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Russian satellites launch News & Discussion

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by brahmos_ii, Sep 24, 2013.

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  1. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    With the launch of ESA's Swarm trio set for 14 November, the first satellite has arrived safely at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia. This new mission will unravel one of the most mysterious aspects of our planet: the magnetic field.

    The arrival marks the beginning of the 'launch campaign', which includes an intensive period of tests to make sure that the satellites are fit for launch after their journey from Germany to Russia.

    The campaign also includes the careful task of fuelling the satellites and attaching them to the rocket that will deliver them into orbit.

    The remaining two satellites will arrive in the next couple of days, the second later today and the third at the weekend.

    All three will be launched together on a single Rockot.

    This first satellite has already been unloaded and taken by lorry to the integration facility, the 'MIK'.

    Swarm is the next in the series of Earth Explorer missions and ESA's first constellation to advance our understanding of how Earth works.

    The three satellites, developed for ESA by a consortium led by EADS Astrium GmbH, have a rather unusual shape - trapezoidal with a boom 9 m long that opens once in orbit.

    This long boom means that the sensors at the tip avoid any magnetic interference from the rest of the satellite. Magnetic cleanliness is paramount for the mission.

    Harnessing European and Canadian technological excellence, the three identical satellites will untangle and measure very precisely the different magnetic signals from Earth's core, mantle, crust and oceans, as well as its ionosphere and magnetosphere.

    The measurements from this state-of-the-art mission will yield new insights into many natural processes, from those occurring deep inside the planet to weather in space caused by solar activity.

    In turn, this information will yield a better understanding of why our magnetic field is weakening.

    [​IMG]
    Swarm is the next in the series of Earth Explorer missions and ESA's first constellation to advance our understanding of how Earth works.
     
  2. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Russia is planning to launch a light-class Rokot carrier rocket with three research satellites from the Plesetsk space center in November, the Defense Ministry said Monday.

    “The Plesetsk center has started preparations for the launch of three Swarm satellites designed for the study of the Earth’s magnetic field,” Defense Ministry spokesman Col. Dmitry Zenin said.

    “The spacecraft and the Rokot carrier rocket are being prepared for the launch, scheduled for November this year,” the official said.

    It will be the third launch of the Rokot this year from the Plesetsk space center in northern Russia.

    The previous launch was carried out on September 12 to deliver three communications satellites into orbit.

    The launch followed a nine-month suspension due to attempts to fix a glitch in the rocket’s booster.

    All launches of Rokots were suspended in January after the rocket’s Briz-KM booster failed to deliver three military satellites into their designated orbits, resulting in the loss of one of the satellites.

    The light-class Rokot launch vehicle is a modified version of the Russian RS-18 (SS-19 Stiletto) intercontinental ballistic missile. It uses the two original lower stages of the ICBM, in conjunction with an upper-stage block containing the Briz-KM booster and space-bound payloads.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Launch vehicles were once considered the Russian space industry’s main trump card. But in less than a decade, there have been more than a dozen accidents involving launch vehicles, most notably a Proton-M launch in July.

    The failures of the launch vehicles are just the latest indication that the Russian space industry needs reform. The management of the space industry is far from efficient. In addition, the industry suffers from completely worn out equipment.

    Meanwhile, skilled workers are getting older and low wages are not attracting young specialists into the sector. And that’s not all. The challenges facing the industry are so great that the highest levels of government are getting involved.
    Russia’s space industry on the verge of reform

    At the beginning of August Dmitry Rogozin, the deputy prime minister with responsibility for the space industry, announced: “There are so many problems in the astronautics industry that the government is simply not justified in affording the sector the opportunity to resolve them at its own discretion. The sector requires prolonged assistance in order to finally break the vicious circle of unfortunate events and accidents, which are discussed across our society with such vexation.”

    Rogozin suggested combining the astronautics and aviation industries under a unified technical policy as part of an initiative to inject radical change into the sector.

    The process to integrate these structures has already been launched, but such initiatives have failed miserably in the past. After the collapse of the Soviet Union and the disbandment of its space directorate, an independent Russian aviation and space agency emerged within the structure of the Ministry of General Machine Building. This was not conducive to achieving good results in astronautics and aviation.

