs have been achieved in this task through the Baikal project, which UIMC is carrying out in cooperation with the company T-Platforms. Just recently the first engineering model of the Baikal-T processor was released with a 28 nm process technology, a revolutionary achievement for Russia. The next Russian development will be a new generation of Elbrus processors, using the same modern processing technology.

    "The creation of the processor has entered the final stage, as after the engineering release the processor is now undergoing testing. Our Institute of Electronic Control Machines named for I. S. Bruk (INEUM) is conducting this work along with MCST. At the end of this year, a processor should undergo state tests, and in 2016 serial production is planned to begin,” said the CEO of UIMC.

    The architecture, circuit design, and topology of the Elbrus-8S microprocessor were entirely developed by specialists from INEUM and MCST. The eight-microprocessor chip has a speed of 1.3 GHz and performance capabilities measuring 250 gigaflops. For comparison, the previous generation of microprocessor, the 4-core Elbrus-4S had 65 nm with only 50 gigaflops (five times less) and a speed of 800 MHz.

    Along with the new Elbrus-8S processor, a new peripheral interface controller, the KPI-2 chip, is also scheduled for release. It will allow the Elbrus-8S system to exchange information with external devices at a modern level of speed. The device utilizes the 20-line PCI-Express 2.0 system, 3-controller Gigabit Ethernet, and 8 ports of SATA 3.0.

    The fact that Russia now has its own chips with 28-nm processing technology is a huge step forward in terms of establishing fully secure computing solutions

    ALEXANDER YAKUNIN, CEO OF UIMC

    "The use of technology with key foreign components poses an enormous threat to the country's critical areas of management and production, first of all in terms of data protection and preventing the influence of foreign equipment,” said Alexander Yakunin. “The fact that Russia now has its own chips with 28-nm processing technology is a huge step forward in terms of developing Russian technology and the possibility of establishing fully secure computing and telecommunications equipment.”

    Development in this field is gaining momentum. By the end of this year or the beginning of next year, T-Platforms should finish its work on the new Baikal-M processor, and plans are in place to introduce in 2018 the next generation of Elbrus, the 8-core Elbrus-16S, which will have 28 nm, a processing speed of 1.5 GHz, and a capacity of over 512 gigaflops, explained the CEO of UIMC.

    It may be recalled that, within Rostec Corporation, UIMC has been named the head company responsible for the development of computers, telecommunications equipment, and related software for the civilian market.

    Currently, UIMC is introducing to the market the first models of import-substitution communications equipment, namely IP-PBX systems, routers, and carrier-class switches. In the future, most of the equipment manufactured by UIMC will be based on a new generation of Russian microprocessors.

    The fourth “IT in Service of the Military-Industrial Complex” conference is taking place in Tatarstan from May 26-29 and is organized by Rostec Corporation, the Government of the Republic of Tatarstan, and the Military-Industrial Commission. This year, more than 800 representatives of various law enforcement agencies, the largest military-industrial holding companies, and Russian and foreign IT companies are taking place in the conference.
    Rostec :: News :: Production of the Elbrus-8S microprocessor will begin in 2016
     
  3. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    20 MAY 2015
    Russian Helicopters to showcase new commercial models
    HeliRussia is a key event for Russian and global helicopter manufacturers
    [​IMG]


    Russian Helicopters (part of State Corporation Rostec) will highlight a line-up of new commercial helicopters including the light Ka-226T and Ansat and medium Mi-171A2 and Mi-38 at HeliRussia 2015, one of the key events in the industry calendar, which runs from 21-23 May at Moscow Crocus Expo centre. The company will take part in round tables and conferences, and will hold a number of meetings and presentations for partners.

    “Russian Helicopters has always been an active participant in HeliRussia, where it showcases advanced technology,” Russian Helicopters CEO Alexander Mikheev said. “By creating new helicopters we can expand our model range and compete more successfully on the global market. Today’s helicopter manufacturers are also competing to provide the best aftersales service and this is a key area of focus for us that we plan to highlight at HeliRussia.”

    Sector experts expect particular interest in the light multirole Ka-226T and Ansat. The Ka-226T boasts high-precision hovering ability, outstanding manoeuvrability and handling, as well as a high power rating, maximum safety and ease of use.

    The light multirole Ansat will be presented with a medical module. The helicopter has high potential for use in medical aviation, as it can be used to transport injured and sick people to hospitals, or to provide on-board medical attention or resuscitate patients. The medical module includes an artificial breathing apparatus, monitoring and defibrillation system, an aspirator, vacuum mattress and many other features that will help save lives.

