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South Sudan's says Sudan has declared war

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by SajeevJino, Apr 24, 2012.

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  1. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    South Sudan's President Salva Kiir says Sudan has "declared war" on his country, following weeks of fighting along their common border.

    Mr Kiir was speaking in China, which is a major buyer of oil from both countries but has long been an ally of Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir.

    On Monday, UN chief Ban Ki-moon condemned Sudan for bombing a border town in the South.

    South Sudan became independent last year, following decades of conflict.

    Mr Kiir was speaking as he met Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao in Beijing, after arriving there on Monday for a five-day visit.

    Mr Kiir said his visit came "at a very critical moment for the Republic of South Sudan because our neighbour in Khartoum has declared war on the Republic of South Sudan".

    Beijing has urged an end to the recent hostilities, during which Southern forces occupied Sudan's most important oil field in the Heglig area, before withdrawing.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17826316
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  2. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Sudan and South Sudan close to war

    Sudan denies responsibility for bombing market town as both sides trade allegations of sabotage\\


    [​IMG]
    An SPLA soldier in the market in Rubkona, near Bentiu, which was destroyed in an air strike.

    All-out war between Sudan and South Sudan has edged closer as warplanes bombed a large town in the South, destroying a street market, killing a boy and injuring 10 people.

    Sudan's president, Omar al-Bashir, further ratcheted up the tension on Monday by suggesting the time for talking is over, leaving only "the language of the gun and ammunition".

    Weeks of fighting have brought the neighbours to the brink less than a year after South Sudan gained independence. On Monday the European Union joined the United States and African Union in urging restraint.

    Such pleas seemed increasingly hopeless as Sudanese MiG 29 jets bombed an area near Bentiu in South Sudan, according to officials and witnesses.

    One rocket just missed a key bridge, which links Bentiu with the disputed border and Heglig oilfields to the north. Another landed in the nearby Rubkona market, a heavily populated area.

    Several shops were destroyed and one man was mutilated almost beyond recognition. The burned body of the boy lay flat on his back near the centre of the blast site, a hand clutching at the sky.

    A hospital official in Bentiu told the Associated Press that 10 people were wounded. Reuters quoted officials and witnesses saying that three people had died.

    South Sudanese soldiers and civilians returned volleys of futile small arms fire. Major General Mac Paul, the deputy director of military intelligence for South Sudan, said: "The bombing amounts to a declaration of war."

    Sudan denied any involvement. Its military spokesman, Al-Sawarmi Khalid, told Reuters: "We have no relation to what happened in Unity state, and we absolutely did not bomb anywhere in South Sudan."

    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile, Bashir arrived in Heglig, the oil-rich border town whose recent occupation by South Sudanese troops sparked the latest crisis. "We will not negotiate with the South's government, because they don't understand anything but the language of the gun and ammunition," he told Sudanese troops at a barracks.

    General Kamal Abdul Maarouf, a Sudanese commander who led the battles in Heglig, told Reuters that his army had killed 1,200 South Sudanese troops in fighting in the area – an account that South Sudan denied.

    The countries are clashing over the demarcation of their border and the sharing of oil revenues, halting nearly all the oil production that underpins both economies. Bashir has vowed to teach South Sudan "a final lesson by force".

    Immediate tensions appeared to have eased on Friday when South Sudan said it was withdrawing its troops from Heglig following mounting international pressure. The African Union and the UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon had condemned the occupation as illegal.

    But on Saturday, a Muslim mob burned a Catholic church in Sudan frequented mostly by South Sudanese.

    And on Sunday the two countries clashed near Teshwin, to the south of Heglig. There was also fighting further south, as well as in Talodi in South Kordofan in Sudan. In both countries, rebel groups allegedly used as proxy militias apparently took part.

    Heglig, which was one of Sudan's main sources of income, was all but destroyed under South Sudanese control. The South Sudanese army says the oil processing facility was hit by Sudanese planes, but Sudan says it was an act of deliberate economic sabotage by the South Sudanese. "The Sudanese are now trying to take revenge and do as much damage as they can before the rainy season starts," one local source said.

    Heglig has been thoroughly looted, including by civilians. Several men in Rubkona market wear jumpsuits belonging to an oil company. Others sell goods raided from the oil workers' compound, by far the most prosperous settlement for miles around.

    The fighting has apparently stiffened the resolve of the South Sudanese. "We are now being forced into war,' said Stephen Bading, a civil servant. "We are not intending to fight – our president has a saying that he would not take his people to war – but if the enemy[makes] a series of attacks, intended to target the South, definitely we have to defend ourselves."

    As the confrontation escalates, the international community has called for a ceasefire. On Friday Barack Obama asked the presidents of Sudan and South Sudan to resume negotiations and said conflict is not inevitable.

    The African Union called on both countries to end "senseless fighting" and on Monday the European Union urged a return to the negotiating table.

