Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Russian Military: News & Updates

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by brain_dead, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Messages:
    13,820
    Likes Received:
    15,601
    Country Flag:
    India
    Actually all naval officers are Navel officers. we are very focussed in life. our eyes are fixed just within six inches of the navel of a women. lolz.
     
  2. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,365
    Likes Received:
    2,382
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Russian Junk
     
  3. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2012
    Messages:
    3,790
    Likes Received:
    954
    From Katyusha to Iskander-M: Top-10 Arms of Russian Missile Forces and Artillery

    On November 19, Russia celebrates the Missile Forces and Artillery Day. Take a look at the top-10 most famous missile and artillery weapons in the following photo gallery.

    [​IMG]

    The Grad multiple launch rocket launcher was developed during the Soviet times. It's capable of destroying ground units, military equipment, command posts, artillery and mortar batteries and other targets.

    Photo: The Grad multiple launch rocket system during field firing in the Leningrad Region.

    [​IMG]
    The Gvozdika (Сarnation) self-propelled howitzer is aimed to destroy infrantry firepower, different types of fortifications, as well as fight artillery and combat armored vehicles.

    Photo: The Gvozdika self-propelled howitzer during tactical exercises with live-fire training in the Primorye Territory.

    [​IMG]

    The Smerch multiple rocket system is designed to destroy almost all groups of targets at a distance of 20-90 kilometers. Smerch is the most destructive weapon of ground troops, except for nuclear arms.

    Photo: The Smerch multiple rocket system during the demonstration of military hardware at the 9th International Exhibition of Arms, Military Equipment and Ammunition in Nizhny Tagil.

    [​IMG]

    The Khrizantema-S (Golden daisy) anti-tank missile system is the most powerful of all existing anti-tank rocket systems in the world. It is aimed to destoy tanks, IFVs, fortifications, surface and low-speed air targets.

    Photo: The Khrizantema-S system takes part in Victory Day Parade rehearsal in Moscow.

    [​IMG]
    The BM-27 Uragan (Hurricane) self-propelled multiple rocket launcher system was developed in 1970s and is still used by the Russian army. It's main goal is defeating troops and other enemy targets at a distance from 10 to 35 kilometers.

    Photo: The BM-27 Uragan system during drills of the artillery units of the 5th Army in the Primorye Territory.

    [​IMG]

    The Soviet-made Katyusha multiple launch rocket system is the most effective weapon of its kind during the World War II.

    Photo: Katyusha multiple launch rocket system at the Baltic Fleet military airport in the Kaliningrad region.


    [​IMG]

    The Giatsint 2S5 (Hyacinth) heavy caliber guns are aimed to destroy enemy's manpower and hardware.

    Photo: The Giatsint 2S5 self-propelled guns shoot during a joint drill of the 5th Combined-Arms army of the Eastern Military District supported by the army aviation, bombers, fighter jets and long-range aircraft with Airborne Force units' participation held in the Primorye Territory.

    [​IMG]

    The Iskander-M missile system is designed not only to destroy different targets, but also to deliver tactical nuclear weapons.

    Photo: Cadets of the Ussuriysk Suvorov Military School look at the Iskander-M missile system during the opening ceremony of the 2016 Army military and technical forum in Vladivostok.

    [​IMG]

    The 2S7 Pion (Peony) self-propelled artillery gun which was modernized in early 1980s is now one of the most powerful SP guns.

    [​IMG]

    The 2S3 Akatsiya (Acacia) self-propelled artillery vehicle during a military exercise of missile and artillery unitsin the Primorye Territory.
     
  4. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2012
    Messages:
    3,790
    Likes Received:
    954
    AK-47 – a copy of the Sturmgewehr
    A popular view among people is that the model on which the Kalashnikov assault rifle was based was the German G-44 assault rifle (Sturmgewehr). However, this is not quite true. The issue of designing a series of small arms (assault rifle, carbine, submachine gun) using an intermediate cartridge was first raised in the Soviet Union as early as July 1943, after capturing a sample trophy of the German carbine Mkb-42(H).

    Soviet designers were assigned the task of creating automatic weapons using the 1943 model intermediate cartridge. The winner in the competition held in 1944 was the Sudayev assault rifle (AS-44). From the feedback and suggestions a decision was taken to refine and adopt Sudayev’s assault rifle.

    Sudayev suddenly died at the age of 34 in 1946 and, unfortunately, as it turned out, no one was available to finish this work. The question of designing an assault rifle was left open. A new contest was soon announced in which the technical specifications were primarily based on the features of the weapon Sudayev created, rather than on the German Sturmgewehr (Stg-44). The German Sturmgewehr was, however, used in comparative firing tests. After a series of complex and lengthy competitive contests, a decision was taken to go with the 7.62-mm Kalashnikov assault rifle (AK) or AK-47.

    AK-47 appeared in 1947
    The belief is that the Kalashnikov assault rifle appeared in the army in 1947. However, it usually takes a long time to pass from the adoption of a model to the beginning of mass production and its actual introduction into the armed forces. This is the story of the PPSh-41, SKS-45 and many other models of small arms.

