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Save INS Viraat

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by MilSpec, Feb 21, 2017.

  1. MilSpec

    MilSpec Mod MODERATOR

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    #saveinsviraat

    We are building Patel and Shivaji statues for 2 Billion and 0.5 billion dollars respectively, and with the state of AP and central govt squabbling over the bill to turn INS Viraat into a Museum, INS Viraat will be scrapped unless people don't speak up. We saw INS Vikrant being cut into pieces, it would be a travesty if INS Viraat has the same fate.


    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ay-be-sold-for-scrap/articleshow/57261801.cms


    @PARIKRAMA @vstol jockey @Levina @Grevion @Gessler @anant_s @nair
     
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  2. Ankit Kumar 001

    Ankit Kumar 001 Major REGISTERED

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    Personally speaking, if the museum plans don't succeed.

    She should rather be used as a target platform and later as a home for sea animals.
     
  3. AbRaj

    AbRaj Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Better use it as training platform like Chinese are doing with lioning
     
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  4. PARIKRAMA

    PARIKRAMA Captain IDF NewBie

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    Ironic that the carrier which served our nation for decades today is absolutely homeless due to silly squabbling of a bill....
    We as a country can spend billions in making statues, converting politicians tombs into memorials, in fact even if a small piece of stone resemble any shape/look alike of a god, we run hard to do a "darshan" , pour some money out and even make a whole temple over it with full support of public, followed by netas to protect the vote bank and later live with it like it's natural thing to do...

    And the ship which protected our shores for decades is homeless, unwanted and most importantly today useless till someone pays the bill..

    Wish GOI wakes up to understand how to preserve a Hero's tale for future generations to see and feel what it meant to be part of a legend called INS Viraat.
     
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  5. Ankit Kumar 001

    Ankit Kumar 001 Major REGISTERED

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    Would have been a good idea if it would have been 2 decades younger.

    At 60+ years its propulsion system and overall condition of the hull is simply not good enough to operate at sea without relatively big investments.

    Then many would say it would be better to still keep is as a permanently docked training platform. Well we now have STBF at INS HANSA and there is simply no compulsion to Indian Navy to pay more for INS Viraat.

    Further given its history of importance , which is not even 1/3rd of what INS VIKRANT had , I would like it to be used as a target platform if the costs of converting it to a museum is too high.

    It has already been stripped of its SAM, its gun, its Radars, Sonar , Fire Control Radars , Counter Measures System and others which could still serve on other IN Vessels.

    Given no urge [which is 100% logically correct on our part ] for re introducing STOVL operations, I don't see how it can still be viable enough to be even considered as a training platform.

    PS: I am 100% against it being scrapped.
     
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  6. SvenSvensonov

    SvenSvensonov MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    She's 60 years old now, a bit long in the tooth for supporting at-sea carrier-based training. Maintenance costs, evolving carrier training requirements, which can be replicated elsewhere (on land or with trainers on other, less old carriers - think T-54A), she served her purpose but now it's time to move on. Despite its age and limited tactical functionality, Liaoning is a fundamentally different carrier suited to modern opts and training for them. It is a modern carrier design, fitted with modern aircraft and supporting modern tactics. Though China intents to use Liaoning to develop its tactics rather then use her to support combat ops, she has life left, but Viraat deserves to rest her legs.

    Give her a burial at sea. It's the proper send off for a storied vessel and let nature claim her as their own.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Her time has passed. Giver her a proper send off.

    I don't favor using her as a live target though. Demo charges and turn her into an artificial reef for recreational divers and sea life to enjoy, as was done with Oriskany.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017
  7. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    Personally, I don't see anything wrong with AP Govt's proposal that Union govt. pay half the amount needed to convert it to a museum. Residual AP (after creation of Telangana) is not in a very good economic shape just yet, they have some serious spending to do on capital development and public infrastructure - I think it should be appreciated that they actually came forward to make the carrier a museum as a possible tourist attraction.

    Besides, INS Viraat is a national icon - it served the whole country, not just AP. So I don't see anything wrong is the central govt. paying the 50% (Rs. 500 crores, peanuts). It need not necessarily come from MoD alone.

    Hope Parrikar, Jaitley & Modi take notice of this issue.
     
  8. Grevion

    Grevion Professional Think Troll IDF NewBie

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    With Gujarat and Maharashtra building the Statue of Unity and the Shivaji statue respectively it is really a delightful move by the AP govt to come forward for INS Viraat. We should cherish her glorious service in the Indian Navy as a museum. No more motorcycles made out of our salvaged Aircraft carrier.
     
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  9. AbRaj

    AbRaj Captain FULL MEMBER

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    That's a bit cruel. She is a part of family , like grandma. And by training I meant what @Ankit Kumar 001 said ,a permanent docked platform or educational purpose Or may be museum.
     