    South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July last year after an independence vote, the culmination of a 2005 peace treaty after decades of war that killed more than 2 million people.

    Sudan and South Sudan close to war | World news | The Guardian
     
  3. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Thats didn't take long
     
  4. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Sudan market bombing a "declaration of war": South

    OUTSIDE BENTIU, South Sudan (Reuters) -
    Sudanese war planes bombed a market in the capital of South Sudan's oil-producing Unity State on Monday, residents and officials said, an attack the southern army called a declaration of war.

    Sudan denied carrying out any air raids but its President Omar Hassan al-Bashir ramped up the political tension by ruling out a return to negotiations with the South, saying its government only understood "the language of the gun".

    A Reuters journalist saw aircraft dropping two bombs near a bridge linking two areas of Unity's capital Bentiu, although it was not possible to verify the planes' affiliation. He saw market stalls ablaze and the body of one child.

    U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's press office issued a statement saying he "condemns the aerial bombardment on South Sudan by Sudanese Armed Forces and calls on the Government of Sudan to cease all hostilities immediately."

    Weeks of border fighting have brought the neighbors closer to a full-blown war than at any time since South Sudan split from Sudan as an independent country in July.

    The two territories went their separate ways last year without settling a list of bitter disputes over the position of their shared border, the ownership of key territories and how much the landlocked South should pay to transport its oil through Sudan.

    The disputes have already halted nearly all the oil production that underpins both struggling economies.

    "Bashir is declaring war on South Sudan. It's something obvious," southern army (SPLA) spokesman Philip Aguer said after the Bentiu bombing.

    Aguer and the United Nations Mission in South Sudan said two people were killed in the air strike in Unity state where the Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Company (GNPOC) operates blocks. China's CNPC leads this consortium, along with Malaysia's Petronas and India's ONGC Videsh.

    "Early reports indicate the bombings started at 8.30 hours and that Rubkona market has been struck," the U.N. mission said in a statement, without spelling out who carried out the attack.

    "These indiscriminate bombings resulting in the loss of civilian lives must stop," said Hilde F. Johnson, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for South Sudan.

    The mission said its officers had seen one bomb land on the market and three near a bridge. "A young boy burned to death as the hut he was in caught fire from the blast in Rubkona market area," it quoted one of its officers as saying.

    Bentiu is about 80 km (50 miles) from the contested and poorly marked border with Sudan.

    Sudan denied carrying out any air attacks in the area. "We have no relation to what happened in Unity state, and we absolutely did not bomb anywhere in South Sudan," the country's military spokesman, Al-Sawarmi Khalid, said.
     
  5. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Chief negotiator calls for EU involvement in strengthened UN force to end conflict with Sudan.

    South Sudan would like the international community to upgrade its military mission to the country and the EU to contribute troops, its chief negotiator said yesterday.

    The call, by Pagan Amum, comes against the backdrop of continuing clashes between Sudan and South Sudan, which seceded from the north in July 2011.

    Intermittent clashes since January have in the past month turned into substantial military engagement on the ground, with repeated reports of aerial bombardment by Sudan. Already, roughly half of Sudan's oil-production capacity appears to have been crippled. There have been warnings that the clashes could turn into a full-scale war, evoking memories of Sudan's decades-long civil war, which ended only in 2005 and led eventually to South Sudan's independence.

    In an interview with European Voice in Brussels, Amum said that South Sudan was prepared to return to negotiations “without preconditions” and fully accepted the roadmap to peace drawn up on Tuesday (24 April) by the international contact group leading peace-making efforts, the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP).

    “We are actually asking to have it strengthened,” he said, with a stronger international force than the UN currently has on the ground. The UN's secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, said on 21 April that troops from the UN Interim Security Force in Abyei (UNISFA) were ready to be deployed to the area of the conflict.

    UNISFA , which was established last year, comprised 3,716 troops and 83 military observers as of 31 March, drawn from Russia, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Tunisia. Amum said that he would like the EU to contribute personnel.

    The EU's foreign-policy chief, Catherine Ashton, yesterday (26 April) reiterated the EU's support for the AUHIP roadmap.

    Amum discussed two of the thorniest issues in relations between Juba and Khartoum: borders and oil.

    He called for international arbitration on settling border disputes, most sensitively in the oil-rich Abyei region, to the west of Heglig.

    In March, Juba and Khartoum had reiterated their commitment to discuss oil issues, as part of broader discussions. But Amum said yesterday that South Sudan would not discuss oil, reiterating a statement he made on 23 April that Sudan has made a strategic decision not to pipe oil northward through Sudan in future.

    In January, South Sudan turned off the taps to South Sudan – even though it currently has no alternative routes for oil and even though 98% of its official revenues come from oil.

    South Sudan cut supplies because, it said, Sudan had siphoned off oil; Sudan said it took the oil as compensation for unpaid transit fees.