    In the opinion of the Yuriy Krupnov, Chairman of the supervisory body of the Institute of Demographics, Migration and Regional Development there was “nothing” to that merger aside from resolving personnel issues.

    The expert spoke categorically on the current merger initiative: “These sectors have been in decline for 20 years and nothing will survive this latest reshuffle. This would be the final swansong for our aviation and astronautics industries.” In Krupnov’s opinion, a merger is only possible once each of the sectors are functioning effectively.

    Yury Karash, a corresponding member of the Russian Academy of Cosmonautics is for his part certain that creating any kind of integrated structure is not going to solve the main problem in Russian astronautics – the lack of clear objectives.

    “Instead of setting the right objectives, we are once again called upon to change the managerial structure of the aviation and astronautics industries. I really do not understand how a merger can be conducive to setting ambitious objectives, when we would not need to create anything completely new to achieve them,” Karash said.

    Rogozin’s initiative has also been criticized from a purely economic point of view. Ivan Moiseev, head of the Moscow Space Club remarked that aviation and space have their own specific character: “These sectors have a different economic base. Aviation production is reliant on mass orders - both civil and military. The state in turn acts as the principle customer for space technology almost without exception. This gives rise to a different legal basis - both internationally and domestically,” said Moiseev.
     
  4. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Russia will launch the first Proton-M unmanned carrier rocket in three months on Monday, bringing into orbit a European telecom satellite, the country’s space agency said Sunday.

    The rocket carrying the Astra 2E satellite will blast off the Baikonur space port in Kazakhstan at 1:38 a.m. Moscow time (9:38 p.m. Sunday UTC), a spokesman for Roscosmos told RIA Novosti.

    The previous Proton-M launch on July 2 ended in a crash seconds after start. The incident, which led to the loss of three navigation satellites for Glonass, Russia’s answer to GPS, was blamed on sensors installed upside down and hammered in to fit by careless manufacturers.

    The incident boosted Russian government’s plans to revamp the country’s space industry, which saw a string of failed launches in recent years. A draft of the reform, which proposes to consolidate the 100-plus state-run space industry enterprises into one corporation or half a dozen holdings, was recently filed with the Cabinet and is now under review.

    The six-ton Astra 2E, manufactured in France for Luxembourg-based SES S.A. satellite operator, will provide television and radio broadcasts, as well as mobile and internet communications for users in Europa, Africa and the Middle East.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Russia is planning to launch four more Proton carrier rockets by the end of this year, following a successful launch in September after a long suspension, Russia’s space agency Roscosmos said Wednesday.

    “We have planned a total of five launches. One has been carried out, and four more are left to go by the end of the year,” said Denis Lyskov, Roscosmos’ deputy head.

    The suspension of Proton launches was ordered in July after a Proton-M rocket carrying three satellites for the Glonass positioning system, Russia’s answer to the GPS, crashed in a ball of flames seconds after blasting off from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan.

    The three-month hiatus successfully ended on September 30, when a Proton-M rocket with a Briz-M booster put a European telecom satellite into orbit.

    A space industry source told RIA Novosti on Tuesday that Roscosmos had scheduled a total of 14 space launches by the end of this year.

    Russia is planning to launch four more Proton carrier rockets by the end of this year, following a successful launch in September after a long suspension, Russia’s space agency Roscosmos said Wednesday.

    “We have planned a total of five launches. One has been carried out, and four more are left to go by the end of the year,” said Denis Lyskov, Roscosmos’ deputy head.

    The suspension of Proton launches was ordered in July after a Proton-M rocket carrying three satellites for the Glonass positioning system, Russia’s answer to the GPS, crashed in a ball of flames seconds after blasting off from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan.

    The three-month hiatus successfully ended on September 30, when a Proton-M rocket with a Briz-M booster put a European telecom satellite into orbit.

    A space industry source told RIA Novosti on Tuesday that Roscosmos had scheduled a total of 14 space launches by the end of this year.

    Russia Plans 4 Proton Rocket Launches by Year-End | Russia | RIA Novosti
     
  6. S K Mittal

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    russia is trying hard to regain their lost status of cold war era.
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Russians have successfully Launched the ALS Proton-M with Astra satellite. THey are good in their capabilities. Jus that they should not let go of their R&D and development.
     
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