    Deliveries of the Ansat are scheduled to start in the nearest time. Experts say that the Ansat has a number of competitive edges over other helicopters in its class. The helicopter has a spacious cabin, is reliable and easy to fly, and can be stored outdoors.

    Medium helicopters will be represented by the Mi-171A2 and Mi-38. The Mi-171A2 is one of the most eagerly anticipated new Russian helicopters, and is the latest addition to the Mi-8/17 series, with significant changes to the aircraft’s construction and on-board equipment that improve flight capabilities and reduce operating costs. Russian Helicopters is currently testing the new helicopter using the Mi-171LL (“flying laboratory”) and first prototype of the Mi-171A2.

    Sector experts say that the Mi-38’s cargo-carrying ability and cabin volume, combined with its high speed and comfort, are likely to create high levels of demand from regional operators, primarily for passenger and cargo flights. Low noise levels, a spacious passenger cabin and next-generation flight safety standards are all qualities that suit the helicopter to a wide range of uses. Flight tests are currently ongoing with a number of prototypes. Kazan Helicopters, a Russian Helicopters’ company, has already started assembling the first serial-production Mi-38.

    At HeliRussia 2015, Russian Helicopters will also present its aftersales service programme to military helicopter operators. The programme has been taken to a new level with the granting of a licence from the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation to provide aftersales service for military aircraft sold abroad.

    HeliRussia is a key event for Russian and global helicopter manufacturers. At HeliRussia 2015 market participants will brief the industry on their latest products and future plans. The event has been held since 2008. Russian Helicopters has participated every year, and is the title sponsor of HeliRussia 2015.
    Rostec :: News :: Russian Helicopters to showcase new commercial models
     
    Sree likes this.
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  6. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    pure bitterness, Russia is only few years away from what the US has, less than a decade, basically they are independent:azn: so you get your envy:taz:, Russia Rules:cheers:
     
  7. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    MOSCOW — Russia’s deputy prime minister in charge of defense is many things, but lazy isn’t one of them.
    Dimitry Rogozin has been jumping from city to city — holding conferences about the construction of new warships and delivering grandiose critiques of the leaders of the Russian space program. Everywhere he goes, he delivers electrifying speeches, explaining that the world is a jungle full of enemies who want to steal Russia’s natural resources.
    “If we don’t manage to modernize our country, then Russia will become the world’s loot,” he says. It sounds a lot like Stalin’s 1931 speeches. Rogozin’s solution also sounds pretty Bolshevik: he thinks Russia is too far behind in many domains to catch up to the West, but that Russia should concentrate on developing weapons that would allow it to hold its own.

    The problem is that Rogozin’s energy doesn’t make up for the sad state of Russia’s defense industry. Domestic missiles stubbornly fly off course. The defense minister just called off tests of an underwater missile carrier after yet another unsuccessful launch of an intercontinental missile, which had apparently already been set off during an explosion at the factory. The whole series of missiles had to be sent back to the factory for inspection.


    Read the full article: The Sorry State Of Russia's Defense Industry
    Worldcrunch - top stories from the world's best news sources

    Perhaps the Russian defense minister knows more about Russian defense then you.
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    MOSCOW - "Our military can now match the West!" There is no shortage of pride from Sergei Skorniakov, deputy commander of the Yaroslav Moudry, the crown jewel of the Russian navy's Baltic fleet.
    The battleship has been presented as a symbol of the "Renaissance" of the fleet, moored in a naval base in Kaliningrad, the Russian enclave tucked between Poland and Lithuania, where the Kremlin is threatening to deploy its Iskander close-range missiles and S-400 anti-aircraft missiles. The majority of the men are now volunteers rather than conscripts; both the control crew and the sailors on deck have seen their salaries double. Aboard the ship everyone repeats that they finally feel respected after the military reforms of Vladimir Putin, the past and current occupant of the Kremlin.
    But the Yaroslav Moudry also illustrates the limits of Russia's military modernization. The 4,500 ton heavily armed vessel, which came out of the shipyard in 2008, is based on a model from the time of the USSR -- the control room is still decorated with red stars, symbols of the Soviet regime. Computers are rare here, and the communication equipment seems to have come from a nautical museum.
    "Modernization is happening. We are gradually equipping ourselves with new weapons," responds Vice-Admiral Viktor Tchirkov, the general commander of the Baltic fleet.


