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SIBERIA TO SEPARATE FROM RUSSIA AND BECOME PART OF USA.

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by Averageamerican, Dec 4, 2015.

  1. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Keep Dreaming :blah:, first try to liberate Cremia from Russia :rockroll:

    Then talk about siberia
     
  2. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    First save your own territory from ISIS immigrants , then think about siberia:facepalm:
     
    arulcharles likes this.
  3. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Urhh, no. They're really not the same thing at all. Crimea was always Russian and full of Russians. It only became part of the Ukraine in 1957 when the Ukraine was part of the Soviet Union and therefore still under Moscow. It was surprising it didn't go back at the end of the Cold War and now it has. Siberia is part of Russia, acquiring it would be like Russia acquiring the West Coast. The reaction is a guaranteed all-out nuclear war, and the only bit you got right is that it will be too late to do anything about it.

    Kosovo would have been a better example.
     
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Siberians should become independent from Russia, they are being taken advantage of by Russia looting their nati0nal resources.
     
  5. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    So you want to loot them instead? Siberia is part of Russia and has been so since before the USA existed. Siberia is no more likely to become independent from Russia than Texas is to rejoin Mexico.
     
  6. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Odder things have happen, Russia is declining rapidly.
     
  7. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    You should be more worried about your President in 2017. Your have only two options left. Devil or the deep sea. If republicans refuse to nominate Trump in case he falls short of half way mark, you might have a civil war.
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Kind of doubt that any one cares all that much. Looks like its going to be Hillary, least that's what the Bookmakers odds in Las Vegas says.
     
  9. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    irrespective of who wins and becomes the President of USA, you guys are doomed. Both are equally stupid and destructive. If trump wins, USA will survive as a Christian nation, If Hillary wins, be prepared to be ruled by muslims.
     
  10. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Presidency
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Betting odds are five to one that Hillary wins, and US is a lot less likely to be ruled by Muslims then India.
     
  12. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Don't see it myself.
     
  13. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Islam is the third largest faith in the United States after Christianity and Judaism.[1] According to a 2010 study, it is followed by 0.9% of the population, compared to 70.6% who follow Christianity, 22.8% unaffiliated, 1.9% Judaism, 0.7% Buddhism, and 0.7% Hinduism.[1][2] According to a new estimate in 2016, there are 3.3 million Muslims living in the United States, about 1% of the total U.S. population.[3]

    American Muslims come from various backgrounds and, according to a 2009 Gallup poll, are one of the most racially diverse religious groups in the United States.[4] Native-born American Muslims are mainly African Americans who make up about a quarter of the total Muslim population. Many of these have converted to Islam during the last seventy years. Conversion to Islam in large urban areas[5] has also contributed to its growth over the years.

    I don't consider African Americans that converted to Islam real Muslims, real Muslims are about .006% of US population.
     
  14. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Russia bans Siberia independence march
    Moscow also threatens to block BBC Russian service after it carries interview with march organiser on its website

    [​IMG]
    Rosneft's Vankor oil field: many Siberians would like to resource extraction companies pay taxes there rather than in Moscow. Photograph: Reuters
    Alec Luhn in Moscow

    Tuesday 5 August 2014 12.56 EDT Last modified on Saturday 16 January 2016 08.31 EST


    Save for later Article saved
    Russian authorities have banned a Siberian independence march and threatened to block the BBC Russian service over its coverage of separatist protests.

    In sharp contrast to the treatment of separatists in Crimea and eastern Ukraine, Moscow has made it clear that it does not welcome similar aspirations at home.

    The media watchdog may block the website of the BBC Russian service over an interview with Artyom Loskutov, an organiser of the March for Siberian Federalisation, the newspaper Izvestiya reported on Tuesday. The march was due to take place on 17 August in Novosibirsk, Siberia's largest city.

    The federal communications monitoring service has sent a letter demanding the interview be deleted for violating a recently passed law against "calls to mass unrest, extremist activities or participation in illegal public events".

    The BBC said it had no plans to remove the material in question and had requested an interview with Russian officials about the matter.

    Russia's prosecutor general has issued warnings to 14 media outlets covering the protest under the country's extremism law, and blocked an event page for the march on Russia's most popular social network. The editor of Slon.ru, which was forced by the prosecutor general to remove an interview with Loskutov, later argued in a Facebook post that the article had not been in violation of the extremism law because it did not name a specific time or place. It also noted that the activists had not yet been given permission for the march.

