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SIBERIA TO SEPARATE FROM RUSSIA AND BECOME PART OF USA.

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by Averageamerican, Dec 4, 2015.

  1. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov accused the West of seeking a "regime change" in Russia by imposing sanctions because of the Ukraine conflict. Lavrov said November 22, 2014 that prominent figures in Western countries are saying there is a need to impose sanctions that will destroy Russia's economy and incite public protests.
    “Western leaders publicly state that the sanctions must hurt [Russia's] economy and stir up public protests. The West doesn’t want to change Russia’s policies. They want a regime change. Practically nobody denies that,” Lavrov told the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, a leading think-tank in Moscow. His comments came two days after Russian President Vladimir Putin said his country must prevent a "color revolution," referring to protests that toppled leaders in other former Soviet republics.

    Sergei Kolesnikov profited as a Putin crony in 1990s St. Petersburg fled Russia in 2010. Kolesnikov says that the Kremlin inner circle, who have effectively painted themselves into a corner -- albeit a very wealthy, powerful one -- with no easy way out. "Putin's entire chain of command is built on a foundation of corruption," Kolesnikov says. "To see power go to another party or other people would be to put themselves under enormous threat of criminal investigation and inevitable punishment."

    Brian Whitmore wrote December 23, 2015 that "... the Kremlin understands all too well that the sky-high public support is largely based on a collective hallucination -- a euphoric patriotic purple haze resulting from the annexation of Crimea and the illusion that Russia is again a superpower. And they understand that once everybody comes down from this television-induced acid trip and hungover Russians have a clear view of their new reality, there's gonna be hell to pay."

    "To ordinary people, the fruit of Putin's foreign policy is bitter," political commentator Leonid Bershidsky wrote in Bloomberg View. "All that Russians have gotten from Putin's international activity is a boost to their pride, delivered by the Kremlin's propaganda channels -- not a tangible benefit as the economy continues to buckle under the weight of falling commodity prices."
     
  2. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Leave it alone or they'll nuke you.
     
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Syrian rebels fire a $60,000 American-made missile at a $4.5million Russian tank | Daily Mail Online

    Russia's Deadly T-90 Tank vs. America's TOW Missile: Who Wins?
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    Robert Beckhusen
    March 28, 2016


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    For all the videos coming out of the Syrian civil war, a one minute, 31-second clip of a U.S.-made TOW missile slamming into a T-90 tank got more attention than most. In the video uploaded in February, Russia’s most advanced operational battle tank met one of the United States’ main tank killers on the battlefield.
     
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    They have been threating that for 70 years, but they know we will, we have done it before.
     
  5. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The enemy didn't have nukes in 1945.
     
  6. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    How about all blacks get a freedom from US and form a new nation?? If that is not going to happen soon ISIS terrorist immigrants might form caliphate soon in US and Europe:facepalm:
     
  7. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    These 5 Facts Explain Russia’s Economic Decline
    Aug. 14, 2015
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    Sasha Mordovets—Getty ImagesRussian President Vladimir Putin delivers his annual state of the nation address to the National Assembly in Grand Kremlin Palace on in Moscow on Dec. 4, 2014.
    Corruption, cheap oil and unproductive workers all hold Russia back—though Russians don't seem to care

    For the first time since 2009—low point of the global economic slowdown—Russia is in recession. Its economy will contract 3 percent this year, though Moscow’s $360 billion in cash reserves will cushion the immediate blow. Still, as President Vladimir Putin continues to try to assert Russian power on the international stage, it has become clear that he is now ruling a “submerging market.” Unless something changes, Russia is in for a slow and steady economic decline. These five sets of stats explain why.

    (TIME, International Monetary Fund)

    1. Lack of Diversification

    It’s not simply the size of your economy, but its diversity and resilience that counts. For years, the Kremlin has supported and protected large state-owned companies at the expense of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). But those smaller firms are the foundation of any strong and well-diversified economy. SMEs spur innovation and respond effectively to changing times, technologies, and consumer tastes. In the EU, SMEs contribute an average of 40 percent to their respective countries’ GDP; in Russia, SMEs contribute just 15 percent. Those are daunting figures for anyone looking to start a business in Russia.

    Things aren’t getting better—between 2008 and 2012, Russia’s private sector lost 300,000 jobs while the state added 1.1 million workers to its payroll. Rather than diversifying, Moscow is doubling down on its state-centered approach to economic development.

    (JYSkebank, The Economist)

    2. At the Mercy of Oil Markets

    The price of oil has now fallen below $45 a barrel—welcome to the new normal. OPEC continues to pump oil at historic rates as it tries to price out competitors, and Iran expects to bring over a million new barrels a day to world markets after the lifting of international sanctions. These are deeply troubling developments for Moscow, which relies on oil and gas sales for nearly 50 percent of its government revenues. In 1999, oil and gas accounted for less than half of Russia’s export proceeds; today they account for 68 percent. Moscow has grown so reliant on energy sales that for each dollar the price of oil drops, Russia loses about $2 billion in potential sales. For Russia to balance its budget, oil will need to surge back to $100 a barrel. That’s going to take a while.