    Read the full article: Inside Putin's Ambitious Push To Modernize The Russian Military
    Worldcrunch - top stories from the world's best news sources
     
  9. positron

    positron Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Why China’s Air Force Needs Russia’s SU-35 | The Diplomat
    Why China’s Air Force Needs Russia's SU-35

    By Jesse Sloman and Lauren Dickey
    June 01, 2015

    Last April, Chinese airplane manufacturer Shenyang Aircraft Corporation surprised military observers by test flying its new J-11D fighter jet, an upgraded version of the J-11, China’s indigenous copy of the Russian Su-27. The D-model J-11 is believed to include such advanced features as an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, a relocated infrared search and track (IRST) system, and the expanded use of composite materials to reduce the plane’s weight and radar signature. This first flight indicates that the J-11D is further along in its development cycle than many experts predicted and is poised to provide a new and deadly addition to the growing fighter fleet of the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF).

    Despite the evident maturity of the J-11D program, the Chinese military nevertheless appears to also be going ahead with plans to purchase Russian Su-35 Flankers. The Su-35 is far more maneuverable than the J-11 – which gives the Russian jet an advantage in short-range dogfights – can fly longer distances, and can take off and land with a larger payload. It is also equipped with new avionics and new cockpit displays. However, its radar is a less advanced passive electronically scanned array (PESA) than the AESA system on the J-11D. Moreover, the aircraft and its systems will be manufactured abroad. The Chinese government views its indigenous defense industry as a strategic asset; purchasing more planes from Russia will not help advance Beijing’s goal of developing a mature, self-reliant aerospace industry. Given the apparent redundancy of moving forward with two very similar aircraft programs, some analysts speculate that the PLAAF’s primary motivation for buying the Su-35 may not be for its value as a weapons system but rather because it is equipped with advanced AL-117S turbofans.

    Engines are a critically important component of any fighter aircraft, and they present Chinese airplane manufacturers with a dilemma. Their new fifth-generation fighter prototypes, the Chengdu J-20 and Shenyang J-31, sport sophisticated airframes and avionics that are clearly intended to make them a match for the United States’ most advanced aircraft. However, China’s ability to manufacture jet engines has not kept pace with other sectors of its aerospace industry. Regardless of how capable other Chinese aircraft systems may be, without a reliable, high-performance turbofan engine to power them, both the J-20 and the J-31 will be crippled.
    ......... to be continued
     
  10. positron

    positron Captain FULL MEMBER

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    ..... contd

    History is replete with examples of otherwise excellent jets that struggled because they were underpowered. Although the iconic P-51 Mustang is now best remembered for its sterling service escorting strategic bombers on missions over Germany, it was only after engineers replaced its original Allison engine with the much more powerful British Merlin that it could fly and fight at the altitudes necessary to keep station with the bombers it was protecting. Early models of the now-legendary F-14 Tomcat were equipped with turbofans so weak that Secretary of the Navy John Lehman blamed them for nearly 30 percent of all Tomcat crashes and described them as being “just…terrible.” The F-15 Eagle and F-22 Raptor both struggled through long, painful development programs before their massive engines finally matured and turned them into the highly maneuverable dog fighters that they are today.

    The Chinese military has traditionally relied on Russian engines to power its jets. Unfortunately for the PLAAF, the foreign models it is currently using are no longer cutting edge. The designs of these fighter engines date back more than 30 years and they were intended to be used in aircraft that are much lighter than the new models being tested today. For the time being, prototypes of both the J-20 and the J-31 are flying with older Russian turbofans – the J-20 with the Saturn AL-31 and the J-31 with the Klimov RD-93. Analysts have speculated that both of these aircraft are facing performance limitations imposed by their vintage power plants. For example, the J-20’s current reliance on AL-31s may be preventing the aircraft from achieving supercruise, one of the key performance characteristics that makes the U.S. F-22 such a capable fighter.

    China’s airplane manufacturers have two options for acquiring more advanced engines: Buy them from the Russians or build them at home. Beijing’s clear preference is for the latter; engines have become a focal point of the PRC’s aerospace industry. One Russian commentator described domestic engine development as being as strategically important for the Chinese as the Apollo space program was for the United States during the 1960s. However, jet engines are notoriously difficult to develop, and pose unique design challenges due to the extreme forces they encounter during flight and the exotic materials and techniques used in their construction. In 2012, Andrew Erickson and Gabe Collins argued that engine manufacturing remained a “persistent Achilles heel” of the Chinese aircraft industry and one that lagged behind rapid progress in other aerospace sectors, such as airframe design and sensors.