    The Kalashnikov was no exception. Despite its designation as “Kalashnikov assault rifle, 1947 model”, it went into mass production and accordingly, was introduced into the armed forces only in 1949.

    The AK-47 was first used in combat in the operation codenamed ‘Vikhr’ (Whirlwind) in Hungary in October 1956, while the general public saw the Kalashnikov for the first time a year earlier, in the Soviet comedy Maxim Perepelitsa.

    The “Kalash” became popular for its ease of assembly
    While speaking about the merits of the Kalashnikov assault rifle, people often mention the simplicity and reliability of this weapon – and this is true, but this took a long time to achieve. The actual and final model was adopted only in 1959, as the Kalashnikov AKM, the “M” standing for modernized.

    The problem lay in the fact that the AK-47 was extremely difficult and expensive to produce, as from the stamping process they had to go back to more complex manufacturing, milling the firearm frame (receiver).

    The production of this assault rifle became intermittent, and the shortage of small arms in the army was made up by using the Simonov carbine. It became necessary to simplify the manufacturing of the Kalashnikov assault rifle, for which new varieties of steel and production technologies were used.

    A number of changes were made. The weight of the assault rifle was reduced by 600 grams, a knife bayonet was introduced for the first time, repacking the standard bayonet. One of the main advantages, in comparison with the AK-47, was the highly technological and relatively low cost production process of the weapon.

    Fedor Tokarev, the well-known Soviet designer and creator of the TT pistol and SVT-40 semi-automatic rifle, gave the following description of the AKM: “This model is reliable in operation, ensures high accuracy and precision shooting, and is relatively light.”

    The AKM was produced between the years 1960 and 1976, and likely became the most mass produced model of the Kalashnikov assault rifle in the Soviet Army. To this day, the AKM remains in service with airborne troops, as a silent weapon (with an installed silencer, the installation of which was problematic on the AK-74).

    The “Kalash” is unique
    Were there examples of small arms in other countries like the Kalashnikov, but were not copies of the original?

    Such a model was built in post-war Czechoslovakia.

    Countries of the Warsaw Pact occasionally used weapons designed not only in the USSR, but models that they themselves created. Czechoslovakia, which had a rich tradition of designing and producing small arms, was no exception. In 1958, the Czechoslovak Army adopted the assault rifle Čermak CZ SA Vz.58, which looks very similar to the Kalashnikov, but differs significantly in its design. This assault rifle is characterized by its high quality, although in terms of reliability, it is still inferior to the Kalashnikov.

    AKS-74U – the assault weapon
    It is often said that AKS-74U, with its shorter half-barrel and collapsible stock, was intended for airborne troops. This is not true. This model was initially designed for combat vehicle crews, artillery and communications units – or those soldiers who, because of the specificity of their tasks, did not have to spend a long time on the front firing lines.

    However, to test this new compact model assault rifle in a combat situation, the AKS-74U was sent to assault troops fighting in Afghanistan in 1982-83. All the unflattering and unpleasant nicknames given to this model are connected with the attempt to use this assault rifle to soldiers in units engaged in intense fighting.

    The major disadvantages of this truncated model – low accuracy of fire, shorter sighting range and quick overheating of the barrel—were soon unveiled here. After the Soviet troops withdrew from Afghanistan in 1989, the AKS-74U was withdrawn from service, sent for storage to warehouses and, later, because of the increased violence and aggravated criminal situation in the country, was issued to Interior Ministry personnel, where it is still being used.
     
  5. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    opening action of Slavic Brotherhood 2016. The exercise was held in Serbia and participants included Russia, Belarus and Serbia.
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
    5.jpg
    6.jpg
     
    Gessler and R!CK like this.
  6. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    1st stage of Slavic Brotherhood 2016
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
    5.jpg
     
    R!CK and Gessler like this.
  7. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    2nd stage of Slavic Brotherhood 2016
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
     
    R!CK and Gessler like this.
  8. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    Russian and Belarusian Paratroopers conduct a joint exercise at Brestsky range, Belarus
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
    5.jpg
     
    R!CK and Gessler like this.
  9. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    Russian-Belarusian airborne exercise using BTR-80s
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
    5.jpg
     
    R!CK and Agent_47 like this.
  10. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    airborne troops training with BTR-80 at Brestsky range, Belarus
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
     
    R!CK likes this.
  11. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    Paratroopers in Belarus after parachuting from an Il-76
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
     
    R!CK likes this.
  12. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    Counter Sabotage drill during the joint Russian-Belarusian exercise
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
    5.jpg
    6.jpg
     
    R!CK likes this.
  13. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    Urban training during an exercise in Egypt
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
    4.jpg
    5.jpg
     
    Dagger and R!CK like this.
  14. Zaslon

    Zaslon IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    25
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    Parachuting part of joint Russian-Egyptian exercise in Egypt
    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    3.jpg
     
    Hellfire, YarS and R!CK like this.
  15. YarS

    YarS Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2017
    Messages:
    671
    Likes Received:
    326
    Country Flag:
    Russian Federation
    Feb, 27 - birthday of SSO.
     
    Hellfire likes this.

Share This Page