    Clashes at the border in late March and early April were followed, on 10 April, by South Sudan's capture of the Heglig oil fields in Sudan on 10 April, a move condemned internationally. On 20 April, a day after a visit by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, South Sudan withdrew – or, South Sudan claims, was forced out. Reports suggest that oil field infrastructure has been so severely damaged that Sudan's oil-producing capacity (115,000 a day) may have been halved.

    Amum said that South Sudan is now developing plans for alternative routes.

    Funding for new pipelines – two are being considered – is among the topics that Salva Kiir, South Sudan's president, is currently raising on a five-day visit to China, which has large economic interests in both South Sudan and Sudan.

    Amum's diplomatic mission to Europe is taking him to Norway and the UK, two of the three members of the international troika of countries most involved in negotiating an end to Sudan's civil war. (The other member is the US.)

    In Brussels, he met the two European commissioners responsible for aid and development, Kristalina Georgieva (international co-operation and humanitarian aid) and Andris Piebalgs (development), and the deputy secretary-general of the European External Action Service, Helga Schmid.

    Amum said he would like to see more international engagement in Sudan. Attention has waned, he said, since the signing of a comprehensive peace agreement in 2005, which ended a civil war that began in 1983.

    Amum was the official spokesman of the Sudan People's Liberation Army from 1994 onwards.

    South Sudan wants EU to send troops | European Voice

    Chief negotiator calls for EU involvement in strengthened UN force to end conflict with Sudan.

    South Sudan would like the international community to upgrade its military mission to the country and the EU to contribute troops, its chief negotiator said yesterday.

    The call, by Pagan Amum, comes against the backdrop of continuing clashes between Sudan and South Sudan, which seceded from the north in July 2011.

    Intermittent clashes since January have in the past month turned into substantial military engagement on the ground, with repeated reports of aerial bombardment by Sudan. Already, roughly half of Sudan's oil-production capacity appears to have been crippled. There have been warnings that the clashes could turn into a full-scale war, evoking memories of Sudan's decades-long civil war, which ended only in 2005 and led eventually to South Sudan's independence.

    In an interview with European Voice in Brussels, Amum said that South Sudan was prepared to return to negotiations “without preconditions†and fully accepted the roadmap to peace drawn up on Tuesday (24 April) by the international contact group leading peace-making efforts, the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP).

    “We are actually asking to have it strengthened,†he said, with a stronger international force than the UN currently has on the ground. The UN's secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, said on 21 April that troops from the UN Interim Security Force in Abyei (UNISFA) were ready to be deployed to the area of the conflict.

    UNISFA , which was established last year, comprised 3,716 troops and 83 military observers as of 31 March, drawn from Russia, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Tunisia. Amum said that he would like the EU to contribute personnel.

    The EU's foreign-policy chief, Catherine Ashton, yesterday (26 April) reiterated the EU's support for the AUHIP roadmap.

    Amum discussed two of the thorniest issues in relations between Juba and Khartoum: borders and oil.

    He called for international arbitration on settling border disputes, most sensitively in the oil-rich Abyei region, to the west of Heglig.

    In March, Juba and Khartoum had reiterated their commitment to discuss oil issues, as part of broader discussions. But Amum said yesterday that South Sudan would not discuss oil, reiterating a statement he made on 23 April that Sudan has made a strategic decision not to pipe oil northward through Sudan in future.

    In January, South Sudan turned off the taps to South Sudan – even though it currently has no alternative routes for oil and even though 98% of its official revenues come from oil.

    South Sudan cut supplies because, it said, Sudan had siphoned off oil; Sudan said it took the oil as compensation for unpaid transit fees.

    Clashes at the border in late March and early April were followed, on 10 April, by South Sudan's capture of the Heglig oil fields in Sudan on 10 April, a move condemned internationally. On 20 April, a day after a visit by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, South Sudan withdrew – or, South Sudan claims, was forced out. Reports suggest that oil field infrastructure has been so severely damaged that Sudan's oil-producing capacity (115,000 a day) may have been halved.

    Amum said that South Sudan is now developing plans for alternative routes.

    Funding for new pipelines – two are being considered – is among the topics that Salva Kiir, South Sudan's president, is currently raising on a five-day visit to China, which has large economic interests in both South Sudan and Sudan.

    Amum's diplomatic mission to Europe is taking him to Norway and the UK, two of the three members of the international troika of countries most involved in negotiating an end to Sudan's civil war. (The other member is the US.)

    In Brussels, he met the two European commissioners responsible for aid and development, Kristalina Georgieva (international co-operation and humanitarian aid) and Andris Piebalgs (development), and the deputy secretary-general of the European External Action Service, Helga Schmid.

    Amum said he would like to see more international engagement in Sudan. Attention has waned, he said, since the signing of a comprehensive peace agreement in 2005, which ended a civil war that began in 1983.

    Amum was the official spokesman of the Sudan People's Liberation Army from 1994 onwards.

    South Sudan wants EU to send troops | European Voice
     
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