Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -bangladesh border

Discussion in 'Military History & Strategy' started by Eddie, Jul 20, 2013.

  1. Eddie
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    Eddie SENIOR MEMBER

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    Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India - Bangladesh border

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    Well, I was just random surfing through the internet, when i came to know about this strange border arrangement between India and bangladesh. At first I thought it was a fake news. But no. A lot of shit happened during partition which was not good. It was painful and difficult, for the people involved as well as for those, who had to make decisions and set the borders. And sometimes, during these tense hours people made stupid decisions and did stupid things. Ofcourse one of the most known one I would say was East Pakistan and west pakistan. What happened we all know. But there are some other minor blunders or perhaps bat shit insanity (I dont know what to call it) were done during the partition.

    It is all bout this piece of land called "Dahala Khagrabari" which belongs to us. It lies near India - bangladesh border. But the strangest thing about this place is, that it is the world's only 3rd order enclave. Before going further let me explain what a "3rd order enclave" is. Or first what an enclave is. "An enclave is a territory entirely surrounded by another territory , all across its borders."(says wiki)

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    eg. of enclave in WIKI, C is A's enclave​



    Now that was just 1st order enclave. Now imagine a 3rd order enclave. That is what 'Dahal Khagrabari' is. This is the best, I could draw in paint.


    [​IMG]



    It's surrounded by part of Bangladesh, which is surrounded by part of India, which is surrounded by Bangladesh -- the world's only counter-counter-enclave. So when driving across it in a straight line, it'd go India, Bangladesh, India, Bangladesh, India, Bangladesh, India, Bangladesh. Probably, the ones who were drawing the map were high on bhaang :p.

    For India to try to provide these people with basic amenities like electricity or water would be a logistical nightmare, so we never bothered. Of course things like road would have been laughed upon. And the people of that place are more laughable. Although they're Indian citizens, they can't leave their immediate neighborhood without passing through Bangladesh, for which they need a passport. But they can only get a passport from mainland India -- which they can't get to without passing through Bangladesh. Twice. lol In big mess they are, or may be not.

    The last info I could find about that place was on wiki and it was dated back to 2011.

    "Due to a lack of governance and unfavourable conditions faced by residents of the enclaves, in September 2011 the governments of India and Bangladesh announced their intention to resolve the issue by means of swapping 162 enclaves, giving residents a choice of nationality." - WIKI

    Yeah I forgot to mention, there are hundreds of such enclaves, all across our border.
    Here are some of those enclaves I found on Google.


    [​IMG]
    Bangladeshi Metaenclave Debidoba surrounded by the Indian enclave Khagabari Dahala. © Brendan Whyte



    [​IMG]
    Farmland behind the fence that marks the border between India and Bangladesh, seen from India. The actual border is 150 meters further, due to the agreement between the two countries to respect a buffer zone of 300 meters around the border. The farmers who have land in that area must cross the fence every day, despite staying in Indian Territory.



    [​IMG]
    Meta-Dahala Indian metaenclave Khagrabari. In the foreground, a marker border. © Brendan Whyte



    "The sad story of Atab Mohamed Ali, a Muslim resident Seortikursha Indian enclave is one of the many that dot the inside story of the enclaves. The site has an area of 18 hectares (approximately one third of the one with the Vatican, for example), and one end is just six meters, six main border with India. In 1994 Mohamed arranged the marriage of his daughter to a young Indian resident outside the enclaves, in the mainland India. But the wedding day Bangladeshi border guards intercepted the young, so they could not access the enclave, and the girl remained unmarried until today."------ quotes this website, cannot verify the authenticity though.
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
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  2. Soumya
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    Soumya SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -bangladesh bor

    There are 100s of enclaves of both India and Bangladesh present within each others border. We need to resolve these issues.
  3. rocky.idf
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    rocky.idf SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -bangladesh bor

    Soon after the Mujib-Indira pact regarding exchange of the enclaves, we have promptly fulfilled our obligation. India, on the other hand, keeps dragging feet siting one excuse or the other. Our perception has been that India has been insincere in addressing this issue which hurts thousands of people in both nations daily.
  4. Eddie
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    Eddie SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -bangladesh bor



    SEPTEMBER 6th, 2011, marks a watershed in the annals of bizarre geography. It saw the prime ministers of India and Bangladesh sign an agreement that will consign a whopping 201 enclaves to the history books, leaving just 49 similar exterritorial patches, mostly in Western Europe and on the fringes of the former Soviet Union. The two South Asian neighbours will exchange plots, including a patch of Bangladeshi land surrounded by Indian territory itself improbably ensconced within Bangladesh, clustered on either side of the border between the Bangladeshi district of Rangpur and the district of Cooch Behar, in the Indian state of West Bengal (as discussed by Banyan in February).

    The deal is long overdue. In effect disowned by both states, the enclaves are pockets of abject poverty. In his book "Stateless in South Asia: The making of the India Bangladesh Enclaves”, Wilhelm Schendel chronicles futile attempts by politicians and two “self-absorbed bureaucracies” to implement a plan agreed soon after partition: first to regulate the rights of passage of the residents and then settle the matter conclusively by exhanging enclaves. Most strikingly, in 1952, when what was then East Pakistan and India agreed to impose passport and visa controls for the first time, the two states forgot about the people living in the enclaves.

    Not much changed after Bangladesh's independence from Pakistan in 1971. The Indira-Mujib Land Boundary Agreement in 1974 was meant to change all that. In it, the two countries resolved to exchange enclaves "expeditiously", and India agreed to forgo compensation for the additional area going to Bangladesh. Bangladesh's parliament ratified the treaty; India's never did. The area of Indian enclaves on Bangladeshi territory is nearly 70 square kilometres; Bangladesh's add up to 28 square kilometres. The agreed transfer simplifies the messy boundary but means a 40-square-kilometre net loss for India.

    It might seem that this is a small price to pay for India to fix its wonky border. Predictably, though, India's opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has tried to present the enclaves as symbols of Indian territorial inviolability and an opportunity to flaunt its Hindu-nationalist credentials and to attack what it sees as the ruling Congress Party's weak spot—its perceived softness towards illegal immigrants from Bangladesh, most of them Muslims.

    To the residents of Dohala Khagrabari what matters is an end to statelessness and access to basic services. Ayub Ali from Dohala Khagrabari, an Indian enclave in Bangladesh's Nilphamari district, says there are no schools, no police and people don't have access to subsidised food or fertiliser. Mr Ali does not speak Hindi, only Bengali. Like other Dohala Khagrabari's denizens, he wants it be merged with Bangladesh. Yet identity has very little to do with the nation-state. “I am neither Indian, nor Bangladeshi," he quips. "I am a farmer."

    The end of the enclaves



    I agree that the fault is of our side. I am sorry for the people who are affected by this mess..
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
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  5. rocky.idf
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    rocky.idf SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -bangladesh bor

    Thank you. Do you see how unthinking idiots in high places in SA bring misery to people and cause tension among nations? And all for some political gain. JP, Gujral, Morarji Desai, and the leader that has been gagged down, Jaswant Singh would have / would make the difference. But the best would be a non-political military admin.
  6. layman
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    layman Field Marshal Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    Re: Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -bangladesh bor

    I prefer all these enclaves to turned into economic buffer zones, which will be interest of both nations.

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