  10. Levina

    Levina Guest



    I hope the hashtag to save INS Viraat trends and gets the attention of authorities before this one gets junked too.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 22, 2017
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  11. Nilgiri

    Nilgiri Lieutenant IDF NewBie

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    Time's running out folks!
     
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  12. nair

    nair Guest

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  13. nair

    nair Guest

    There is a proposal for converting her to a Luxury Hotel :facepalm:
     
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  14. IndiranChandiran

    IndiranChandiran Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    I think we ought to drop the sentimentality & get practical .Either use this as a training ship or target practise or sink it & let it turn into a coral .

    I remember all the breast beating & wailing nearly 2 decades ago too when INS Vikrant was being retired from service .The mourning then was definitely at a higher pitch than this one .All sorts of ideas were experimented with .Eventually it got scrapped .When will we learn to let go with grace & dignity ???
     
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  15. nair

    nair Guest

    Aircraft carrier INS Viraat will fade into history today, marking the close of an era
    It was the summer of 1986 when the Indian Navy was abuzz with excitement, waiting for the arrival of INS Viraat, India’s second aircraft carrier, which would radically alter the Navy’s operational paradigms. It was also a time when we, as navy men, had just been commissioned. The 1980s had seen the induction of several new classes of ships. In fact, the entire inventory had undergone a sea change then with the most important of these acquisitions being the mighty Viraat. We secretly nursed the ambition of driving the jumbo-sized ‘Grey Ferrari’ and launching her mean flying machines. A year later, I was appointed on the missile destroyer, INS Ranvir, based at Mumbai. Time flew and I soon found myself in the midst of a huge crowd that had gathered on the South breakwater in August 1987 as Viraat drew in majestically. I shared the sense of awe everyone expressed and could sense the sheer might that she exuded.

    The carrier environment

    Watch-keeping on Ranvir was a great learning curve which was made steeper by the presence of the carrier in the fleet. As any navy man will tell you, fleet operations acquire a different and distinct hue when an aircraft carrier is around. It was our great fortune that our formative years were spent in such a tough environment. Be it anti-submarine warfare or flying ops, underway replenishment or missile defence, an aircraft carrier brings in a unique set of dynamics and makes life on the bridge and operations room that much more exciting and busy not only on the “Flattop” itself but on all the combatants in her company. In a sense, we cut our teeth in the best learning environment possible.

    This was also true of our time in the harbour when the carrier generated a great deal of hustle and bustle. Being in the same fleet meant that one visited Viraat often and each time I left the ship I came away with the feeling of admiration at the way things seemed to work with clockwork precision. The crew always seemed to have an air about them and were usually the winners in most of the intra-fleet competitions, be it on the sports field or in academic endeavours.

    My duties over the next few years continued on other ships in the Western Fleet, and in the vicinity of the “Flattop”. She continued to be the toast of the Navy and my desire to serve on her remained undiminished. Finally, in 2003, I was appointed the fleet communications officer reporting to the Western Fleet Commander. The carrier was the first choice as the flagship because of operational and administrative advantages. We spent many days on the carrier and she soon became a second home. With a better understanding of fleet operations and tactics, I was able to appreciate what working on the aircraft carrier was like. I spent many an hour trying to walk on her deck or watching her aircraft, the Sea Harriers, take off or land. I could now claim some kinship with Viraat though I was still not a fully paid up member.


    Reassuring presence

    Time passed and I moved to other ships. And the aircraft carrier sailed on. But all good things have to come to an end. The news of her decommissioning has filled me with sorrow. She has been the centrepiece of the Indian Navy over 30 years, her life mirroring ours. Viraat and ships of that generation ushered in a huge change in our fleet operations and in the way we thought of tactics or imagined combat. For three decades, she showcased India’s blue water capability across the seas. When the security environment in the neighbourhood was fraught with uncertainty, her presence was deeply reassuring as she protected and projected India’s maritime interests in the neighbourhood and beyond.

    Twenty years ago, on January 31, 1997, when another iconic ship in India’s naval history, INS Vikrant, and India’s first aircraft carrier, was decommissioned, I saw many navy men of that era who had been associated with her with hardly a dry eye. The thought of it being the turn of Viraat now induces the same feeling in our generation of officers and sailors. We may not wear our hearts on our sleeves but to recollect the lyrics of the famous Manna Dey song, Viraat has been both our “Aarzoo” and “Aabrooh”. When the naval ensign is lowered for one last time on her today, March 6, 2017, she will slowly fade away and mark the end of an era. But she will live forever in our memories.

    Commodore Srikant Kesnur is a serving Naval Officer
     
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