    (CNBC, CNN, Wall Street Journal , World Affairs, EIA, BBC, Financial Times)

    3. At the Mercy of Sanctions

    Moscow’s over-reliance on crude oil—which makes up 40 percent of Russia’s state budget—has also left the country particularly vulnerable to international sanctions. Given the age of many existing fields, Russia will increasingly depend on cutting-edge technology from Western firms to pump oil from difficult-to-reach shale and deep-water reserves. These sources could account for more than 15% of the world’s undiscovered oil reserves and 30% of the gas. Some argue that Russia can turn for help to China—but while China wants more Russian oil and gas, it doesn’t have the technology Russia needs to draw those resources from the ground.The IMF believes sanctions could eventually cost Russia 9 percent of its GDP.

    (EIA, Forbes, Reuters)

    4. Russia’s Other Problems

    Russians aren’t nearly as productive as they could be. For each hour worked, the average Russian worker contributes $25.90 to Russia’s GDP. The average Greek worker adds $36.20 per hour of work. And Greece is not a country you want to trail in productivity. The average for U.S. workers? $67.40.

    In addition, endemic corruption costs the Russian economy between $300 and $500 billion each year, or roughly the cost of three Greek bailout packages combined. This year, Freedom House gave the country a 6.75 on its corruption scale; 7 is “most corrupt.”

    It’s no surprise then that well-educated Russians are leaving their country in droves. Between 2012 and 2013, more than 300,000 people left Russia in search of greener economic pastures, and experts believe that number has only risen since Moscow’s annexation of Crimea last year.

    (Bloomberg, OECD, PBS, Telegraph, Wall Street Journal, Freedom House, Washington Post)

    5. No Incentive to Change

    Russia’s biggest problem may be denial. Typically, a stumbling economy brings about change in political leadership. Some countries, like Greece, take this to an extreme—Athens has seen five different governments in five years. But Russians have gone the other way—as their economy has slowed, Putin has grown more popular; he now holds an approval rating of 86 percent. More surprising is that while 73 percent of Russians are unhappy with their economy, 7 in 10 approve of the way Putin is handling it.

    How is that possible? About 90 percent of all Russians get their news from Russian television channels directly controlled by the Kremlin. By framing sanctions and the invasion of Ukraine as “Russia vs. the West”, Putin has succeeded in stoking the country’s nationalism. Today, 63 percent of Russians have a very favorable view of their country, up from 29 percent in 2013 and 51 percent in 2014. It’s easier under those circumstances to blame bad economic circumstances on outsiders. Credit where credit’s due—Putin knows what his people want to hear. It’s just not clear if he knows how to fix his flailing economy.

    (TIME, Pew Research Center, Washington Post, Pew Research Center)
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    upload_2016-4-7_9-7-2.png
    Russian Economic Crisis Risks Stagnation, Degradation (Op-Ed)
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    Andrei Makhonin / Vedomosti
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    Natalya Zubarevich
    The Russian economy is locked in an especially bad crisis. It differs significantly from the crises of 1998 and 2008-2009, when rapid downturns were followed by equally rapid recoveries. If anything, the current crisis more closely resembles that of the early 1990s, when Russia was transitioning from a planned to a market economy. Although salaries fell further then — by more than 50 percent — the same institutional problems caused both crises. The norms and rules now in place in the Russian economy are blocking its further development, just as they did back then.

    Budgets are in the worst condition. The federal budget deficit for 2015 totaled 2 trillion rubles ($32.8 billion) or 2.5 percent of gross domestic product. The combined deficit for all regional and municipal budgets totaled 2.7 trillion rubles ($44.3 billion), or 3.5 percent of GDP — 11 percent more than in 2014.

    Industrial output fell by 5 percent by May 2015. Household personal incomes dropped last year by 4.7 percent (and by 6.9 percent this February when compared to February 2015). Consumption slumped sharply, causing a 10 percent decline in retail sales. Construction was down by 13 percent in September 2015, and by 7 percent for the year overall. Investment continues to fall for the third consecutive year, and each year the rate of decline increases. Last year alone investment dropped by 8.4 percent. That means the crisis is continuing, and even if this or that sector has already "hit bottom," there is no guarantee that investment will not fall even further — because there are no drivers of growth in the Russian economy.
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Russia Economy 2016 Update: Contraction Of 1.9 Percent Predicted On Low Oil Prices, World Bank
    By Lydia Tomkiw@lydiatomkiw On 04/06/16 AT 8:36 AM

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      Pump jacks are seen at the Lukoil-owned Imilorskoye oil field, as the sun sets, outside the west Siberian city of Kogalym, Russia, in this January 25, 2016 file photo. Photo: REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin/Files
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      Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin before a meeting on the preparations for the upcoming Victory Day, marking the anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in WWII, April 5, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Alexander Zemlianichenko/Pool

    Low oil prices coupled with Western economic sanctions have hit the Russian economy harder than initially expected. Russia’s gross domestic product is expected to contract by 1.9 percent in 2016, the World Bank predicted in a report released Wednesday.

    While the Panama Papers, a massive leak this week of documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca, have revealed a vast web of offshore wealth tied to Russian President Vladimir Putin, average Russians continue to see their standard of living decline. Russia’s statistical service said 3.1 million more people were living in a state of poverty in 2015 for a total of 19.2 million people living in poverty out of a population of approximately 142 million. The World Bank expects the trend to continue with poverty levels hitting lows not seen since 2007, “undoing nearly a decade’s worth of gains.”
     

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