    Today, the most advanced Chinese-made military turbofan in operational use is the Aviation Industry Corporation of China (Avic) WS-10. The WS-10 provides power for many Chinese aircraft, including some of the PLAAF’s J-11 fleet and the new J-16 multirole fighter. Reports on its capabilities are mixed at best. Although many of the engine’s initial teething problems have apparently been overcome, Jane’s reported last September that the WS-10 still suffers from so many faults that the “number [of engines] sent back to the…plant exceeds the amount of new production units.” Some Chinese commentators have also speculated that the WS-10 lacks sufficient power for the J-16, which is heavier than other Chinese Su-27 variants, and will need to be upgraded to allow the new plane to meet its design potential.

    Another clue pointing to potential problems with the WS-10 is the decision by the PLAAF to use the AL-31 to power the newest variant of the J-10 attack fighter, the J-10B. Although a prototype J-10B equipped with a WS-10 was seen flying as far back as 2011, the PLAAF has nevertheless decided to go forward with the AL-31 for the production version instead. This decision may indicate that the Chinese military is concerned about the WS-10’s capabilities and is opting for a tried-and-true Russian alternative.

    Regardless of the WS-10’s current capabilities, the fifth generation J-20 and J-31 will need much more powerful and reliable engines if they are to maximize their performance. An upgraded WS-10 is one option for the J-20, but it would almost certainly still leave the aircraft underpowered for its size and weight. Two entirely new Chinese engines are currently in development: the Xian WS-15 for the J-20 and the Avic WS-13 for the J-31. The progress of the WS-15 is unknown and it is not being flown on J-20 prototypes, although one Chinese blogger recently suggested that positive test results may indicate an unexpected leap in progress for the engine. The WS-13 was displayed at the Zhuhai air show last November along with another afterburning turbofan, but according to Bill Sweetman “the identical engines were on show two years ago,” and the “the [WS-13’s] development pace so far contrasts sharply with the rate at which new missiles and radar systems are being produced.”

    The questionable progress of both the WS-13 and WS-15 programs may help to explain China’s interest in the Su-35, the latest and most advanced variant of Russia’s venerable Flanker aircraft family. The Su-35 is powered by the AL-117S, a significantly improved version of the AL-31 also sometimes designated the AL-41.

    With its domestic programs seemingly in limbo, some analysts have argued that an AL-117S purchase would be the fastest way for the Chinese to get their hands on a suitable turbofan for the J-20. Since Russia is reportedly unwilling to sell the new engine as a standalone product, the PLAAF will have to buy the Su-35 and acquire the AL-117S as a part of a complete weapons system. After a series of false starts, it seems that a deal for 24 Su-35s is now in its final stages and Chinese pilots have already begun training on the new aircraft in anticipation of the first delivery in 2016.

    In the long-run, it would be foolish to bet against the Chinese aerospace industry ultimately achieving the capacity to develop competitive high-performance jet engines. In the near term, however, the AL-117S remains China’s best option for powering the J-20. Although resorting to Russian technology may not be the ideal solution from an indigenous manufacturing standpoint, lessons learned from the AL-117S will undoubtedly be incorporated into the WS-13 and WS-15. That may benefit the J-31, which will be stuck with older WS-10s or RD-93s until the WS-13 comes on line.

    For the PLAAF, purchasing the Su-35 is a win-win. They will not only get a highly capable new aircraft, they will also acquire get an engine that has the power to make their sophisticated new J-20 a world-class fighter.
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Russia knows the Chinese will reverse engineer any technology that Russia sells them but Russia is so desperate to keep their manufacturing lines opn they sell the Chinese the planes anyway.
     
    INDIAN NATIONALIST likes this.
  12. arulcharles

    arulcharles Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    May be this time Russia would sell some old technologies in new color to china, PAK FA is a generation ahead of Su 35, su 35 bears the technologies that are already existed in Su 30mkm but they just update, It is no match for PAK FA
     
  13. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    From the best I can tell the Russians have given up on the T 50, which means they have given up on the PAK FA, so have the Indians, they are just doing the normal political double two step to confuse the voters and save face.
     
  14. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    What part of there is not going to be any T50 or PAK FA do you all not understand.
     

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