    The Novosibirsk mayor's office reportedly denied permission on Tuesday to hold the march "in order to ensure the inviolability of the constitutional order, territorial integrity and sovereignty of the Russian Federation".

    Loskutov, an artist who is known for organising an annual absurdist rally called Monstration, told the Guardian that the activists had re-applied for permission to hold a March for the Inviolability and Observation of the Principles of Federalism.

    Washington and Kiev have said Russia is providing arms, men and funding to the separatist rebels fighting government forces in eastern Ukraine, while cracking down on similar trends at home. Moscow passed a law in December to make spreading separatist views punishable by up to five years in jail.

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    Loskutov said the Novosibirsk protest was meant to both ridicule the Kremlin's hypocrisy on self-determination in Ukraine and to raise the issue of Siberia's delayed development. Most of Russia's oil and gas output comes from western Siberia, but the region lags behind Moscow, St Petersburg and some southern areas in quality of life ratings.

    "It's using the rhetoric that our government and their propaganda use," Loskutov said. "They decided to tell us how great it is when some republic moves for self-determination. Okay, well let's apply this to other regions. Can Siberia allow itself this same rhetoric? It turns out it can't."

    Olesya Gerasimenko, a correspondent for the Kommersantnewspaper, said most Russians in the regions would not support secession, but would back greater economic autonomy, including measures forcing resource extraction companies to pay taxes in the regions where they operate rather than in Moscow.

    "If we support the Ukrainian people's right to federalisation, why don't we support the Russian people's right to federalisation?" Gerasimenko asked. "The mood of the separatists in Russia is socio-economic in nature, not for the autonomy of a certain region, so this is all exaggerated. But in light of recent events in Ukraine, it seems more dangerous."
     
  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Putin's actions in Ukrain in 2014 were driven by fear of an Orange Revolution-style upheaval at home. All this talk about Trojan horses and foreign agents – is a long-term development. It started in the mid-2000s, and it actually became exacerbated in the recent years with the protests in 2011-2012. Basically, the revolution in Ukraine, the Euromaidan, was perceived as a challenge to Russia, because Ukraine is perceived as very close as a country, very much like Russia. Therefore it is believed that if nothing is done then it will happen in Russia as well.


    A former intelligence officer, Vladimir Putin may have as good a sense as anyone as to the prospect for political unreset in Russia. He appears to have a well founded fear of such developments. In February 2014 it appeared that the government of Ukraine had embarked on a ten-fold enlargement of its riot control police. At the same time, Russia embarked on a ten-fold enlargement of its recently created Military Police, earmarked for riot control. The government is paranoid about conceding any political space to critics. Putin's popularity has consistently declined since the overwhelming 71 percent of votes that he received in the 2004 presidential elections. The political shenanigans that gained him more than 350 votes in the Duma in the 2007 election produced fewer than 300 seats in the 2011 election, and provoked the largest and most sustained public demonstrations seen since the financial crisis in 1998.

    About 500 people were detained Monday in Moscow and St Petersburg at unauthorized rallies 24 February 2014 in protest at the imprisonment of seven opposition activists. The crowd chanted "Maidan! Maidan!" before riot police moved in, arresting scores of demonstrators. People stood behind a makeshift barricade of burning tires waving Ukrainian flags and banging sticks against metal shields. The crowd also shouted in Ukrainian "Bandu het" (Out with the gang!) and hurled insults at riot police, calling them by their Ukrainian name, "Berkut."

    A spokesman for the Moscow police department said 420 people were detained during a rally in downtown Moscow, which it said had been attended by some 500 people in total. The event had not been approved by Moscow City Hall and thus violated the law on public gatherings. Those detained “were continuing their illegal actions despite police demands to stop,” a police spokesman said, adding that they face misdemeanor charges. Sixty people were detained at a similar rally in St. Petersburg, which, according to city police, gathered about 100 activists. Media reports said the demonstrators gathered to show support for a group of seven activists sentenced earlier that day to up to four years in prison for involvement in an anti-Kremlin rally on Bolotnaya Square in Moscow that ended in violent clashes with police in May 2012.
     

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